The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Carmenex
About
User Name: Carmenex
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Tuesday, January 7, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:14:03 AM
Number of Posts: 980
[0.11% of all post / 0.59 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: established with
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:09:31 AM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

I believe that X Inc. is the ideal place for me to pursue my professional career because of its diverse clientele, which offers the opportunity to work on multiple cases, each relating to (involving [either one will work]) a different technology. Another dividend to working with X Inc. is the firm's global reach and, in particular, its capacity to work within the competitive and expanding Asian market, as exemplified by the successful relationship established with the patent department of the Asian branch of a world’s leading manufacturing company.



Hi FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions. Only a couple of questions:
Why do you prefer dividend to upside in: Another dividend/upside to working with ...?
Can work within be replaced with one of the following expressions in bold: ... its capacity to acquire/gain/earn/achieve a prominent position in/within the competitive and expanding Asian market ... And, is it worth including its capacity?
What do you think about inverting the position of the adjectives competitive and expanding and writing: ... the expanding but very competitive (or the expanding and/but, at the same time, very competitive) Asian market, ...?


Topic: established with
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 10:06:05 AM
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I believe that X Inc. is the ideal place for me to pursue my professional career because of (its diverse clientele)/(wide range of clients), which offers the opportunity to work on multiple cases, each relating to (a possible synonym of it?) a different technology. Another upside to (working with)/(pursuing a career at) X Inc. is its/(the firm's) global reach and, in particular, its capacity to penetrate the competitive and expanding Asian market, as exemplified by the successful relationship established with the patent department of the Asian business/team of a world’s leading manufacturing company.

Topic: on vs in the fields of
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 9:21:30 AM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following (splitting the sentence(s), if you think they read better):
My suggestions, and this is but one way to do it:

I believe that working as a _____ would afford me the opportunity to further my knowledge and skills in materials science and engineering, and apply them to understanding and critically analyzing a client's inventions, as well as assisting them in exploring the path to obtaining patents and in dealing with all patenting issues. I developed an interest in intellectual property in the course of my academic and professional career while consulting for multinational companies such as Y Inc. and Z Inc. where I investigated and developed research projects in the fields of nanotechnology and nanomaterials, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ceramic and glass materials.


Hi FounDit. I thought to break the last sentence into two and made the modifications in bold. I would please ask you which of the following phrasing (if any) do you prefer:

I developed an interest in intellectual property over the course of my academic and professional career, and, in particular, while consulting for multinational companies such as Y Inc. and Z Inc. My endeavors (have) included investigating and developing research projects in the fields of nanotechnology, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ...

I developed an interest in intellectual property over the course of my academic and professional career, and, in particular, while consulting for multinational companies such as Y Inc. and Z Inc. My fields of endeavors (have) included nanotechnology, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ...

Topic: on vs in the fields of
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 3:05:23 PM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following (splitting the sentence(s), if you think they read better):
My suggestions, and this is but one way to do it:

I believe that working as a _____ would afford me the opportunity to further my knowledge and skills in materials science and engineering, and apply them to understanding and critically analyzing a client's inventions, as well as assisting them in exploring the path to obtaining patents and in dealing with all patenting issues. I developed an interest in intellectual property in the course of my academic and professional career while consulting for multinational companies such as Y Inc. and Z Inc. where I investigated and developed research projects in the fields of nanotechnology and nanomaterials, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ceramic and glass materials.


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions. I thought to move the second sentence at the beginning of the text, split the other one into two and make the following modifications in bold. What do you think about that:
I'm sorry to tell you that I really don't like this version very much. It reads as very awkward and does not flow smoothly. In my opinion, it would need some rewriting to be better. Perhaps:


I developed an interest in intellectual property over the course of my professional career, and while consulting for multinational companies such as X Inc. and Y Inc., where I investigated and worked on research projects in the fields of nanotechnology and nanomaterials, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ceramic and glass materials. I believe that working as a patent attorney would afford me the opportunity to further my knowledge and skills in these and other fields within materials science and engineering, and apply them to understanding and critically analysing client's inventions. This career path would also allow me to assist clients with any patent issues they may have.


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. I agree with your suggested modifications. If modified as suggested, do you think that it would be a good idea to put I developed an interest in intellectual property over the course of my professional career, ... at the beginning of the text, or at the end as in the original sentence?
Only one question: why do you think that it would be better to use the simple past developed than the present perfect have developed?
Topic: on vs in the fields of
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 5:01:30 AM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following (splitting the sentence(s), if you think they read better):
My suggestions, and this is but one way to do it:

I believe that working as a _____ would afford me the opportunity to further my knowledge and skills in materials science and engineering, and apply them to understanding and critically analyzing a client's inventions, as well as assisting them in exploring the path to obtaining patents and in dealing with all patenting issues. I developed an interest in intellectual property in the course of my academic and professional career while consulting for multinational companies such as Y Inc. and Z Inc. where I investigated and developed research projects in the fields of nanotechnology and nanomaterials, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ceramic and glass materials.


Hi , and thank you for your suggestions. I thought to move the second sentence at the beginning of the text, split the other one into two and make the following modifications in bold. What do you think about that:
I (have?) developed an interest in intellectual property throughout my academic and professional career, including (my consulting work)/(when consulting for) for multinational companies such as X Inc. and Y Inc., where/when (it should be referred also to my ... career) I investigated and worked on research projects in the fields of nanotechnology and nanomaterials, superconductors and semiconductors, as well as ceramic and glass materials. I believe that working as a patent attorney would afford me the opportunity to further my knowledge and skills in (these and other fields)/(these fields and other) within materials science and engineering, and apply them to understanding and critically analysing a client's inventions. It/(This career path) would also allow me to assist clients in exploring the path to obtaining patents and in dealing with all patenting issues.
Topic: on vs in the fields of
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 4:55:08 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Remember that Patents clerk back in 1905?



Hi Drago, I know that and him.
Topic: on vs in the fields of
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018 10:49:08 AM
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following (splitting the sentence(s), if you think they read better):
I believe that working/(pursuing a career) as a patent attorney would afford me the opportunity to further my knowledge and skills in materials science and engineering and apply them (in order?) to both understand/understanding and critically analyse/analyzing a client's inventions, and/(as well as) assist/assisting them in exploring the path to obtaining patents and in dealing with all patenting issues. I developed my/the/an interest in intellectual property in the course of my academic and professional career and while consulting for multinational companies such as Y Inc. and Z Inc. when/where I investigated and developed research projects on/(in the fields of) nanotechnology and nanomaterials, (on/of?, do you need it?) superconductors and semiconductors and (on/of?) ceramic and glass materials.
Topic: wide/broad
Posted: Friday, June 22, 2018 10:23:49 AM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
Perhaps I'm being overly precise, but I found "prefer to pursue her career" creating a lot of questions in my mind. Perhaps you can clear them for me.
She would "prefer" — over what? Usually one prefers one thing over another for a favorable reason, but I don't see the other thing.

And is she "pursuing", or seeking to advance? Does she already have a career she is seeking to advance, or is she seeking to pursue a career in X insurance?

Also, you state she wants this because of two things: one, it will allow her to develop a wealth of skills, and two, these skills will be tailored to the specific needs of clients. Of those two, I would think the clients needs take priority in the hiring process, so I'd focus on that.

So, assuming she desires a career in the X Insurance industry, I would suggest:


In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, where a broad range of insurance experience and skills can be developed and specifically tailored to a client's business. Moreover, the X insurance sector is expecting an improved performance overall in the next few years, with the motor insurance industry in particular, because of significant changes in legislation, such as the announced revised Y rate and the Z.


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions. Yes, you are correct, she desires a career in the X Insurance industry. The use of prefer is due to the fact that in the previous sentences she explained that she wants to work in the Insurance sector, and then, within it, she prefers X Insurance.
Ah, ok. That helps.

With regard to the first sentence, if you want to include because of the broad range of insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.) covered/(this industry includes/comprises), is it correct to modify it, as follows (or, would you suggest a different phrasing?):
I would move the word "covered", and if you like, include the types in parenthesis):

"In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, because of the broad range of covered insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.), where a wide spectrum of experience ([uncountable]optional; I see no problem including it) and skills can be developed that are specifically tailored to a client's business.

In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, because of the broad range of insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.) covered/(this industry includes/comprises), where a wide spectrum of (experiences and, do you need it?) skills can be developed and specifically tailored to [b]a client's
(or [b]clients'?
) business.
What is the difference in meaning between ... the X insurance sector is expecting an improved performance ... and ... the X insurance sector is expected to achieve an improved performance ...?

In the X insurance sector is "expecting an improved performance", the idea is that the market is expected to improve because of trending conditions.

In "the X insurance sector is expected to achieve an improved performance", the idea is that the sector itself is causing/accomplishing the improved performance. I simply doubted that any niche part of the market can accomplish that feat, so I went with the other idea.


Thank you, FounDit. I would only please ask you if it would be incorrect to replace that are with which are in:
"... because of the broad range of covered insurance areas (...), where a wide spectrum of experience and skills can be developed which are specifically tailored to a client's business.".
If, instead, you write:
" ... because of the broad range of covered insurance areas (...), where a wide spectrum of experience and skills can be developed and specifically tailored to a client's business.",
what would it be the difference in meaning? And, would it be correct?
Topic: wide/broad
Posted: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 5:29:53 PM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
Perhaps I'm being overly precise, but I found "prefer to pursue her career" creating a lot of questions in my mind. Perhaps you can clear them for me.
She would "prefer" — over what? Usually one prefers one thing over another for a favorable reason, but I don't see the other thing.

And is she "pursuing", or seeking to advance? Does she already have a career she is seeking to advance, or is she seeking to pursue a career in X insurance?

Also, you state she wants this because of two things: one, it will allow her to develop a wealth of skills, and two, these skills will be tailored to the specific needs of clients. Of those two, I would think the clients needs take priority in the hiring process, so I'd focus on that.

So, assuming she desires a career in the X Insurance industry, I would suggest:


In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, where a broad range of insurance experience and skills can be developed and specifically tailored to a client's business. Moreover, the X insurance sector is expecting an improved performance overall in the next few years, with the motor insurance industry in particular, because of significant changes in legislation, such as the announced revised Y rate and the Z.


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions. Yes, you are correct, she desires a career in the X Insurance industry. The use of prefer is due to the fact that in the previous sentences she explained that she wants to work in the Insurance sector, and then, within it, she prefers X Insurance.
With regard to the first sentence, if you want to include because of the broad range of insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.) covered/(this industry includes/comprises), is it correct to modify it, as follows (or, would you suggest a different phrasing?):
In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, because of the broad range of insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.) covered/(this industry includes/comprises), where a wide spectrum of (experiences and, do you need it?) skills can be developed and specifically tailored to a client's (or clients'?) business.
What is the difference in meaning between ... the X insurance sector is expecting an improved performance ... and ... the X insurance sector is expected to achieve an improved performance ...?
Topic: wide/broad
Posted: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 11:07:43 AM
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
Perhaps I'm being overly precise, but I found "prefer to pursue her career" creating a lot of questions in my mind. Perhaps you can clear them for me.
She would "prefer" — over what? Usually one prefers one thing over another for a favorable reason, but I don't see the other thing.

And is she "pursuing", or seeking to advance? Does she already have a career she is seeking to advance, or is she seeking to pursue a career in X insurance?

Also, you state she wants this because of two things: one, it will allow her to develop a wealth of skills, and two, these skills will be tailored to the specific needs of clients. Of those two, I would think the clients needs take priority in the hiring process, so I'd focus on that.

So, assuming she desires a career in the X Insurance industry, I would suggest:


In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, where a broad range of insurance experience and skills can be developed and specifically tailored to a client's business. Moreover, the X insurance sector is expecting an improved performance overall in the next few years, with the motor insurance industry in particular, because of significant changes in legislation, such as the announced revised Y rate and the Z.


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions. Yes, you are correct, she desires a career in the X Insurance industry. The use of prefer is due to the fact that in the previous sentences she explained that she wants to work in the Insurance sector, and, then, within it, she prefer X Insurance.
With regard to the first sentence, if you want to include because of the wide/broad range of insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.) covered/(this industry includes/comprises), is it correct to modify it, as follows (or, would you suggest a different phrasing):
In particular, she would prefer to pursue a career in X Insurance, because of the wide/broad range of insurance areas (motor, property, casualty, etc.) covered/(this industry includes/comprises), where a broad range of work experiences and skills can be developed and specifically tailored to a client's (or clients') business.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.