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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, September 19, 2019 5:53:04 PM
Number of Posts: 11,698
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Missing words?
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 5:52:41 PM
kyle12 wrote:
what does even nexter mean? I don't know where this word has come from. I tried a lot to find the meaning but unable to satisfy my mind with free searches on google.


Who, or what, is "nexter", and where do you see that word?

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Missing words?
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 5:51:09 PM
thar wrote:
no, the transitive verb 'to surround'.That part of the sentence is sort of OK.
svo
A complex politics has surrounded this most controversial of projects.


the project is surrounded by complex politics


The rest is describing the rubble, although grammatically it should be describing the project to remove the rubble.

>Carefully excavated and moved across New York’s harbour to the city’s largest landfill site – Fresh Kills on Staten Island.

But I agree the writing in general is complete tosh. Whistle

I don't think that is a word used in AE, and it is old-fashioned in BE, but here it seems appropriate.


Ah, I see. It is "A complex (form of) politics has surrounded...

I read it as "A complex (that) politics has surrounded with..."


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: will vs would
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 5:45:55 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
However, Dr Mahathir has since said the promise of him eventually stepping down would be fulfilled, but has yet to set a date for it.

Should it be "will" instead?

Thanks.


I think either will work, because the word "eventually" places the event as happening in the future. He promised he eventually will be stepping down, and He promised he eventually would be stepping down.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Missing words?
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 1:48:39 PM
alibey1917 wrote:
"The huge project to clear the 1.6 million tonnes of smoking debris from the site of the collapse [of the World Trade Center] – our final example of the politics of manufactured ground – raises important but neglected questions about the links between vertical architecture and the waste ground it creates after it is removed. Carefully excavated and moved across New York’s harbour to the city’s largest landfill site – Fresh Kills on Staten Island – a complex politics has surrounded this most sensitive and controversial of projects."

Isn't there a missing word in the second sentence?

The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham


Yes, it most certainly does appear that way. It appears the word "with" should follow "surrounded", but even this hardly improves the overall wording.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Join the cast and filmmakers...
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 1:45:31 PM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, is there anything wrong in these sentences?
I suggest:

Short summary
Join the cast and filmmakers on and off the set for an intimate, hour-plus documentary, and check out the scenes that didn’t make the final cut.

Long summary
Join the cast and filmmakers on and off the set for an intimate, hour-plus documentary of the making of, Rise Of The Phoenix. Then get an inside look at the film’s explosive "5th Avenue Sequence", and buckle up for "How To Fly Your Jet To Space With Beast", which puts you in the cockpit with Beast as you’ve never seen him before. Check out the scenes that didn’t make the final cut, and experience the movie and deleted scenes in a whole new way with audio commentary from Simon Kinberg and Hutch Parker!

I placed quotation marks around what appear to be the titles of action sequences in the documentary. Using underlines could work as well, and may be useful in conjunction, or as stand-alone punctuation. Your choice, I suppose.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: effort/effect, a typo?
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 11:45:10 AM
zhonglc2020 wrote:
Hello everyone,

I know you don't like that guy, but you could make a(n) _____ to be polite.
A. try
B. effort
C. hard
D. effect
Key D
http://www.manfen5.com/stinfo/GZ_YY/SYS201209020405167715317877/

I feel the key is wrong. It's B or there is no key for the question.
I think the topic sentence wants to say something like "pretend to be polite".
Maybe, B can make sense, meaning "make your best to be polite", but I don't know.

What's the matter with the question?


Thank you in advance.


Only B works. All the others cannot work in this sentence. D is incorrect.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: As to people saying a few idle words about us, we must not mind that, any more than the old church-steeple minds the rooks...
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 11:41:44 AM
Daemon wrote:
As to people saying a few idle words about us, we must not mind that, any more than the old church-steeple minds the rooks cawing about it.

George Eliot (1819-1880)


The opinions of a few are of little matter, and the value they have, if any, is tiny, or of none at all.

However, when the few incite a mob mentality, that should not be tolerated.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: schooling & education
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 11:36:55 AM
zhonglc2020 wrote:
Thank you, FounDit.

Studying means something like research, while the word studies means subjects, don't they?


Studying implies the active effort of attempting to learn, or acquire information from some source(s). This may involve research in one area, if, for example, you say you are studying a particular disease, looking for a cure.

But in your example, Einstein's family didn't have the money to pay for him to continue something. That "something" was not his effort to learn, but the actual subjects he might study - his "studies".

So, yes, you are right. Studying involves the effort, while "studies" are the subjects in this example.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: We must uphold/put the object of worship at the centre of our life.
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 11:27:22 AM
Romany wrote:

I,m not quite sure why FD suggested that "uphold" would be better, but then said it wasn't appropriate.
I didn't intend to suggest "uphold" wasn't appropriate. I was questioning upholding an "object".

"Put" is a perfectly fine word, but in the case of worship, I thought "uphold" created an image of lifting up, which to me, adds to the idea of adoring, or being enamored of something.

I do not know what is being worshiped. From past postings, I thought perhaps it was something in Buddhism, but I was under the impression that Buddhists did not worship a divine being, but rather a philosophy, or way of being, so there is no "object" to uphold.

I am, however, open to being instructed on the matter if, in my ignorance of the religion, I have that wrong.

The simple "put" would be my choice, remember:- the simpler and clearer the better.

Many people claim that the deity they worship is at the centre of all they do in their lives; there's nothing arguable about that.

While I agree that "to uphold" gives another kind of meaning - which IS questionable - to the sentence.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Stranded in a mansion...
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 11:18:59 AM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, is there anything wrong in these sentences?
The young woman has more than a speech disability, she cannot hear either. But in the short summary, this is not so important, so I would save it for the long summary.

Also, you say there has been a series of gruesome killings, but this isn't mentioned in the long summary. So it might be beneficial to include that, or omit it in the short summary.

Short summary
Stranded in a mansion where a series of gruesome killings happened, a young woman struggles to find a way to escape from the murderer.

Long summary
Shruti is a deaf and mute girl who grew up in an orphanage in Chennai. However, impressed with Shruti’s character and natural talent, a millionaire from the UK adopts her, and makes her his legal heir. When Shruti reaches London, trouble arises in the form of a home invasion. A mysterious person tries to kill Shruti in the mansion. Who is that person, and why he is trying to kill Shruti?
(In this case, "Who is" is better than "Who's" because it puts more emphasis on the person, and doesn't sound so much like "Whose")


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit

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