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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Sunday, January 20, 2019 1:04:22 PM
Number of Posts: 10,108
[1.10% of all post / 3.77 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: off/out
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 1:04:03 PM
Atatürk wrote:
I wonder if hedy speaks American English.

Yes, she does. Though we live in different parts of the U.S., she in the New York area and I in Texas, we both said the same thing.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: pls. explain words
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:57:59 PM
QP wrote:
Hi friends,

Could you explain the words in bold:-

There was a Chitlin Circuit that black artists played back in those days, especially goin' through the South. We called it the Chitlin Circuit 'cause
a lot of those places were like funky like that, you know, like funky like chitlins.

Thank you
QP


Funk, or funky, originally meant "smelly" or "stinky", and cooking chitlins produces a strong smell I would call stinky, but eventually, funk and funky came to mean something thought of as cool and popular.

In the Southern part of the U.S., chitlins were part of the foods eaten by mountain folk and black folks in particular, though many people liked them.

Because they are the food of poor folks, they are thought of as being "down to Earth", simple, plain, and ordinary. This is often the sense of "funky" - relating to a particular group or taste.

So black artists playing across the South called it the Chitlin' Circuit because they found chitlins to be a part of that culture. This is similar to the old-fashioned words of "cool, hip, mod, etc." Today it might be compared to "woke". So funky like chitlins would mean popular like chitlins.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: air-mobile?
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:43:07 PM
A reference to the Cadillac coup de ville of the late 1950' and 60's. The suspension was said to be so good that riding in one was like riding on air.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Half
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:39:11 PM
Atatürk wrote:
Please come half an hour earlier to class.
Please come to class half an hour earlier.

Both fine?


Yes, though the second one would probably be said more often.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: few and far between #3
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:37:27 PM
Atatürk wrote:
Actually, the weekends that I can fully spend with my family are few and far between.

Fine?


Yes.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: won't
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:35:49 PM
Atatürk wrote:
The train won't be leaving the station for an hour.

Why would 'won't have been' be wrong in the above.

What is causing me trouble is the time expression "for an hour", which is normally used with perfect tenses.

Won't is will not, of course, so the train will not be leaving until an hour has passed. That is the sense of "won't".

"won't have been" wouldn't make sense to us because "won't" is future, but "have been" is past. The only way to make this work is to say something like, "The train will not have left before an hour passes", but this is an overly complicated and confusing way to say it when "won't be leaving" is much simpler and more clear.






We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Are the questions correct?
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:30:44 PM
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi teachers,
Peter is annoyed.

The natural question is "How is Peter?"; right?
Could these questions be also correct to explain the meaning of the one above to the students?
a) What is his emotional state/condition (like)?
b) What are his emotions (like)?
To say the ones above with "How" instead of "What" is not correct, is it?

Thanks.


There are several ways to ask this using both what and how:

What is Peter feeling?
How would you describe Peter's emotional state?
What is his emotional state?
What emotion do you think he is feeling?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: verb
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:27:38 PM
Atatürk wrote:
Recently you've become so weak; you should have some high-protein food to sustain yourself.

I suspect it 'sustain' is not the right verb here. What would be the right one then?


You could think of it as merely keeping the person alive in a weak condition, so in that sense a better word can be used such as "improve your condition", or "to improve your health".


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: comma #2
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 11:22:01 AM
Atatürk wrote:
After that, I went to a cash machine to take some money, but it was out of order, too.


Would you keep the comma in the above?

Yes, but I would use "get some money" in the sense of "obtain", rather than "take" some money. Using "take" carries the sense of stealing the money.




We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Looking for a verb that means "be outside/beyond"
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 11:19:13 AM
Tella wrote:
For inside we have words like inhere, fill, occupy.

Do you know any words that mean "be/exist outside of or beyond"? The closest I can think of is exceed as in "This island exceeds any map known to man." or "The object exceeded the observable radius." Another option is surround but that would imply that it's all over.

Thank you!


Expand/ extend/ beyond/ outside/ extra territorial/ out of bounds/ outside the boundaries of?

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit

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