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Profile: woj
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User Name: woj
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Joined: Tuesday, June 05, 2012
Last Visit: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 6:23:14 AM
Number of Posts: 7
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The veiled mistress
Posted: Tuesday, January 06, 2015 6:05:43 AM
it may be hard to explain without any context. on the other hand, it may simply mean "sekretny, ukryty przed światem"?
Topic: I have heard men talk of the blessings of freedom, ... but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that...
Posted: Monday, April 08, 2013 12:32:49 PM
As for me - very intriguing quote. Here is one of my favourites: "Freedom is being able to choose your master". The author is Colombian thinker Nicolas Gomez Davila. In fact, we always serve somebody.
Topic: I'll order a pizza, shall I? - is this correct?
Posted: Sunday, July 29, 2012 2:12:53 PM
Thanks for all answers.

The exercise comes from Mann and Taylore-Knowles's book "Destination C1 & C2. Grammar & vocabulary with answer key" edited by MACMILLAN. It is exercise C.11 from unit 5, and the answer is "I will order a pizza, shall I?".

From what you have written I conclude this is either a seldom used construction or simply an error in answer key.
Topic: I'll order a pizza, shall I? - is this correct?
Posted: Sunday, July 29, 2012 12:14:09 PM
FounDit wrote:

If the answer was: "I will order a pizza, shall I"?, it seems a very strange answer to me. As I read the construction, it seemed to me that, since a question mark is present, a question should be asked, choosing between the two words in parentheses.

I would have formed the question like this: "Shall I order a pizza?" The order that is suggested as correct seems very wrong as it makes a statement, then reorders it as a question. No one I know would use this wording.

Edit: Your answer: "I shan't order a pizza, shall I" indicates you thought both words had to be used. Was this your understanding of the instructions?

a) here's an exact instruction: "write a short phrase using will, be going to, present simple or present continuous on the line to complete each sentence"

b) yes - as implied by a) - all words have to be used
Topic: I'll order a pizza, shall I? - is this correct?
Posted: Sunday, July 29, 2012 8:34:15 AM
Solving some english exercises recently, I've encountered odd, well, at least to me, construction. I had to write a sentence being given the following words: (I / order) a pizza, shall I? and the answer was: "I will order a pizza, shall I"? Is this right? My answer was: "I shan't order a pizza, shall I" and I admit following standard question tags rules here. Could anybody cast some light on this problem, please?
Topic: tasteless vs flavourless
Posted: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 6:25:26 AM
Thanks for all replies! I think I start to see the difference. Have a good day!
Topic: tasteless vs flavourless
Posted: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 3:01:45 AM
Hi, everybody! This is my first post and I'd like to greet you all. Getting down to business - is there any difference in meaning between "tastelss" and "flavourless"? Does "tasteless" mean "bland, without any spices and flavour enhancers" while "flavourless" means "too little spices or flavour enhancers"?

The article http://www.thefreedictionary.com/flavourless shows that "tasteless" is only "related" to "flavourless" but I must admit I can't catch the difference.

Thank you very much in advance! woj.

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