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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Friday, May 26, 2017 8:28:03 PM
Number of Posts: 7,914
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: pursuing/with the goal of
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 8:27:54 PM
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
In particular, she would like to pursue her career as an Inspection Engineer because it would allow/enable her to be responsible for ensuring that equipment performs effectively and efficiently pursuing/with the goal of maximizing return on assets while ensuring a safe and efficient workplace. She believes that X Inc. is the ideal place for her to achieve her professional goals because of the complexity and the scope/scale of the projects the company is involved in and its strong emphasis on safety, something/aspects that she came to appreciate when talking with one of the company’s representatives at her university career fair. She is also fascinated by the prospect of working in one of the largest refinery in Europe, which is/benefits also from being one of the most technologically advanced (the X refinery is equipped with a modern co-generation unit).


I'm sorry to tell you this, but I find this paragraph's sentences overly long, and excessively worded, with confusing ideas. People will usually stop reading if they see very long sentences. Since you began with "In particular", I assume there has been some mention of her desire to be an Inspection Engineer in earlier sentences.

I suggest making them shorter and reword them a bit. Such as:

In particular, a career as an Inspection Engineer would provide the opportunity to oversee the effective and efficient operation of equipment. She believes that X Inc. is the ideal place for her to achieve her professional goals because of the complexity and the scope/scale (either one works) of the projects the company is involved in. She is also eager to work in one of the largest refineries in Europe, which is also one of the most technologically advanced (the X refinery is equipped with a modern co-generation unit).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your helpful advice. With regard to the use of In particular, this is the sentence that precedes the text above:
She believes that working in the oil and gas industry would afford her the opportunity to combine her background in engineering with her interest in the energy sector.
Do you think that it would then be appropriate to use In particular, (since, within the oil and gas sector, she would like to focus on a career as an Inspection Engineer), by saying: In particular, a career as an Inspection Engineer would provide ...
Yes, I think you could use it if you like. It points out the particular career she is interested in pursuing.

Regarding the first clause, is it possible to complete your suggested sentence, as follows:
In particular, a career as an Inspection Engineer would provide (her with? Okay) the opportunity to oversee the effective and efficient operation of equipment, in order to maximize return on assets while ensuring a safe workplace.
I could be wrong, but it doesn't seem to me that maximizing return on assets is under the purview of an Inspection Engineer, but rather the CFO. But if it is, then leave it in.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: SUCH THAT
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 8:18:03 PM
D00M wrote:
FounDit wrote:
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Speech communities can demonstrate resilience when a sense of pride is restored to them such that elders are heard and youth can continue to speak.

Is 'such that' a conjunction? What does it mean?


It appears to function that way to me. "Such that" carries the idea of "in such a situation as this".


Thank you.

Can we say the following?

Speech communities can demonstrate resilience when a sense of pride is restored to them in such a situation as elders are heard and youth can continue to speak.


Using the prepositional phrase works if you make it two sentences. Also, you left out a word "this".

Speech communities can demonstrate resilience when a sense of pride is restored to them. In such a situation as this, elders are heard and youth can continue to speak.

You could also say, "Speech communities can demonstrate resilience when a sense of pride is restored to them. In such a situation, elders are heard and youth can continue to speak.

Using "such that" shortens this to one sentence, but retains the same meaning.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: pursuing/with the goal of
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 4:13:44 PM
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
In particular, she would like to pursue her career as an Inspection Engineer because it would allow/enable her to be responsible for ensuring that equipment performs effectively and efficiently pursuing/with the goal of maximizing return on assets while ensuring a safe and efficient workplace. She believes that X Inc. is the ideal place for her to achieve her professional goals because of the complexity and the scope/scale of the projects the company is involved in and its strong emphasis on safety, something/aspects that she came to appreciate when talking with one of the company’s representatives at her university career fair. She is also fascinated by the prospect of working in one of the largest refinery in Europe, which is/benefits also from being one of the most technologically advanced (the X refinery is equipped with a modern co-generation unit).


I'm sorry to tell you this, but I find this paragraph's sentences overly long, and excessively worded, with confusing ideas. People will usually stop reading if they see very long sentences. Since you began with "In particular", I assume there has been some mention of her desire to be an Inspection Engineer in earlier sentences.

I suggest making them shorter and reword them a bit. Such as:

In particular, a career as an Inspection Engineer would provide the opportunity to oversee the effective and efficient operation of equipment. She believes that X Inc. is the ideal place for her to achieve her professional goals because of the complexity and the scope/scale (either one works) of the projects the company is involved in. She is also eager to work in one of the largest refineries in Europe, which is also one of the most technologically advanced (the X refinery is equipped with a modern co-generation unit).


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Kevin was wearing and old shirt
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:43:07 PM
He took a velvet pouch from his pocket. Then he took out three coins. You should say he took the coins from the pouch. It sounds as if he took out the pouch and the coins at different times or from different places.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: SUCH THAT
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:38:33 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Speech communities can demonstrate resilience when a sense of pride is restored to them such that elders are heard and youth can continue to speak.

Is 'such that' a conjunction? What does it mean?


It appears to function that way to me. "Such that" carries the idea of "in such a situation as this".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: speech communities
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:35:54 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Are 'speech communities' and 'linguistic communities' synonymous?

If not, what's the difference?


Without more context, it is difficult to answer. However, if by "speech" the language of the community is meant, then they might be synonymous.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: The learner doesn't know
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:33:20 PM
Either an "a" or "the" could be used since the sense of the sentence indicates each single learner.

A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: it fell out to my mind another way
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:31:30 PM
vkhu wrote:
Quote:
I wished heartily now for the Spaniard, and the savage that had gone with him, or that I had any way to have come undiscovered within shot of them, that I might have secured the three men, for I saw no firearms they had among them; but it fell out to my mind another way.

-Robinson Crusoe


Original text: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/521/521-h/521-h.htm

Does the part in bold means he stopped thinking about it, or that he found an alternative?


It seems to me he found an alternate way to capture them.

A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: All the children - Both the children
Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 10:48:54 AM
You know who I am wrote:
FounDit wrote:
You know who I am wrote:
Hey guys.

I have a question regarding: Quantifiers.

One rule is: When another deteminer such as Articles, Demonstratives, Possessives... comes after a quantifier, "of" must be added:

A few
friends were there
A few of "my" friends were there

Why does this rule not apply to All and Both?

Both children were at the party.
Both the children were at the party.

All children were at the party.
All the children were at the party.


An interesting question. As I pondered it, I found myself realizing that "both" and "all" include the total, whereas a "few" did not. It was this that made it clear for me.

Whenever you are speaking about the total number, the word "of" is not necessary. You would have "all my friends", or "all my children". But when you are speaking of a small amount, or number, out of a larger amount, or number, then we use "of".

So you can have a "few of" your friends, or a "few of your children", but if you only have two friends, or two children, then "all" and "both" don't require "of" because those two are the total amount.


Yes, FounDit, I completely got your point; that quite makes sense. However, don't you think this rule should also apply to quantifiers such as: Neither, which refers to two people only?

Thank you!


As Audiendus said, you will sometimes hear both. However, using my logic as stated above, the word "of" would not be necessary when you are speaking of a total. This is because "neither" is a total — not one and not the other, and there are no more. So, since this is a total number, "of" may be omitted.

If, however, you are speaking of one or another out of two, then "of" could be used. "Neither one of my friends came". Since this is one out of two (neither indicates two), then "of" fits. I don't know if this is a rule or not, just my thinking on the subject.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: I want to understand something
Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 10:40:03 AM
Nikitus wrote:
Hello.

First of all, thanks for all your help and time.

I want to ask about the following:




-I want to understand something. You did a "deal" with Keith that was related with you performing “the ghost” and now Mark must delete the video?

-No exactly. My credibility was jeopardized before my students. In a leadership course for teachers, the video was shown and everyone watched it. I told my students and colleagues that it was just an inside joke between me and Kevin.



Is it correct to write "You did a "deal" with Keith that was related with you performing “the ghost” and now Mark must delete the video?"
Not quite. Though this is informal speech, the "deal" was related to, not with, the performance. A better wording might be, "You made a "deal" with Keith that was related to your performance as "the ghost", and now Mark must delete the video?"

Is it correct to write "My credibility was jeopardized before my students."
Using "before" creates the impression the students merely observed his credibility being jeopardized. I think a better wording would be, "My credibility with my students was put in jeopardy."

Is it correct to write "In a leadership course for teachers, the video was shown and everyone watched it."
Okay

Is it correct to write "I told my students and colleagues that it was just an inside joke between me and Kevin."

Okay



Thanks.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~

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