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User Name: monamagda
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Joined: Tuesday, February 4, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, December 9, 2018 6:56:05 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: pull an all-nighter
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 6:56:05 PM
Topic: There is nothing nobler or more admirable than when two people who see eye to eye keep house as man and wife, confounding...
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 12:11:59 PM

Context from: the Odyssey (175-185).

Book VI

ἀλλά, ἄνασσ᾽, ἐλέαιρε· σὲ γὰρ κακὰ πολλὰ μογήσας ἐς πρώτην ἱκόμην, τῶν δ᾽ ἄλλων οὔ τινα οἶδα ἀνθρώπων, οἳ τήνδε πόλιν καὶ γαῖαν ἔχουσιν. ἄστυ δέ μοι δεῖξον, δὸς δὲ ῥάκος ἀμφιβαλέσθαι, εἴ τί που εἴλυμα σπείρων ἔχες ἐνθάδ᾽ ἰοῦσα. σοὶ δὲ θεοὶ τόσα δοῖεν ὅσα φρεσὶ σῇσι μενοινᾷς, ἄνδρα τε καὶ οἶκον, καὶ ὁμοφροσύνην ὀπάσειαν ἐσθλήν· οὐ μὲν γὰρ τοῦ γε κρεῖσσον καὶ ἄρειον, ἢ ὅθ᾽ ὁμοφρονέοντε νοήμασιν οἶκον ἔχητον ἀνὴρ ἠδὲ γυνή· πόλλ᾽ ἄλγεα δυσμενέεσσι, χάρματα δ᾽ εὐμενέτῃσι, μάλιστα δέ τ᾽ ἔκλυον αὐτοί.

"And now, O queen, have pity upon me, for you are the first person I have met, and I know no one else in this country. Show me the way to your town, and let me have anything that you may have brought hither to wrap your clothes in. May heaven grant you in all things your heart's desire--husband, house, and a happy, peaceful home; for there is nothing better in this world than that man and wife should be of one mind in a house. It discomfits their enemies, makes the hearts of their friends glad, and they themselves know more about it than any one."

To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible, well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove gives prosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must take what he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now, however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not want for clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress may reasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and will tell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I am daughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."

https://www.pagebypagebooks.com/Homer_Butler_Tr/The_Odyssey/Book_VI_p4.html



Topic: pound sand
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 8:13:34 PM


Go pound sand is a statement of contempt, similarly as 'get lost', 'go and play in the movement', and so forth.

The expression began in the US and albeit common there, particularly the Midwest states, it isn't every now and again heard in different nations. The rendition 'go pound salt up your rear end's is additionally once in a while utilized, apparently to increase the picture of uneasiness.

This is once in a while utilized with the aim of signifying 'go and beat/whack sand' - with the back of a scoop or comparative. That is not the first importance however, as is clarified from the more extended and less-regularly utilized variant of the expression - 'go pound sand up your rear end'. There are two tackles go pound sand. The later, apparently a result of World War II, and regularly euphemized, is go pound sand up one's can.

It is utilized to reject and disparage, and is eventually an eager method for saying: 'go away' The expressions "go pound sand" plus "insufficient sense to pound sand" is American slang from the nineteenth century. It is a reference to modest, and regularly pointless, labor....The last expression frequently shows up in a more extended structure, "insufficient sense to pound sand down a rathole." And this shows up fairly later.

There's additionally a less disgusting adaptation, 'go pound sand in your ears'. In the military "pound sand" generally implies the respondent has their "heels dove in" and is not going to do what you are inquiring.

Regardless of how hard you attempt, sand won't comply with the shape you need in the event that you beat on it... The individual is stating that it is pointless to ask or specify the issue once more... as pointless as beating sand. But "Pound sand" has gotten away from it’s before dirty affiliation.

https://www.quora.com/Where-does-the-phrase-go-pound-sand-come-from



Topic: Books, not which afford us a cowering enjoyment, but in which each thought is of unusual daring; such as an idle man cannot...
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 4:32:39 PM

Context from: A WEEK ON THE CONCORD AND MERRIMACK RIVERS

SUNDAY

It would be worth the while to select our reading, for books are the society we keep; to read only the serenely true; never statistics, nor fiction, nor news, nor reports, nor periodicals, but only great poems, and when they failed, read them again, or perchance write more. Instead of other sacrifice, we might offer up our perfect (τελεία) thoughts to the gods daily, in hymns or psalms. For we should be at the helm at least once a day. The whole of the day should not be daytime; there should be one hour, if no more, which the day did not bring forth. Scholars are wont to sell their birthright for a mess of learning. But is it necessary to know what the speculator prints, or the thoughtless study, or the idle read, the literature of the Russians and the Chinese, or even French philosophy and much of German criticism. Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them at all. “There are the worshippers with offerings, and the worshippers with mortifications; and again the worshippers with enthusiastic devotion; so there are those the wisdom of whose reading is their worship, men of subdued passions and severe manners;—This world is not for him who doth not worship; and where, O Arjoon, is there another?” Certainly, we do not need to be soothed and entertained always like children. He who resorts to the easy novel, because he is languid, does no better than if he took a nap. The front aspect of great thoughts can only be enjoyed by those who stand on the side whence they arrive. Books, not which afford us a cowering enjoyment, but in which each thought is of unusual daring; such as an idle man cannot read, and a timid one would not be entertained by, which even make us dangerous to existing institutions,—such call I good books.

All that are printed and bound are not books; they do not necessarily belong to letters, but are oftener to be ranked with the other luxuries and appendages of civilized life. Base wares are palmed off under a thousand disguises. “The way to trade,” as a pedler once told me, “is to put it right through,” no matter what it is, anything that is agreed on.

Read more:http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4232/4232-h/4232-h.htm#link2H_4_0003



Topic: go halfsies
Posted: Friday, December 7, 2018 7:59:55 PM
Topic: One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him.
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:14:04 PM

Context from: An Address on Abraham Lincoln
Booker T. Washington
Before the Republican Club of New York City
February 12, 1909


Lincoln in his day was wise enough to recognize that which is true in the present and for all time: that in a state of slavery and ignorance man renders the lowest and most costly form of service to his fellows. In a state of freedom and enlightenment he renders the highest and most helpful form of service.

The world is fast learning that of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color. One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him. One who goes through life with his eyes closed against all that is good in another race is weakened and circumscribed, as one who fights in a battle with one hand tied behind him. Lincoln was in the truest sense great because he unfettered himself. He climbed up out of the valley, where his vision was narrowed and weakened by the fog and miasma, onto the mountain top, where in a pure and unclouded atmosphere he could see the truth which enabled him to rate all men at their true worth. Growing out of this anniversary season and atmosphere, may there crystallize a resolve throughout the nation than on such a mountain the American people will strive to live.

We owe, then, to Lincoln physical freedom, moral freedom, and yet this is not all. There is a debt of gratitude which we as individuals, no matter of what race or nation, must recognize as due Abraham Lincoln — not for what he did as chief executive of the nation, but for what he did as a man. In his rise from the most abject poverty and ignorance to a position of high usefulness and power, he taught the world one of the greatest of all lessons. In fighting his own battle up from obscurity and squalor, he fought the battle of every other individual and race that is down, and so helped to pull up every other human who was down. People so often forget that by every inch that the lowest man crawls up he makes it easier for every other man to get up. Today, throughout the world, because Lincoln lived, struggled, and triumphed, every boy who is ignorant, is in poverty, is despised or discouraged, holds his head a little higher. His heart beats a little faster, his ambition to do something and be something is a little stronger, because Lincoln blazed the way.

Read more: http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/an-address-on-abraham-lincoln/

Topic: A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 1:26:01 PM

Context from: Alexander Hamilton, Letter to Robert Morris, [30 April 1781]
[De Peyster’s Point, New York, April 30, 1781]

Sir,

This calculation supposes the ability of these states for revenue to continue the same as they now are, which is a supposition both false and unfavorable. Speaking within moderate bounds our population will be doubled in thirty years; there will be a confluence of emigrants from all parts of the world; our commerce will have a proportional progress, and of course our wealth and capacity for revenue. It will be a matter of choice, if we are not out of debt in twenty years, without at all encumbering the people.

A national debt if it is not excessive will be to us a national blessing; it will be powerful cement of our union. It will also create a necessity for keeping up taxation to a degree which without being oppressive, will be a spur to industry; remote as we are from Europe and shall be from danger, it were otherwise to be feared our popular maxims would incline us to too great parsimony and indulgence. We labour less now than any civilized nation of Europe, and a habit of labour in the people is as essential to the health and vigor of their minds and bodies as it is conducive to the welfare of the State. We ought not to Suffer our self-love to deceive us in a comparison, upon these points.

I have spun out this letter to a much greater length than I intended. To develop the whole connection of my ideas on the subject and place my plan in the clearest light I have indulged myself in many observations which might have been omitted. I shall not longer intrude upon you[r] patience than to assure you of the sincere sentiments of esteem with which I have the honor to be your most Obedient and humble servant

Alx Hamilton

April 30th. 81

https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-02-02-116
Topic: A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 1:26:00 PM

Context from: Alexander Hamilton, Letter to Robert Morris, [30 April 1781]
[De Peyster’s Point, New York, April 30, 1781]

Sir,

This calculation supposes the ability of these states for revenue to continue the same as they now are, which is a supposition both false and unfavorable. Speaking within moderate bounds our population will be doubled in thirty years; there will be a confluence of emigrants from all parts of the world; our commerce will have a proportional progress, and of course our wealth and capacity for revenue. It will be a matter of choice, if we are not out of debt in twenty years, without at all encumbering the people.

A national debt if it is not excessive will be to us a national blessing; it will be powerful cement of our union. It will also create a necessity for keeping up taxation to a degree which without being oppressive, will be a spur to industry; remote as we are from Europe and shall be from danger, it were otherwise to be feared our popular maxims would incline us to too great parsimony and indulgence. We labour less now than any civilized nation of Europe, and a habit of labour in the people is as essential to the health and vigor of their minds and bodies as it is conducive to the welfare of the State. We ought not to Suffer our self-love to deceive us in a comparison, upon these points.

I have spun out this letter to a much greater length than I intended. To develop the whole connection of my ideas on the subject and place my plan in the clearest light I have indulged myself in many observations which might have been omitted. I shall not longer intrude upon you[r] patience than to assure you of the sincere sentiments of esteem with which I have the honor to be your most Obedient and humble servant

Alx Hamilton

April 30th. 81

https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-02-02-116
Topic: talk to the hand
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 7:41:07 PM
Topic: Life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such...
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 8:11:00 AM

Context from : Mark Twain's Letters 1901-1906

Page 04

To Edward L. Dimmitt, in St. Louis:

AMONG THE ADIRONDACK LAKES, July 19, 1901. DEAR MR. DIMMITT,--By an error in the plans, things go wrong end first in this world, and much precious time is lost and matters of urgent importance are fatally retarded. Invitations which a brisk young fellow should get, and which would transport him with joy, are delayed and impeded and obstructed until they are fifty years overdue when they reach him.

It has happened again in this case.

When I was a boy in Missouri I was always on the lookout for invitations but they always miscarried and went wandering through the aisles of time; and now they are arriving when I am old and rheumatic and can't travel and must lose my chance.

I have lost a world of delight through this matter of delaying invitations. Fifty years ago I would have gone eagerly across the world to help celebrate anything that might turn up. IT would have made no difference to me what it was, so that I was there and allowed a chance to make a noise.
The whole scheme of things is turned wrong end to. Life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages. As things are now, when in youth a dollar would bring a hundred pleasures, you can't have it. When you are old, you get it and there is nothing worth buying with it then.

It's an epitome of life. The first half of it consists of the capacity to enjoy without the chance; the last half consists of the chance without the capacity.

I am admonished in many ways that time is pushing me inexorably along. I am approaching the threshold of age; in 1977 I shall be 142. This is no time to be flitting about the earth. I must cease from the activities proper to youth and begin to take on the dignities and gravities and inertia proper to that season of honorable senility which is on its way and imminent as indicated above.

Yours is a great and memorable occasion, and as a son of Missouri I should hold it a high privilege to be there and share your just pride in the state's achievements; but I must deny myself the indulgence, while thanking you earnestly for the prized honor you have done me in asking me to be present. Very truly yours, S. L. CLEMENS.

In the foregoing Mark Twain touches upon one of his favorite fancies: that life should begin with old age and approach strong manhood, golden youth, to end at last with pampered and beloved babyhood. Possibly he contemplated writing a story with this idea as the theme, but He seems never to have done so.

The reader who has followed these letters may remember Yung Wing, who had charge of the Chinese educational mission in Hartford, and how Mark Twain, with Twichell, called on General Grant in behalf of the mission. Yung Wing, now returned to China, had conceived the idea of making an appeal to the Government of the United States for relief of his starving countrymen.


Read more: https://mark-twain.classic-literature.co.uk/mark-twains-letters-1901-1906/ebook-page-04.asp


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