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Profile: rogermue
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User Name: rogermue
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: a former teacher of Englisch, mother language Germ
Interests: languages: English, French, Latin and others
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, January 28, 2012
Last Visit: Tuesday, April 12, 2016 6:50:46 AM
Number of Posts: 5,047
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: S-words? Use Latin
Posted: Sunday, April 03, 2016 12:48:30 PM
Hello Parser, can you provide a link to those Latin passages?
Topic: To + gerund
Posted: Tuesday, March 22, 2016 2:15:12 AM
As Dragon said the construction is "to be committed to sth/to doing sth", not to be committed
to do sth. It is no point noting down "to be committed to" as you don't know is it "to +infinitive"
or "to+noun/gerund".
Topic: The ten most beautiful ceilings in the world
Posted: Friday, March 18, 2016 6:43:03 AM
See this fascinating picture series of BBC Culture
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20160317-the-10-most-beautiful-ceilings-in-the-world
Topic: To a House Mouse
Posted: Wednesday, March 02, 2016 6:04:07 PM
Congratulation!
Topic: To a House Mouse
Posted: Wednesday, March 02, 2016 11:16:24 AM
Your own poem?
Topic: Writing
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2016 10:59:54 AM
One question to Priscilla. Excellent, how Indonesian handles plural
and tenses. Even Esperanto is not so simple. And English seems to have a
complicated grammar when compared with Indonesian.

Is there anything in Indonesian that is difficult for Europeans?
Topic: Umberto Eco Obituary -The Guardian
Posted: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 10:02:18 AM
@ Peter John O'Connor - Well, I'm a bit surprised as The Name of the Rose has
general acclaim, and the film as well.
Topic: Umberto Eco Obituary -The Guardian
Posted: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 8:39:38 AM
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/feb/20/umberto-eco-obituary
Topic: The verb to get and its multiple meanings
Posted: Sunday, February 21, 2016 2:57:44 PM
On the other forum someone had this objection.
How does "to get confused" fit into your two concepts?

He is right, to get has developed a use for passive and similar things.
But it is the concept of to get somewhere. If someone gets confused
he gets in a different state, a state of confusion or a confused state.
This is the way how to get develops its use for the get-passive.
Topic: The verb to get and its multiple meanings
Posted: Sunday, February 21, 2016 1:39:13 PM
This is a post I wrote on another forum about the multiple meanings
of the verb to get, only the transitive use. But as I know that here the reaction
is much more lively and more competent I transfer the post to this forum. Someone
complained about the many meanings of to get. I wrote:


I had a look at to get, transitive verb at The Free Dictionary. They have 16 numbers, most of them have several definitions. So I counted 37 definitions altogether.

That is only an optical thing. Semantically I found only two meanings. All 37 definitions can be reduced to two basic concepts:

1 - to get something

2 - to get somewhere and to get someone/something somewhere.

If your girl friend gets a baby or if you get a bullet in your arm or if the police got the gangster or if you got your nose broken - it is semantically the same idea.

But I admit it is very difficult to get away from detailed dictionary definitions and see the semantic concepts.

Of course, I'm sure that not everybody will agree with me. But please consider, an advanced learner or a native speaker manages to understand and handle all 37 uses of the dictionary. But in his head he doesn't have 37 definitions, he has only the two concepts I stated above.

On the one hand it is convenient that dictionaries give detailed definitions, on the other hand they present a wrong picture. What schools and textbooks fail to do it to foster semantic understanding.

--- What are the views of the members here?

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