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Profile: palix
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User Name: palix
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Joined: Sunday, February 3, 2013
Last Visit: Friday, September 20, 2013 3:58:32 PM
Number of Posts: 9
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Topic: A single English word for this phrase in Quotes
Posted: Friday, September 20, 2013 3:56:26 PM


OK, dann zwei Worte. wobei vielleicht zweite 'himself' ist, wie in 'annoyed himself'. Vielleicht fällt dir etwas besseres ein.
Topic: A single English word for this phrase in Quotes
Posted: Friday, September 20, 2013 3:51:43 PM

OK, dann zwei Worte. wobei vielleicht zweite 'himself' ist, wie in 'annoyed himself'. Vielleicht fällt dir etwas besseres ein.
Topic: A single English word for this phrase in Quotes
Posted: Tuesday, September 17, 2013 3:21:38 PM
Er "ärgerte sich", weil er sein Auto nicht rechtzeitig gewaschen hat.
Sonst hätte er beim Verkauf einen grösseren Preis erzielen können.

Topic: Translation to German.
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 3:51:33 PM
An excellent translation. It sounds like an original German poem.
It couldn't be done better. Hut ab.
Topic: Is my answer correct?
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2013 8:17:00 AM
How about "if the machines are defect, you can return them to us." ?
I think "defective" has another meaning.
Topic: slip in -ing
Posted: Saturday, March 16, 2013 1:01:25 PM
thar wrote:
Yep. The only difference is that you can use 'while' for anything that happened at the same time, and 'in' only when the two are fundamenetally connected.

eg
the fox sang while climbing the fence
while 'in' connects the two together, a sort of cause and effect (he could only slip because he was climbing)
the fox slipped in climbing the fence.

Something like that. Like so many prepositions, it is almost impossible to describe except in itself!!


The sentence I find somewhat ambiguous. While agreeing with other commentators, I could also read it like "the fox slipped in (to somewhere)
after climbing the fence". Don't you think so?
Topic: Right side and left (wrong) side.
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2013 3:23:06 PM
I am physical scientist by profession. When it came to write practical records about an experimental setup in the physics lab, we always used 'right-hand-side' to describe the side. In technical writings of others I frequently read things like 'in the right side of the picture'. I am not a grammarian, but my common sense suggests that you must write 'right-hand-side' if the preceding word does not give a clear indication of the side to be the context. Consider about the following (funny) example sentences that illustrate what I try to explain:
1) “In almost all Common Wealth countries the right side of the road to drive your vehicle is the left.”
2) “After 100 meters turn right.”
3) “Turn left right now.”

Can someone tell what is right? I mean whether you should always write 'right-hand-side' if you are referring to side.
Topic: What are these fruits called in English?
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2013 3:44:13 PM
I think it is very likely Pomelo.
Topic: Among or Amongst
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2013 3:40:06 PM
What is wrong with the word, "among", which I came across while I was young. Today I see everywhere only "amongst".
Is the word, "among", somehow deprecated?

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