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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: alarm bell
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 1:19:33 PM
Topic: Sacraments
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 1:16:24 PM
Topic: harum-scarum
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 1:13:54 PM
Topic: air rage
Posted: Saturday, August 17, 2019 4:23:55 PM
Topic: Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature.
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2019 2:45:59 PM

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Mrs Wackford Squeers doles out the brimstone at Dotheboys' Hall



The workhouse children of Charles Dickens’s Mudfog have a porringer of oatmeal and water three times a day. Oliver and his fellow starvelings polish the bowls clean with their spoons and lick their fingers for stray splashes of gruel. In some ways they are fortunate. There are worse breakfasts in Dickens. In Nicholas Nickleby, the pupils of Dotheboys Hall have their porridge – “which looked like diluted pincushions without the covers” – from Mrs Wackford Squeers, who first doses each boy with brimstone and treacle because it spoils his appetite.

Wackford Squeers, headmaster of Dotheboys Hall, is all for good breakfasts – but only if he’s the one who is eating them. In the dining room of a coaching inn, Squeers lines up before him the five little boys, unlucky all, who will shortly go up to his Yorkshire school. He orders two penn’orth of milk in a blue mug, thinned with lukewarm water. ‘Why the milk will be drowned,’ protests the waiter, mindful of five boys with empty stomachs. Mr Squeers is unmoved. ‘Conquer your passions, boys, and don’t be eager after vittles.’

The lukewarm milk and water arrives and Squeers tells his charges how they will proceed. “‘When I say number one’, pursued Mr Squeers, putting the mug before the children, ‘the boy on the left hand nearest the window may take a drink; and when I say number two the boy next him will go in, and so till we come to number five, which is the last boy. Are you ready?’ ‘Yes, sir,’ cry the little boys, eager and hungry. ‘That’s right,’ said Squeers, calmly getting on with his breakfast; ‘keep ready till I tell you to begin. Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you’ve conquered human nature. This is the way we inculcate strength of mind, Mr Nickleby.'”


How Books Restored my Appetite (W&N;£16.99). Buy from Amazon. Laura Freeman is an author and freelance journalist based in London. She writes about art, architecture, books and food for the Spectator, Times, Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, Apollo, World of Interiors and TLS. She is a former dance critic for the Evening Standard. She read History of Art at Cambridge, graduating with a double first in 2010.

https://www.idler.co.uk/article/book-of-the-week-the-reading-cure-by-laura-freeman/#targetText='Conquer%20your%20passions%2C%20boys%2C,charges%20how%20they%20will%20proceed.&targetText='That's%20right%2C'%20said%20Squeers,I%20tell%20you%20to%20begin.
Topic: Disco
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2019 9:13:29 AM
Topic: tweedy
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2019 8:30:45 AM



Tweedy Knit Neck Warmer
Topic: ace (something)
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2019 8:19:58 AM
Topic: One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2019 8:12:58 AM

Context from: Persuasion
Chapter 20

"You were a good while at Lyme, I think?"

"About a fortnight. I could not leave it till Louisa's doing well was quite ascertained. I had been too deeply concerned in the mischief to be soon at peace. It had been my doing, solely mine. She would not have been obstinate if I had not been weak. The country round Lyme is very fine. I walked and rode a great deal; and the more I saw, the more I found to admire."

"I should very much like to see Lyme again," said Anne.

"Indeed! I should not have supposed that you could have found anything in Lyme to inspire such a feeling. The horror and distress you were involved in, the stretch of mind, the wear of spirits! I should have thought your last impressions of Lyme must have been strong disgust."

"The last hours were certainly very painful," replied Anne; "but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure. One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering, which was by no means the case at Lyme. We were only in anxiety and distress during the last two hours, and previously there had been a great deal of enjoyment. So much novelty and beauty! I have travelled so little, that every fresh place would be interesting to me; but there is real beauty at Lyme; and in short" (with a faint blush at some recollections), "altogether my impressions of the place are very agreeable."

As she ceased, the entrance door opened again, and the very party appeared for whom they were waiting. "Lady Dalrymple, Lady Dalrymple," was the rejoicing sound; and with all the eagerness compatible with anxious elegance, Sir Walter and his two ladies stepped forward to meet her. Lady Dalrymple and Miss Carteret, escorted by Mr Elliot and Colonel Wallis, who had happened to arrive nearly at the same instant, advanced into the room. The others joined them, and it was a group in which Anne found herself also necessarily included. She was divided from Captain Wentworth. Their interesting, almost too interesting conversation must be broken up for a time, but slight was the penance compared with the happiness which brought it on! She had learnt, in the last ten minutes, more of his feelings towards Louisa, more of all his feelings than she dared to think of; and she gave herself up to the demands of the party, to the needful civilities of the moment, with exquisite, though agitated sensations. She was in good humour with all. She had received ideas which disposed her to be courteous and kind to all, and to pity every one, as being less happy than herself.

http://www.literaturepage.com/read.php?titleid=persuasion&abspage=161&bookmark=1

Topic: rough-cut
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 11:20:50 AM

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