The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Koh Elaine
About
User Name: Koh Elaine
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, July 04, 2012
Last Visit: Monday, February 19, 2018 12:26:32 AM
Number of Posts: 3,108
[0.36% of all post / 1.51 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: was or is
Posted: Monday, February 19, 2018 12:12:04 AM
Thanks, NKM.

Can 'was' and 'former' be used together?
Topic: Is the first sentence in British English?
Posted: Monday, February 19, 2018 12:01:18 AM
I like oranges, apples and oranges.
I like oranges, apples, and oranges.

I was taught that the first sentence without a comma after 'apples' is British English, while the second is American English.

Do native speakers observe this distinction?

Thanks.
Topic: Opposite of 'confident'?
Posted: Sunday, February 18, 2018 10:50:54 PM
What is the opposite of 'confident'? Both
'inconfident' and 'unconfident' are found in dictionaries.

Thanks.
Topic: Opposite of 'confident'?
Posted: Sunday, February 18, 2018 10:50:52 PM
What is the opposite of 'confident'? Both
'inconfident' and 'unconfident' are found in dictionaries.

Thanks.
Topic: was or is
Posted: Sunday, February 18, 2018 8:49:05 PM
Nikolas Cruz, 19, killed 17 people on Wednesday at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He was a former student there. More than a dozen people were also wounded in the deadliest shooting at a US high school.

Cruz was investigated by police and state officials as far back as 2016 after slashing his arm in a social media video, and saying he wanted to buy a gun, but authorities determined he was receiving sufficient support.

Shouldn't it be "is" instead?

Thanks.
Topic: America vs British English
Posted: Saturday, February 17, 2018 1:43:18 PM
KE - do you understand where 'one' is used in different contexts, and which person it is a pronoun for?
One has to be aware of where one uses it.
But it is a useful pronoun.

I have read in an English usage book that, in British English, if we start with "one", we have to use "one" throughout the sentence. We cannot use "he" in that sentence. I remember reading that Americans use an initial "one" but the subsequent pronoun is "he" throughout that sentence.

I wonder if British native speakers follow the "one" rule.
Topic: America vs British English
Posted: Saturday, February 17, 2018 12:30:54 AM
1. One must do one's best in whatever one does.

2. One must do his best in whatever he does.

Is the first sentence the American version, while the second is the British?

Thanks.

Topic: America vs British English
Posted: Saturday, February 17, 2018 12:30:53 AM
1. One must do one's best in whatever one does.

2. One must do his best in whatever he does.

Is the first sentence the American version, while the second is the British?

Thanks.

Note: Please ignore this duplicate post. I don't understand. I posted once, and there
are two posts, instead. This happened in an earlier post too.
Topic: Is a second "as" required?
Posted: Friday, February 16, 2018 10:27:58 PM
In American English "practice" is used as a noun and (as) a verb.

Is a second "as" required?

Thanks.
Topic: fix or fixed
Posted: Friday, February 16, 2018 8:29:11 PM
Thanks to all of you.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.