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Profile: vkhu
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User Name: vkhu
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Joined: Monday, June 18, 2012
Last Visit: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 5:32:42 AM
Number of Posts: 782
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: God is in the details, yes, but in ALL the details big and small
Posted: Saturday, June 16, 2018 5:50:22 AM
Quote:
I waffle back and forth between thinking my life would be safer and easier if I had another job and feeling like things like that don’t matter. God is in the details, yes, but in ALL the details big and small. And He knows the course He has set for me.

Context: a cop is contemplating quitting the force.

Generally, I can tell this man is on the fence about changing job, and ultimately decided that it doesn't matter since if fate wants him to die, he will die regardless. What I don't get is the specifics of the sentence in bold. The one that follow suggests it should be taken literally. But how could something like God resides in all things, big and small, fit with the preceding sentence?
Topic: beating lavender blooms
Posted: Saturday, June 16, 2018 2:49:33 AM
Quote:
My interpretation, bet others have different interpretations, which is kind of what this kind of writing is meant to cause.

It's a pain for translators like me though. Can't see how I could get this one across without adding a quarter page of footnote.
Topic: beating lavender blooms
Posted: Friday, June 15, 2018 10:45:08 PM
Quote:
Dalton, flirting with me. Something I have to get used to—my heart, beating lavender blooms, spilling out into my bloodstream. His flirting calms me, makes me feel safe.

Lavender can't grow in my country so I'm having trouble getting this metaphor. If the lady's heart is "beating lavender blooms," how exactly is it beating? And what spills out into her bloodstream, the smell or the lavender itself?
Topic: hospitality ministry
Posted: Sunday, June 10, 2018 5:06:35 AM
That's interesting. So basically it would be a charity department of some kind within the church, right?

And since the novel take place in Louisville, Kentucky, this term is probably more commonly used on the Western part of the US.
Topic: hospitality ministry
Posted: Sunday, June 10, 2018 4:32:03 AM
Quote:
He asked me if it was okay for him to ask someone at our church about the hospitality ministry and Eamon’s mom about the one at her church too because new moms needed meals delivered.

This is an excerpt from a novel called Whiskey & Ribbons by Leesa Cross-Smith. Basically the lady made too much food, and her not-boyfriend is asking if it's ok to contact the church they works at about something called "hospitality ministry" to deal with them all.

What is this "hospitality ministry" thing? When I look it up on Google, it seems this refer to showing newcomers the love of God or something like that. But how does that fit in with this context?
Topic: put up the paper
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 2:43:04 PM
Quote:
Later after we’d finished the cake, Evi focused her attention on me. I looked at the starry diamond on her left finger. Eamon put up the paper all right. It was huge. I could almost smell how expensive it was from across the table—a whiff of something clean and clear-blue.

Context: Eamon just proposed to Evi, and she said yes.

I can't find anything for "put up the paper." The closest definition I can find is for "put down the paper," which means "to resign." Since earlier, there was reference to Eamon taking himself "off the market" (getting married), could "put up the paper" be interpreted as "put down the paper"? As in, Eamon had truly "resigned from his bachelor life"?
Topic: leaning cop
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 12:10:03 PM
I'm still a bit on the fence about this. From the excerpt, Eamon seemes to do the "leaning cop" routine a lot. Then does that mean he always leans against something every time he visits the shop?
Topic: D-Money
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 11:29:04 AM
Quote:
Eamon stopped by. He stopped by a lot, happily played the role of leaning cop, drinking coffee.

“You’re such a cliché,” I said to him.

“Body of a god and a ten-inch cock or cop drinking coffee? Both? Let’s go with both,” he said.

“If you’ve got ten inches I’ve got fourteen,” I said, closing the register. We were only talking like this because the shop was empty. A customer had just picked up his bike and left. My only other employee, my buddy, Detroit had the day off.

D! D-Money. Come on, bruh. Come on.” Eamon laughed at me, shook his head.


Context: 2 brothers enjoying some friendly banter. This is an excerpt from the novel Whiskey & Ribbons by Leesa Cross-Smith.

What's D-Money? I don't see any definition on Urban Dictionary that would fit, and the majority of the search results are about a type of British money (this book's set in Kentucky, which is about as anti-British as it gets).
Topic: leaning cop
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 10:54:08 AM
Quote:
Eamon stopped by. He stopped by a lot, happily played the role of leaning cop, drinking coffee.

Context: Eamon is a police officer, stopping by his adopted brother's bike shop. These two are very close. This is just a social call, and Eamon isn't investigating a case or anything like that.

I don't get what a "leaning cop" is. It doesn't sound like Eamon is physically leaning against something, and Google, as reliable as ever in such matters, could find nothing on it. Is this a police slang of some kind?
Topic: sea-god timbres in the blue of Noah’s cry
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 5:21:40 AM
Quote:
Dalton’s lips. They weren’t Eamon’s. Eamon’s mouth was fuller. He had a bottom lip I could’ve chewed on for a week. I could still feel it between my teeth. Eamon was gone forever, but he was everywhere. How did that happen? I even heard his sea-god timbres in the blue of Noah’s cry.

Some context: Eamon is the late husband of the narrator. Noah is their newborn son.

I have no idea what kind of imagery this metaphor is supposed to evoke. This is just a normal romance novel, no fantasy element of any kind. So what kind of timbres is "sea-god" and why would the cry of a baby described as "blue"?

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