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Profile: towan52
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User Name: towan52
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Sufferable Pendant
Interests: Fine Wine and Ales
Gender: Male
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Joined: Tuesday, August 28, 2012
Last Visit: Thursday, May 24, 2018 11:21:59 AM
Number of Posts: 1,712
[0.19% of all post / 0.82 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: or vs nor
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2018 10:37:15 AM
Generally speaking, if we are expressing something in the negative, "nor" is probably best. If it follows "neither" then it has to be "nor" IMO!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: to broil
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2018 10:25:41 AM
To confuse the issue, here in the colonies they refer to a barbecue as a "grill" or a "pit" Whistle

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: I cant believe it! Fifteen years have passed
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 12:02:25 PM
With the possible exception of the last sentence, all are grammatically correct. Starting a sentence with "and" (a conjunction) may be considered poor grammar but it can be useful; particularly for emphasis. Having said that, as a piece of text, it's very staccato. The piece could be smoothed out a lot by combining some of the sentences.

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: Shouldn't it be 'have predicted' instead?
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 4:05:52 PM
No, it's okay. Inserting a comma seems to help:
How could anyone at this gathering predict that, four years later, Anwar would be stripped of his positions as deputy prime minister and finance minister ...

Changing it to "have predicted" would work as well.

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: Idioms of the Day
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:02:38 AM
I agree - never heard "nice as ninepence" until now - it was always "right". "Nice" sounds like a nine-bob note!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:57:16 AM
pjharvey wrote:
From a grammar point of view it should be "How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and come back to Barcelona?" ("come" as an infinitive, just like "finish").
However, I don't think it sounds natural for a native speaker.
I'd say something like "When did you come back to Barcelona from your Easter holidays?".

Ooops, just realized we posted at the same time, towan - and it seems we perfectly agree!


They say that, "Great minds think alike" but they also say that, "Fools seldom differ". Whistle

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:40:32 AM
No, it doesn't work as it is. Also "came" should be "come". It is understandable, but not natural. Most people would say something like. "When did you get back to Barcelona after the Easter break?"

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: loud and loudly
Posted: Thursday, May 10, 2018 11:19:17 AM
It is my sincere belief that, about halfway across the Atlantic Ocean, the crew of the Mayflower jettisoned most adverbs into the sea. On the eastern side of the midpoint, they sank slowly. To to west, however, they sank slow.

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: original or original copy
Posted: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 5:22:11 PM
I may be totally wrong, but taken separately, the words can have opposite meanings; taken together, it is usually interpreted as the "first". For example, the original Magna Carta (a sort of thinking man's bill of rights Whistle ) was what KJ signed. Copies were then made! Welcome to the English language!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Topic: others'
Posted: Tuesday, May 1, 2018 10:33:43 AM
Completely off topic - but the Indian reference reminded me. I heard a radio commercial the other day making a play on the two syllables of the word "shampoo". The first part being "sham" meaning fake, not genuine etc. the second syllable we needn't dwell on. The idea though that we are rubbing fake fæces in our hair prompted me to look up the origin of the word. It appears to be derived from a Hindi/Sanskrit word that means "massage". Don't you feel better for knowing that!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"

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