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Profile: palapaguy
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User Name: palapaguy
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Joined: Monday, October 28, 2013
Last Visit: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:30:44 AM
Number of Posts: 1,689
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: open or opened
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:30:06 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
This free event is opened to the public and people are encouraged to attend it wearing red.

Attendees can also expect to listen to Singapore Democratic Party’s potential candidates speak at the event, while they picnic and have fun with friends and family.

Should it be "open" instead?

Many thanks!


Absolutely!

Topic: hire/hired car
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:26:30 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
This is a hire/hired car.

Which is the correct word?

Thanks.


I'm not one, but I believe BE speakers would say "a hired car." Or, "rented car" in AE."



Topic: a participle can be a noun (original and derived nouns)
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 11:24:37 AM
#3 is a very common use of the word "youth" in AE.

Topic: <switch off the light> vs. <switch the light off>
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 10:44:00 PM
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) Could you switch off the light?
[From Swan's Practical English Usage, 3rd ed., 21.1.]

(2) Could you switch the light off?

Is it OK to use #2 if the light has previously been referred to (e.g., "This light consumes a lot of electricity.")?


Interesting question! I think they're equally correct and common in either case.

Topic: fair tousled hair [what does the expression 'fair + determiner/adjective, etc' mean]
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 1:34:09 AM
A cooperator wrote:
Hi,
what does the expression 'fair + determiner/adjective, etc' mean? Is it an adverb functioning like 'a little bit'
I know that 'fair few' as said below:
In this part of the world, the expression "a fair few" is widely used to mean quite a lot. It's the kind of phrase used by people who don't want to sound over-enthusiastic - farmers, for example: "Have you got many sheep on the mountain?" "Aye, a fair few - around 600."

fair + determiner
- I have loved English grammar for many years, and my personal library contains most grammars published since 1586 for BrE, with a fair few from 1785 onwards for AmE.

fair + adjectival participial:
- a girl with blue eyes and fair tousled hair. [I know that 'tousle' to make something untidy, especially hair.] But, 'fair' confuses me.


Coop, Google "fair hair." You can do that by yourself. Easily.

Topic: 'No further details are given medical students about..'[Ditransitive verbs(verbs with two objects)]
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 1:22:01 AM
WOW!!

https://www.google.com/search?client=ubuntu&hs=jko&sxsrf=ACYBGNSCxnu9nVsfBg5yMvJ6ux3FzaS2Zg%3A1570684825245&ei=mb-eXfnFDovaswXvtaPgCg&q=entitlement&oq=entitlement&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.35i39i70i249j0i7i30j0i131i67j0i7i30l7.208713.210977..227486...0.3..0.357.1175.4j4j0j1......0....1..gws-wiz.......0i71j35i304i39j0i13j0i7i10i30j0i30j0i8i30.-5OSZ4Si0us
Topic: a participle can be a noun (original and derived nouns)
Posted: Monday, October 7, 2019 11:51:21 PM
A cooperator wrote:

But, why do you think we need to have two phrases having the same meaning 'the visually challenged' and 'impaired' at once in the same sentence? In other words, it's enough to have either 'the visually challenged' or 'the visually impaired'


No. It's not enough in quality writing. Avoiding unnecessary repetition of words in written English adds to the quality and increases reader interest in the text. I try to do that when possible in my writing.

Topic: Rachel has <a><the> habit of speaking her mind.
Posted: Monday, October 7, 2019 11:33:41 PM
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) Rachel has a habit of speaking her mind.

(2) Rachel has the habit of speaking her mind.

Which is correct?


Both are common and correct.

Topic: 'I owe him money' - 'He is owed money' [Ditransitive verbs (verbs with two objects)]
Posted: Monday, October 7, 2019 11:28:45 PM
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
The word you use for someone that/who is owed money is the creditor.


The active form using "owe" would be:

The word you use for someone that/who(m) someone owes money is the creditor.

But that is obviously a very awkward sentence!


This is what I tried to avoid in my answer.
Topic: 'I owe him money' - 'He is owed money' [Ditransitive verbs (verbs with two objects)]
Posted: Monday, October 7, 2019 9:04:50 PM
A cooperator wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
The word you use for someone that/who is owed money is the creditor. Correct.

The word you use for someone that/who owes money is the debtor. Correct.


Thanks a lot,
Could you please help me make the underlined passive form into the active form:
The word you use for someone that/who is owed money is the creditor.



The word you use for someone that/who lends money is the creditor.


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