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Profile: capitán
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User Name: capitán
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests: Literature, Philology, Philosophy, History, Languages, Tolkien, Travelling, Parkour, JKD, etc
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, February 18, 2013
Last Visit: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 12:45:20 PM
Number of Posts: 429
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Be still my heart; thou hast known worse than this.
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 12:44:38 PM
Thinking about dealing with all those men who pretended to take his wife and kingdom...
...it was simply nothing in comparison with ALL he had gone through athwart his Odyssey.

With the thoughts of such a troublesome homecoming and a racing heart,
I guess he just needed to remind himself the man of cunning,
the resourceful hero so many a time he had proven to be.
Topic: Grant Wood (1891)
Posted: Monday, February 13, 2017 1:43:56 PM


http://www.holytaco.com/25-funny-american-gothic-portraits/
Topic: Although men are accused for not knowing their own weakness, yet perhaps as few know their own strength. It is in men as in...
Posted: Sunday, November 06, 2016 3:44:17 PM
Knowing our weaknesses
is more difficult than most people think.

Knowing our strengths
is more difficult than knowing our weaknesses.

I reckon.

Topic: The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.
Posted: Friday, October 07, 2016 10:28:50 PM
There is nothing rational about loving our enemies.
In fact, I believe it´s even impossible.

Anyone who claims to love their enemies
is simple short on the definition of love (if it could actually be defined).
Topic: To believe in a child is to believe in the future. Through their aspirations they will save the world. With their combined...
Posted: Friday, March 11, 2016 10:46:01 AM
pedro wrote:
Daemon wrote:
To believe in a child is to believe in the future. Through their aspirations they will save the world. With their combined knowledge the turbulent seas of hate and injustice will be calmed. They will champion the causes of life's underdogs, forging a society without class discrimination. They will supply humanity with music and beauty as it has never known. They will endure.

Henry James (1843-1916)


as pithy as usual


You tell me... i live in El Salvador.
Topic: I am certain that after the dust of centuries has passed over our cities, we, too, will be remembered not for victories or...
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2016 10:55:57 AM
pedro wrote:
He's wrong of course. It isn't the contributions to human spirit that are taught in history lessons; It's battles and politics, but then we know he probably didn't write this.


I was about to write down exactly what you wrote here...
How much history is true and how much is not?

Topic: 'Tis the good reader that makes the good book; a good head cannot read amiss: in every book he finds passages which seem...
Posted: Friday, August 21, 2015 2:54:21 PM
Daemon wrote:
'Tis the good reader that makes the good book; a good head cannot read amiss: in every book he finds passages which seem confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakably meant for his ear.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


Henry David Thoreau said once something on the matter of reading books...

“To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will tax the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem. It requires a training such as the athletes underwent, the steady intention almost of the whole life to this object. Books must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written.”

And Emerson also said...

"Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us or we find it not."

I have pondered over these words for a long time.
And I sincerely consider that books, paintings, music,
every kind of art that elevates the hearts and minds of men
are just physical objects like ink on paper or canvas with colors spread on its surface.

It is us, our hearts and minds that make it happen; we set free the wonders hidden in a physical plain.
Therefore, to a certain extent, yes, it is the reader that makes the book; and the beauty lies in the eye of the beholder, right?

However, eyes are needed to discern good words or beauty,
but without any good words or beauty to gaze at... what good are the eyes for?

Topic: A smile is the chosen vehicle for all ambiguities.
Posted: Wednesday, August 19, 2015 1:31:20 PM
Daemon wrote:
A smile is the chosen vehicle for all ambiguities.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)


You think so?

Topic: Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2015 5:20:25 PM
FounDit wrote:
What is surprising is how much we enjoy our fear. We will often refuse to give it up, even when we have opportunity to do so. So the ultimate irony seems to be that we are afraid of being free of fear...Think


Fear has long been the most powerful weapon of mankind.
When men harness fear, knives and guns are of no significance.
That is the reason why churches are so popular.
Yes, "god" has always wielded that power over so many.
Fear, guilt and shame are the only weapons religion needs to exert domain over so many.

Yet, some of us have the power of actually admiring the gargoyles outside the church,
and prefer it over the demons that lurk inside that institution.
Topic: Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2015 2:20:48 PM
Yes, most people reckon these words from Franklin Roosevelt's inaugural address in March, 1933.
"The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

However, Henry David Thoreau wrote about fearing fear before.
"Nothing is so much to be fear as fear."

Then, we have the Duke of Wellington around 1832 who also wrote about fear:
"The only thing I am afraid of is fear."

Also, Francis Bacon transmitted the same message about fearing fear itself
"Nothing is terrible execpt fear itself."

Before they, one man wrote this in the first place, Michel de Montaigne in the renaissance:
"The thing of which I have most to fear is fear," about 1580.

Michel de Montaigne was an influence for many of the great men we know of nowadays.
It is no surprise that these words have been recycled by them.

Anyway, great men of history are great because they stand on the shoulder of giants, right?

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