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User Name: monamagda
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Joined: Tuesday, February 4, 2014
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 10:22:03 AM
Number of Posts: 6,674
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Topic: Curiosity is natural to the soul of man, and interesting objects have a powerful influence on our affections.
Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 10:22:03 AM

Context: As quoted in the opening lines of "The Adventures of Col. Daniel Boon; containing a Narrative of the Wars of Kentucke" in The Discovery, Settlement And present State of Kentucke (1784) by John Filson

"Curiosity is natural to the soul of man, and interesting objects have a powerful influence over our affections. Let these influencing powers actuate, by the permission or disposal of Providence, from selfish or social views, yet in time the mysterious will of Heaven is unfolded, and we behold our conduct, from whatsoever motives excited, operating to answer the important designs of heaven. Thus we behold Kentucke, lately an howling wilderness, the habitation of savages and wild beasts, become a fruitful field; this region, so favourably distinguished by nature, now become the habitation of civilization, at a period unparalleled in history, in the midst of a raging war, an under all the disadvantages of emigration to a country so remote from the inhabited parts of the continent. Here; where the hand of violence shed the blood of the innocent; where the horrid yells of savages, and the groans of the distressed, sounded in our ears, we now hear the praises and adorations of our Creator; where wretched wigwams stood, the miserable abodes of savages, we behold the foundations of cities laid, that, in all probability, will rival the glory of the greatest upon earth. And we view Kentucke situated on the fertile banks of the great Ohio, rising from obscurity to shine with splendor, equal to any other of the stars of the American hemisphere.

Read more: http://www.loyalbooks.com/book/Life-and-Adventures-of-Colonel-Daniel-Boon
Topic: constellate
Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 6:52:24 PM
Topic: A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no...
Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 2:32:46 PM

Context from:Silas Marner

Part 1: Chapter 5

CHAPTER V

When Dunstan Cass turned his back on the cottage, Silas Marner was not more than a hundred yards away from it, plodding along from the village with a sack thrown round his shoulders as an overcoat, and with a horn lantern in his hand. His legs were weary, but his mind was at ease, free from the presentiment of change. The sense of security more frequently springs from habit than from conviction, and for this reason it often subsists after such a change in the conditions as might have been expected to suggest alarm. The lapse of time during which a given event has not happened, is, in this logic of habit, constantly alleged as a reason why the event should never happen, even when the lapse of time is precisely the added condition which makes the event imminent. A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink; and it is often observable, that the older a man gets, the more difficult it is to him to retain a believing conception of his own death. This influence of habit was necessarily strong in a man whose life was so monotonous as Marner's — who saw no new people and heard of no new events to keep alive in him the idea of the unexpected and the changeful; and it explains simply enough, why his mind could be at ease, though he had left his house and his treasure more defenceless than usual. Silas was thinking with double complacency of his supper: first, because it would be hot and savoury; and secondly, because it would cost him nothing. For the little bit of pork was a present from that excellent housewife, Miss Priscilla Lammeter, to whom he had this day carried home a handsome piece of linen; and it was only on occasion of a present like this, that Silas indulged himself with roast-meat. Supper was his favourite meal, because it came at his time of revelry, when his heart warmed over his gold; whenever he had roast-meat, he always chose to have it for supper. But this evening, he had no sooner ingeniously knotted his string fast round his bit of pork, twisted the string according to rule over his door-key, passed it through the handle, and made it fast on the hanger, than he remembered that a piece of very fine twine was indispensable to his "setting up" a new piece of work in his loom early in the morning. It had slipped his memory, because, in coming from Mr. Lammeter's, he had not had to pass through the village; but to lose time by going on errands in the morning was out of the question. It was a nasty fog to turn out into, but there were things Silas loved better than his own comfort; so, drawing his pork to the extremity of the hanger, and arming himself with his lantern and his old sack, he set out on what, in ordinary weather, would have been a twenty minutes' errand. He could not have locked his door without undoing his well-knotted string and retarding his supper; it was not worth his while to make that sacrifice. What thief would find his way to the Stone-pits on such a night as this? and why should he come on this particular night, when he had never come through all the fifteen years before? These questions were not distinctly present in Silas's mind; they merely serve to represent the vaguely-felt foundation of his freedom from anxiety.

Read more: https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/s/silas-marner/summary-and-analysis/part-1-chapter-5/part-1-chapter-5-1
Topic: Jamaica National Heroes Day
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 11:44:17 PM
Topic: periwig
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 11:14:28 PM



The most important feature of men's hairstyles in the 1660s is that it was supposed to look natural, but to be at least wavy, and even better, to be curly. It appears that the early periwig strove to imitate natural hair with the gentlemen hoping to get away with them and being mistaken for having a head of lovely, long, curly, healthy hair. Often the wigs made use of the natural hair, particularly in the front/at the forehead, where it was pulled through the wig to appear more natural. Samuel Pepys Mentions that he had been wearing a periwig for a while, but then he grew his hair back long from being shaved - hair was shaved or clipped very short underneath wigs, otherwise the hat beneath the wigs would be unacceptable and the cut off hair was used for a new wig - but after a while decided it was so much less hassle to just put on a wig instead of trying to keep the natural hair clean. This particularly true in an age where hair was washed less tan often, there are recipes for a hair water which promises to keep the hair clean for the following year. Hair was combed, but not washed often, and brushes had not been invented yet. Instead wood, horn or bone combs were used.

http://www.kipar.org/archive/costume-workshop/part4_10hair-men.html

Topic: What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 10:06:22 PM


Context from: Middlemarch

Chapter 72
Full souls are double mirrors, making still
An endless vista of fair things before,
Repeating things behind.


I feel convinced that his conduct has not been guilty: I believe that people are almost always better than their neighbors think they are," said Dorothea. Some of her intensest experience in the last two years had set her mind strongly in opposition to any unfavorable construction of others; and for the first time she felt rather discontented with Mr. Farebrother. She disliked this cautious weighing of consequences, instead of an ardent faith in efforts of justice and mercy, which would conquer by their emotional force. Two days afterwards, he was dining at the Manor with her uncle and the Chettams, and when the dessert was standing uneaten, the servants were out of the room, and Mr. Brooke was nodding in a nap, she returned to the subject with renewed vivacity.

"Mr. Lydgate would understand that if his friends hear a calumny about him their first wish must be to justify him. What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other? I cannot be indifferent to the troubles of a man who advised me in MY trouble, and attended me in my illness."

Dorothea's tone and manner were not more energetic than they had been when she was at the head of her uncle's table nearly three years before, and her experience since had given her more right to express a decided opinion. But Sir James Chettam was no longer the diffident and acquiescent suitor: he was the anxious brother-in-law, with a devout admiration for his sister, but with a constant alarm lest she should fall under some new illusion almost as bad as marrying Casaubon. He smiled much less; when he said "Exactly" it was more often an introduction to a dissentient opinion than in those submissive bachelor days; and Dorothea found to her surprise that she had to resolve not to be afraid of him - all the more because he was really her best friend. He disagreed with her now.

http://www.online-literature.com/george_eliot/middlemarch/72/

Topic: Do you know why this world is as bad as it is? ... It is because people think only about their own business, and won't...
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 11:55:19 AM


Context from: Black Beauty: The Autobiography of a Horse

CHAPTER XIII

DOLLY AND A REAL GENTLEMAN


On returning to the cab, our friend was joined by his companion, who
said laughing, "I should have thought, Wright, you had enough business
of your own to look after, without troubling yourself about other
people's horses and servants."

Our friend stood still for a moment, and throwing his head a little
back, "Do you know why this world is as bad as it is?"

"No," said the other.

"Then I'll tell you. It is because people think only about their own
business, and won't trouble themselves to stand up for the oppressed,
nor bring the wrong-doer to light.
I never see a wicked thing like this
without doing what I can, and many a master has thanked me for letting
him know how his horses have been used."

"I wish there were more gentlemen like you, sir," said Jerry, "for they
are wanted badly enough in this city."

Read more:https://www.gutenberg.org/files/11860/11860.txt

Topic: whittle
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 12:14:26 PM
Topic: sit a spell
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 12:08:58 PM
Topic: Mozambique Peace Day
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 7:38:46 AM



Malangatana
contemporary-african-art.com
Valente Malangatana Ngwena (1936 -2011) Born in Malatana, Southern Mozambique, Valente Malangatana Ngwena is Mozambique’s most renowned artist


Day of Peace and Reconciliation
OCTOBER 3,

Today,the 4th of October, Mozambique will mark the anniversary of the signing of the general agreement of peace, between the Government of Mozambique and RENAMO – the Mozambique National Resistance. Since the signing of the agreement in 1994, Mozambique has been experiencing growth and steadily gaining in key areas of economic development. Construction and the rehabilitation of the social infrastructure — schools, roads, bridges, hospitals — as well as the development of mining projects and the exploration of natural resources are all top priorities.



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