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Profile: A cooperator
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User Name: A cooperator
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Occupation: A teaching assistant at a University
Interests: English
Gender: Male
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Joined: Thursday, October 27, 2011
Last Visit: Friday, April 26, 2019 7:43:45 AM
Number of Posts: 3,432
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: (The Phrases of 'although', 'In spite of' , 'Despite')
Posted: Monday, April 22, 2019 3:12:22 PM
Audiendus wrote:
Sorry to disagree with Y111, but:

Y111 wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Is it a rule that if 'in spite of/despite' is used with a clause, then we have to include 'the fact that'?

No.

I would say 'Yes'.

She came to the meeting in spite of/despite being ill.
She came to the meeting in spite of/despite the fact that she was ill.
She came to the meeting in spite of/despite she was ill.


A cooperator wrote:
do you think that 'aside from' can be used the same way 'despite' and 'in spite of' are used?

Yes.

Yes, it works the same way grammatically, although its meaning is different.

Aside from being a great singer, he is also an excellent violinist.
Aside from the fact that he is a great singer, he is also an excellent violinist.
Aside from he is a great singer, he is also an excellent violinist.


Thank you both of you,
Audiendus,
Also, I think that 'apart from' can be used the same way 'aside from', 'despite' and 'in spite of' are used? That is, "in spite of/despite/aside from" can be followed by either a noun, pronoun, gerund, or noun phrase, but they can never be followed by a clause which has a subject and a verb, and can be a subject or an object of another clause.

You don't think 'a clause' (esp a noun clause) can be a subject or an object for another clause. However, phrase cannot be. So, that is a rule of distinguishing a clause from a phrase.
For instance, "the scholarships which will be available at Robert Gordon University" looks as if it was a noun phrase having a relative clause underlined. But, as long as it follows the preposition 'apart from', it cannot be called a noun clause although it has a finite verb and subject.


Aside from their cuteness, their scarcity makes them important.
Please note that we cannot help you find sponsorship apart from the scholarships which will be available at Robert Gordon University.


I think 'aside from/despite/in spite of' work the same way grammatically, although their meaning are different.
However, 'aside from/apart from' can be interchangeable.


Someone(non-native speaker) who didn't hear of this rule, they might say the following since I think 'although' can be followed by a clause which has a subject and finite verb:
Please note that we cannot help you find sponsorship although the scholarships which will be available at Robert Gordon University.
However, the correct use is as follows:
Please note that we cannot help you find sponsorship although there are scholarships available at Robert Gordon University.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: the last place..., which is one reason domestic abuse is so confusing(Relative(adjectival) Clauses)
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 1:06:29 AM
I see the adjectival clause [that] is widely used is now so obvious that I could phrase this statement of mine by using it.
So, "I think "[that] you are sorry" is an adjectival clause.
There is a difference between the reason for something, and the thing [that] you are sorry has happened.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'I have been a fan.. because of how many he has achieved' (the Phrases of 'Because', 'Because of')
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 12:37:56 AM
The reason [that] I was late was the traffic.

But, I think "the reason" can be replaced with "why"
"Why I was late was the traffic."
Which raises another question which is as follows: As long as "why" is conjunction introducing a noun clause, how could "the reason" replace the conjunction "why" which enables the clause "why I was late" to function as a noun?
Can I compare "I know why he likes France." to that example?
I know the reason [that] he likes France.
The reason [that] he likes France is well-known.
He likes France is well-known.
He likes France is something I know.
You still have not told me when "conjunctions" are dropped, why are the sentences struck through? Someone can think of the conjunctions as if they are implied like "that" which usually is not mentioned/strictly written.
[That] he likes France is something I know."

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: the last place..., which is one reason domestic abuse is so confusing(Relative(adjectival) Clauses)
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 12:04:28 AM
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Audiendus,
So, in "You are happy with the way things are running now" can I consider '[that] things are running now' is an adjectival clause, not a noun clause, nor a relative clause. It modifies "the way"? So, it can be compared to the following:

.....which is one reason [that] domestic abuse is so confusing".
[That] domestic abuse is so confusing" (note the implied conjunction "that") is an adjectival clause, not a noun clause, nor a relative clause. It modifies "reason".

It is your insistence that it is (generally acceptable etc) that has prolonged this thread.


Yes, that is all correct.

Audiendus,
You think "[That] I was late" can be compared to the preceding adjectival clauses?
The reason [that] I was late was the traffic.

But, I think "the reason" can be replaced with "why"
"Why I was late was the traffic."
Which raises another question which is as follows: As long as "why" is conjunction introducing a noun clause, how could "the reason" replace the conjunction "why" which enables the clause "why I was late" to function as a noun?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: Why is 'I am sorry because I couldn't come to the class yesterday.' wrong
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 11:47:47 PM
Thar
I am having a trouble understanding the structure of your sentence below:
There is a difference between the reason for something, and the thing that you are sorry has happened.

I am wondering why you have omitted (NOT WRITTEN) 'about' in "....the thing that you are sorry about has happened." as long as the Michael Swan's grammar book, in the section prepositions before conjunctions', says that prepositions can be dropped before the conjunction 'that' after many common words that refer to emotional reactions:
We are sorry about the dealy.
We are sorry that the train is late. (Not ....sorry about that the train is late. )

However, 'that' is a relative pronoun (not a conjunction) in yours, and the propestion 'about' doesn't come before 'that'. So, why did you drop 'about' after 'sorry'?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'I have been a fan.. because of how many he has achieved' (the Phrases of 'Because', 'Because of')
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 11:27:18 PM
BobShilling wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
"I know how old you're"
"How old you're is something I know."
How old you're is known.


The contraction you're is incorrect in those sentences. You need you are.

The reason "you're" needs to be written "you are" would be quite helpful if mentioned.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: Is learning a language a matter of a learner being smart
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 9:51:36 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello.
This "it's a matter of" is a very specific phrase. I'd say it means something like "this is a situation of the type . . .". It is used to say that one thing, which is specific, shows a more general situation.

This apple is sweet.
"It's a matter of apples being sweet." or "It's a matter of an apple being sweet."
The general situation is that apples are sweet.

As thar has done, you may see the structure of the sentence better by looking at the statement version, rather than the question (in the sentences which are questions).

1. Is - subject - a matter of - subject complement? - question.
Subject - is - a matter of - subject complement. - statement.
Is learning a language a matter of a learner being smart? - Learning a language is a matter of a learner being smart.

2. Yes, it is a matter of a learner being smart.
This one is already a statement. As you say "It" would refer to an earlier sentence like sentence (1) above - "It" means "learning a language".

Dragonspeaker,
I still don't know what part of speech 'being' is in the following. Is it a gerund acting as subject complement?
Yes, it is a matter of a learner being smart.
"It's a matter of apples being sweet." or "It's a matter of an apple being sweet."
Is learning a language a matter of a learner being smart? - Learning a language is a matter of a learner being smart.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: Is learning a language a matter of a learner being smart
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 9:40:20 PM
thar wrote:
It might make more sense if you look at the statement then invert the word order to make the question.

Being smart is a good feature.



Is being smart a good feature?

Thank you, both of you, Drag0nspeaker and Thar
Wow! Thar, you mentioned a good idea.

But, 'being smart' isn't referring to any specific person(You, I, they, etc.)

Being quite enlightening is a wonderful thing.
Is being quite enlightening a wonderful thing?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'You are happy with the way things are running now' (Direct, Indirect Question and Statement)
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 9:02:50 PM
Could you please confirm this datum? Where the red colour is referring to subjects, blue colour is referring to verbs, and green colour is referring to objects/complements.
As far as I know, forming direct questions in English follows this rule: "Verb + Subject + Complement/Object". But, forming direct statement follows this rule: Subject + Verb + Complement/Object"

Positive Direct Question:
What made the road wet?
What makes the road wet?
What would make the road wet?
Who told you?
Who did you tell?
Would it be OK if I come tomorrow?
If I'd deleted 'it', then what would be the subject of the sentence?

Positive Direct Statement:
Rain makes the roads wet.
John told me.
I told John.

Indirect Positive Question:
Would you mind telling me who told you?
Would you mind telling me who you told?
If I'd deleted 'it', then do I know what the subject of the sentence would be?



Indirect Positive Statement:
I would know who told you.
I would know who you told.
If I'd deleted 'it', then I do know what the subject of the sentence would be.



Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'You are happy with the way things are running now' (Direct, Indirect Question and Statement)
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 8:37:17 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
1. But, you see that "That's OK now?" is an affirmative direct statement? However, "You're not happy with that?" is a negative direct statement?

No.
"That's OK now?" is a positive question (which are rarely used - and normally used to "lead" the other person into a positive answer).
"You're not happy with that?" is a negative question (which are rarely used, and are often used to show that the speaker really would be displeased by a negative answer).

Drag0nspeaker,
1. Could you let me know know what difference would be there between 'affirmative' and 'positive' (affirmative question Vs. Positive question or affirmative statement Vs. Positive statement)?

2. But as far as I know, forming direct questions in English follows this rule: "Verb + Subject + Complement/Object". But, forming a direct statement follows this rule: Subject + Verb + Complement/Object" So, "That's OK now?" follows the format of a direct statement.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.

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