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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Monday, May 20, 2019 9:46:42 PM
Number of Posts: 10,779
[1.15% of all post / 3.85 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: break it off with someone
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 9:46:02 PM
Fruity wrote:
https://youtu.be/obYDUyKxc7I

8. I've decided to break it off with her.

Is the phrasal verb "break off" always used with "it"?



Yes, if the idea is to break up with someone. But "break off" by itself means something different. It usually means "stop what I am/you are/they're doing".

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Shouldn't it be 'nor the' instead, as the antecedent is 'neither'?
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 9:42:06 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
A.
"Practically" has one meaning but two nuances:
Almost - "We have practically no sugar left."
[when applied] in reality/in practice : "Your idea of building a bridge is a good one, but practically, we have neither the equipment or money."

Shouldn't it be 'nor the' instead, as the antecedent is 'neither'?

Thanks.


I think you are right. It's usually "neither/nor"; neither the equipment nor the money.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Which is the correct verb?
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 6:06:06 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Science and technology is/are improving rapidly.

Which is the correct verb?

Thanks.



I would say "are".

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Is the sentence correct?
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 6:04:02 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Look at the first day’s page in your memorial book.

Is the sentence correct, especially with regard to the part in boldface?

Thanks.



It looks right to me.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: This would allow them to
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 6:03:04 PM
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I woudl please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

First of all, she is attracted to working at X Inc. because of the firm’s expertise in Z. Z is a key driver of insurance work at the present time, and this trend is expected to even (reads better without it) increase in the next few years. Developing models to calculate clients’ capital requirements (rather than using a model created by regulators) is a technically challenging, but very rewarding, task/activity (either works fine) as it would allow her to hone her analytical skills and put them to practical use.
Secondly, she values the opportunity to employ the software Y to model the financial risks faced by companies. Y is based on stochastic modelling. She finds it very appealing what such an approach can deliver in terms of modelling capabilities, as compared to a deterministic approach. Moreover, since she has taken a deterministic approach in her study of financial mathematics, she considers it [b]an enrichment of her professional development.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: will have stretched
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 5:39:01 PM
lazarius wrote:
https://books.google.com/books?id=PDF3oioLvO0C&q=%22will+have+stretched%22

Quote:
'You could do them permanent damage, Miss Trunchbull,' Miss Honey cried out.
'Oh, I have, I'm quite sure I have,' the Trunchbull answered, grinning. 'Eric's ears will have stretched quite considerably in the last couple of minutes. They'll be much longer now than they were before.

She's been holding the boy in the air by his ears for that couple of minutes. Now she says they will have stretched. Why will?

-


She is making a joke and exaggerating. His ears definitely will not have stretched.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: take a lesson
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 11:32:22 AM
It appears there is another difference between British and American English here. In the U.S., teachers "give" lessons, and the students "take" lessons. Students "take" art lessons. The also study lessons, complete lessons, and work on lessons. At least, that's the way it was when I was in school. I've no reason to think it's changed.

We also use an idiom "take a lesson" to mean "learn from this experience" whenever we want to emphasize the importance of an experience to someone.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: shopping mall
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 11:21:49 AM
Our National Mall in Washington, D.C.





We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Are all the questions natural and correct? (13)
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 10:53:00 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi teachers,
Amy and Lee both live in Beijing. This is part of an audio file.

Amy: Well, the tourist want to see the old things like the Forbidden City and the Temple of Heaven and they are right there, next to modern malls and big hotels.
Lee: I knew it wouldn't be long before you mentioned shopping. I can't stand those shopping malls, but I do like the markets.

Are all questions natural and correct?

1. Did Lee expect Amy to talk about shopping?
Yes, he did.
Now use direct speech to support your answer above.
Lee said, "I knew it wouldn't be long before you mentioned shopping."

*******************************************
2. What doesn't Lee like at all?
Shopping Malls.

*******************************************
3. What does Lee like very much?
The markets.

Thanks.


Yes, both of these work. I had a moment's pause with the second question, however. My preferred wording would be, "What does Lee not like at all?" Yours isn't wrong, this is just my personal preference.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: The story revolves...
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2019 10:49:33 AM
Amybal wrote:
Thank you FounDit. Your suggestion absolutely seems to be good :-)

By the way, just to reconfirm is this line correct?

Will they be together, ever?


It's not quite accurate. You've already stated that they have been together during periods of ups and downs. In that sense, they have already been together. The idea is to put them together on a more permanent basis. The more natural way to say that is: Will they ever be together permanently? or Will they ever be able to remain together?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit

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