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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:51:43 AM
Number of Posts: 9,119
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: we got it done and we have done it
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:51:39 AM
mcurrent wrote:
Hi.

I have the text:

The good news was we didn't have much food to carry. The bad news was that the sun was just coming up, and it was already hot. It took us a little longer to pack without Sam, but we got it done.

I wonder if the sense is changing if the text in bold will be "we have done it"? Can you explain to me the difference of these phrases?

Thanks.


Yes, the sense changes. With "we got it done", the sense is that the task was finished, or accomplished in the past, at the time being described.

With "we have done it", the sense is that the task has been completed, or finished recently. To move it further back in time, we say, "we have done it before", meaning some time before the most recent time "we have done it".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Grammar
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:37:27 AM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, do you see anything grammatically wrong in these sentence? Please let me know if the short is not connected to the long version.
They do seem connected, but I would make a few changes. A queen rules a queendom. A king rules a kingdom, but I would change that to a society to avoid repetition. By the way, is the River God female? If so, she should be a River Goddess.

Short summary
The Monkey King and his traveling companions must find a way to escape from the clutches of a queen who rules an all-female society. They soon land in even deeper trouble when their shenanigans anger the mighty River Goddess.

Long summary
While continuing their epic journey to the West, the Monkey King and his companions are taken captive by the Queen of an all-female society, who believes the strangers to be part of an ancient prophecy heralding the fall of her rule. With a lot of sorcery and a little bit of charm, the travelers devise a plan to escape. But when their trickery angers the mighty River Goddess, they realize they might just bring about the foretold destruction - unless they can find a way to quell her wrath.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Please check if my sentences are ok.
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:23:41 AM
Aoronly Kwilai wrote:

These look like homework sentences. Are they?


1. There had to be someone we know sneaked into my room and stole my money, and, highly likely, that someone might be Tom.


1. He told me that he will go to somewhere this Friday night. And, if you know him, that somewhere must be a pub.


3. She said when we last met she woud come visiting me sometime soon. And that sometime is likely to be this week.


Are these sentences correct? If there is anything wrong, please correct where it is wrong or make it sound more natural and understandable.

Thank you in advance.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Are hyphens needed?
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:22:27 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
SINGAPORE — It is a once in a lifetime opportunity that young footballers can only dream of, and Mr Harvey Davis is not about to let the chance to play for English Premier League club Fulham FC slip by for his 17-year-old son Ben.

Should the bold part be hyphenated?

Thanks.


No. I can't recall ever seeing it hyphenated. It is an idiomatic phrase.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Down through
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:49:26 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Thanks. Are they both prepositions or adverbs?


I'm no grammar expert, but I would call them adverbs, since they appear to modify "passed".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: visually baffling or blocking as a synonym for visually confusing
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:31:58 AM
robjen wrote:
When you see patterns full of colors and lines, they are visually baffling or blocking. Patterns full of colors and lines over a facial photograph could block computer recognition and visually baffle a human.

Can you use "visually baffling or blocking" as a synonym for "visually confusing"?

If not, how can you correct it? Thanks a lot.


I don't think "blocking" works for this because vision isn't actually blocked. You might use "visually baffling or confounding".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Stiff
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:22:09 AM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

What would be the closest synonym to "stiff" in the following sentence?

Some of the paintings are stiff and stylized, and others are quite rough.


"Stilted" makes a good synonym.

A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Grammar
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:20:42 AM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, do you see anything grammatically wrong in these sentence?
I suggest the following:

Short summary
Dattatraya Vakharia is a 102-year-old man who wants to break the record for the oldest living person in the world. To do that, he must find a way to change the sad and grumpy demeanor of his 75-year-old son.

Long summary
Dattatraya Vakharia is a 102-year-old, fun-loving man, who wants to break the record of being the oldest living man. However, there is only one hinderance - his 75 year old son, Babulal, who has resigned himself to a life of old age stuck in drudgery. Dattatraya now must find a way to change Babulal’s sad and grumpy demeanour so that he doesn’t become a deterrent in breaking the record.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: would or will that work for you/ could or can
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:09:43 AM
robjen wrote:
I am going to make up two pairs of examples below.
These first two don't set up the conditions properly, and I would never say these in this way.

I'd say, "Sorry, I am busy tomorrow, but I will be free next Thursday. Will/would that work for you?"

It's the statement about being free next Thursday that needs to be included. Beyond that, using will or would both sound fine to me as an AmE speaker, and I would expect to hear either one. I suspect, however, from past posts by BrE speakers, "would" might be preferred by them.

(1) Sorry, I am busy tomorrow. If you come to see me next Thursday, will that work for you?

(2) Sorry, I am busy tomorrow. If you come to see me next Thursday, would that work for you?


These sound like something an adult might say to a child. Though they appear grammatically correct to me, both of these could have an insulting tone to them, depending on how they are said. Therefore, we probably wouldn't say them to someone if we wanted to be polite. Better would be:

"Give it your best effort." Or,
"Try harder, please."



(3) You are not trying as hard as you can.

(4) You are not trying as hard as you could.



"would" is the past tense of "will".
"could" is the past tense of "can".

All of my non-native English speaking friends think all the sentences are correct. However, it's more polite to use the past tense "would" and "could".


Do you, native speakers, think my sentences are grammatically correct?

Do the sentences in each pair have the same meaning?

Thanks a lot.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Down through
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 10:53:36 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
The PEG tube is passed into your mouth, down through your stomach and out through the incision
https://www.ouh.nhs.uk/services/departments/neurosciences/neurology/mnd/support/peg-rig.aspx
Please explain the grammatical form and function of "down through" and "out through"


I assume you are having difficulty understanding what is meant by these terms. "Down through" would mean down the esophagus, into the stomach, and then "out through" the incision made through the midsection muscle layers where a PEG is to be installed.






A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~

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