The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: cisum
About
User Name: cisum
Forum Rank: Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Friday, February 15, 2013
Last Visit: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 2:20:10 PM
Number of Posts: 71
[0.01% of all post / 0.04 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Please explain the difference between the two expressions
Posted: Sunday, August 06, 2017 1:32:55 PM
Hi,
What's the difference between a career plan and career path? Could you please give examples of them?

Thank you very much.
Topic: please explain what it means
Posted: Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:30:25 AM
thar wrote:
None of these are actually very good explanations of the phrasal verb, but:

tfd
[quote]get through

vb
1. to succeed or cause or help to succeed in an examination, test, etc

2. to bring or come to a destination, esp after overcoming problems: we got through the blizzards to the survivors.



But here, getting through life is means succeeding by surviving, against obstacles.

Hi thar,
Do you mean they can't survive without running?

Thanks.
Topic: please explain what it means
Posted: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 7:26:30 AM
Hi,
What does 'get through life' mean in this sentence?

"All of a sudden running became this powerful tool I could use to help us get through life."

Thanks.
Topic: please explain the meanings of these sentences.
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 12:21:07 AM
Hi DragOnspeaker,

Thank you for your great example.

The disaster in "I didn't mean to, but I set myself up for disaster." hasn't happened yet when the speaker said it, right?
Topic: please explain the meanings of these sentences.
Posted: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 10:11:36 AM
HiDragOn,

Would you please give me a context about the sentence:
I didn’t mean to, but I set myself up for disaster.

Thank you very much.
Topic: please explain the meanings of these sentences.
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 10:14:01 AM
Hi,

What do the sentences mean?
1.I didn’t mean to, but I set myself up for disaster.
2.Don’t set yourself up for disappointment. Be realistic with your expectations.

Thank you for your help.
Topic: true
Posted: Tuesday, March 08, 2016 5:06:26 AM
Hi sureshot,

Is there any subtle difference between the two expressions in meaning in this example?

"If that (info) is true/the case then I will be very ​disappointed."

Thank you very much.
Topic: true
Posted: Monday, March 07, 2016 3:18:28 AM
sureshot wrote:

However, in another context, the words "case" and "true" can be use interchangeably. Here is an example from the following site/dictionary:

CASE:
(not) the case
B1 (not) ​true:
If that is the case then I will be very ​disappointed.

SOURCE: case Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/case


Hi sureshot,

What's the difference between 'if that's (not)the case' and 'if that's (not)true' in the given example above?

Thanks a lot.
Topic: true
Posted: Sunday, March 06, 2016 7:53:13 PM
sureshot wrote:

(4) Like Stanley Gehrt, Savage is using stable isotope analysis to find out how much the ants rely on human food. "Most of their carbon is coming from human food. That is not the case for the ones living in forests, " she says.


Hi sureshot,

Is it OK to use 'that's not true' instead of 'that's not the case' here? And what's the subtle difference between them here?

Thanks.
Topic: true
Posted: Thursday, March 03, 2016 3:16:09 AM
Romany wrote:
Cisum -

As they usually refer to a "set of conditions" as SS says; when we use "That's not the case" it's usually because WE are going to explain our side of the story, or interpretation of events.


Hi Romany,
Could you please give an example of 'that's not the case'?

Thanks.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.