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Profile: Drag0nspeaker
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User Name: Drag0nspeaker
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Security Guard
Interests: Life, languages, Scientology
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 12, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 12:16:11 PM
Number of Posts: 31,663
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Restrictive clause
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 12:04:18 PM
I have time to spare sometimes . . .
Sometimes an answer like "No, it isn't" would be perfectly correct, but it wouldn't help much!d'oh!

Then my answers sort of grow and grow as I'm typing.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Restrictive clause
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 11:54:32 AM
Hi Atatürk.

Your sentences are correct.
The first is a non-restrictive clause, so COULD be omitted. The listener already knows which town you mean.

The town is famous for its potato festival (and it lies thirty miles from the capital).

The second one is a restrictive clause.
The relative clause defines which town you mean - the listener does not already know.
It can be written with "that" or "which".
The town that lies thirty miles from the capital is famous for its potato festival.
The town which lies thirty miles from the capital is famous for its potato festival.

Some Americans like to quote the American Psychiatric Association (which issued a style-guide suggesting that only "that" should be used) as if they are experts on grammar and have written a RULE. It's not true.

But this use of 'which' with restrictive clauses is very common, even in edited prose. Moreover, in some situations 'which' is preferable to 'that'. 'Which' can be especially useful where two or more relative clauses are joined by 'and' or 'or': It is a philosophy in which ordinary people may find solace and which many have found reason to praise. 'Which' may also be preferable when introducing a restrictive clause modifying a preceding phrase that contains 'that': We want to assign only that material which will be most helpful. American Heritage Dictionary

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Participial clause
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 11:36:13 AM
Participial phrases are ANY phrases beginning with a participle.
That is their form (shape) - they begin with a participle. They usually act in a sentence as adverbials or adjectivals.
Often they are separated from their assumed subject by other words - these are generally adverbials.
He shouted at her, making her cry for hours. (He made her cry - the result of shouting)
He ate all of the cake, being super hungry. (He was hungry - the reason he ate the cake)
These are not clauses, because they don't contain a finite verb or subject - the participle REPLACES the finite verb.
"He making her cry for hours" does not make sense.


clause
n
1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence.
Collins English Dictionary
1. a syntactic construction containing a subject and predicate and forming part of a sentence or constituting a whole simple sentence. Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary

Sometimes, something which looks like a simple participial phrase can be seen to be adjectival and will follow directly after the assumed subject. Very often these are 'reduced relative clauses' - clauses with the subject and finite verb omitted.

I saw the waves (which were) surfing onto the surfer.
This is a reduced relative clause (it has the subject 'which' and finite verb 'were', which are omitted for the sake of brevity - being brief or short).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Insist
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 11:06:28 AM
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
Just a reminder, that everyone think's they are right.

Ah, no - Some of us just KNOW we're always right! Whistle Whistle Anxious

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Just Cat Things
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:58:16 AM
The original "Sylvester the Cat"
Felis silvestris silvestris - The Scottish Wildcat.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: If animals could think.......
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:46:16 AM

Don't forget what happened to the Bull Mastiff - you're next if you don't cooperate.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Book Titles
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:38:06 AM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Have you read "Impossible Englineering: Technology and Territoriality on the Canal du Midi? Very interesting ^^^^^^^^^^^^

Sandman - Book of Dreams - Neil Gaiman



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Phobia List
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:22:38 AM

Go-go-go!phobia - fear of enthusiastic sports coaches


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: song title association
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:20:23 AM
The Way - Fastball


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Topic: ⬆ Count up ⬆
Posted: Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:17:41 AM


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!

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