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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, November 21, 2019 6:00:41 PM
Number of Posts: 12,094
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Set to
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 6:00:36 PM
NKM wrote:
In my region, "set-to" (meaning a disagreement) is fairly common. However, I wouldn't expect to see it spelled without a hyphen.
You're right. I don't know how I forgot the hyphen...d'oh!

The past participle "set" is often used as a synonym for "ready", as in "I was all set to pull on my uppers."



I'm not acquainted with "uppers" in that sense, though I may have heard the word in reference to dentures. (Upper plate?)



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: a pickle / cornichon / gherkin
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 5:58:59 PM
NKM wrote:
In American usage, as Sarrriesfan says, it is normally only cucumbers that become pickles.
Right. We have sweet pickles, dill pickles (ugh), and gherkins sold here.

Other foods may be pickled, but they're not "pickles". (I particularly enjoy pickled beets.)Ummm...pickled beets...good!



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: One likes to be respected as highly as his neighbors are.
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 2:11:45 PM
Bully_rus wrote:
Daemon wrote:
One likes to be respected as highly as his neighbors are.

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919)


Yeah. Some think that the neighbors are more important than relatives and friends… Is there some or more truth in this claim?


Well, we need to consider carefully the value we place on the opinions of any of our relatives or neighbors. After all, some of them may be fools.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: is good to use
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 12:07:32 PM
navi wrote:
Which are correct:


1) This method is good to use in extreme cases. Okay
2) This method is good for using in extreme cases.
3) This method is good to be used in extreme cases.

4) This method is good for solving problems of this kind.
Okay
5) This method is good to solve problems of this kind.

6) This jacket is good to wear in the summer.
Okay
7) This jacket is good for wearing in the summer.
8) This jacket is good to be worn in the summer.

Gratefully,
Navi


This sure looks like homework. I hope it isn't.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Set to
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 12:03:28 PM
narkom12 wrote:
Yes, you are quite right. I would like to know if 'set to'='started to do something' or ='set out to do something.'
I'm not familiar with using "set to" with that meaning. I'm more accustomed to hearing "set out to (do something)" or "started out to (do something).

(There is one meaning of "set to" that you will probably never hear because it is very regional and old fashioned. That is the meaning of engaging in an argument or physical fight.

"The couple had a "set to" over how to handle money problems."

"Two friends had a falling out and it resulted in a "set to" that destroyed their friendship.")

Maybe I wasn't clear.
To my vocabulary 'uppers' is the same thing as 'gaiters.'
I would call them "leggings", but I have heard them called "gaiters" on one or two occasions. That may be a difference between AmE and BrE, however.

Please, correct me if it's not like that.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: The Bible Riots
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 11:53:06 AM
Throughout history, anytime one culture experienced an influx of people from a different culture in a short period of time, tension and nativist movements arose.

One would think that with thousands of years of experience with this, it wouldn't be a surprise any longer, yet here we are, surprised once again that it is happening. Well, the ignorant are surprised anyway.

As the comedian, Ron White often says, "You can't fix stupid". But I have a veteran friend who has a T-shirt that says, "I'm a vet. I can fix stupid, but it's going to hurt". I need to get one of those shirts...Dancing


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Set to
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 11:43:29 AM
narkom12 wrote:
Let's imagine that someone is about to put on a garment wich does not belong to him.
The vocabulary says about to set,
"start working or dealing with something in an energetic and determined way."
So is it correct to say, "He

Set to pull on an uppers
But was told, "It is not yours."


Thanks.


The title of your post is "set to", but in the body of your post you mention "to set". These are two different things. Which one did you want to know about? It would also help to have more examples.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: German
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 11:41:53 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It's all colloquial.
#1 is actually missing a few words to make it "parse-able" - or replacing words with "synonym-phrases". However, it's common in speech (the extra words are not vital to the understanding of the sentence).

What level is my German?
Of what level is the quality of my German?

I definitely would not use #2 - and would feel someone who did use it was making a mistake.

"At" is VERY rarely used at the end of a sentence like that.
"Where is it?
"I'll show you where it is."
"Can you tell me where the library is?"
"What level is my German?"

"Where's it at?"
"I'll show you where it's at."
"Can you tell me where the library is at?
"What level is my German at?"

No doubt it is a regional thing. Here in the U.S., putting "at" on the end of a sentence is very common. That's why I said many will say it like that.

At one point, this was taught to be incorrect and wrong grammar, but today I think is has gained more acceptance.

#3 is correct, grammatically - it just sounds a bit over-formal.
Right. I was taught that this was the "proper" way to ask a question.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: The teacher intervention caused the student
Posted: Thursday, November 21, 2019 11:35:58 AM
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
The teacher's intervention...


Plus, the sentence is too long, rather rambling.


I agree. You are trying to do too many things in one sentence. There are many ways to say all this, but I think two or more sentences would be better than one.

For example:

"The teacher's intervention caused the student to immediately look down and remain silent. Trish, however, tried to continue arguing, but was immediately neutralized by her colleague and friend Amber, who gave her a stern look."

"The teacher's intervention caused the student to immediately look down and remain silent, but Trish tried to continue arguing. Amber gave her a stern look which immediately neutralized her friend."

"The teacher's intervention caused the student to immediately look down and remain silent. Trish tried to continue arguing, but Amber shot her a stern look which immediately shut her down."





We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: German
Posted: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 6:16:52 PM
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) What level is my German?

(2) What level is my German at?

(3) At what level is my German?

Which is correct?


People will commonly say (2), but (3) would be considered the best and most correct form.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit

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