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User Name: Audiendus
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Joined: Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Last Visit: Sunday, January 21, 2018 11:24:16 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: tense
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 10:53:27 PM
Fyfardens wrote:
If you consider the so-called 'present' tense as being the 'unmarked' tense, and the so-called 'past tense' as the 'marked' tense (marked for distancing in time, vividness, reality or directness), then may of the problems of mismatching disappear.

The 'marked'/'unmarked' distinction is problematic for some irregular verbs. For example:

Would you mind if she puts her bag here?
Would you mind if she put her bag here?


We would have to call "puts" the unmarked tense and "put" the marked tense - which in this instance seems the wrong way round!
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 8:33:01 PM
Leibniz
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 8:28:27 PM
equivoques
Topic: Rather than
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 8:03:02 PM
D00M wrote:
I guess the parts in the given sentence are grammatically independent of the modifier:'for enrolling for graduate-level'.

The main reason is X rather than Y. I reckon X and Y are the parts.

Am I correct please?

Yes.

The main reason for enrolling for graduate level is:
X: their interest in the subject, rather than
Y: meeting new people.


Although "to meet" is grammatically possible here (both "their interest in the subject" and "to meet new people" are noun phrases), the sentence flows much better with the gerund "meeting", as above. It would be perfectly OK to say:

The main reason for enrolling for graduate level is to meet new people.

but if we insert the extra words in the middle, the "to" of the infinitive (we cannot use a bare infinitive here) seems to interrupt the flow:

The main reason for enrolling for graduate level is their interest in the subject rather than to meet new people.

"X rather than Y" and "to X rather than (to) Y" are suitably parallel, but "X rather than to Y" is not.
Topic: The kinds of the doer - Hidden subjects
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 9:22:16 AM
A cooperator wrote:
That Scottish person said ' "Please don't be offended by this next question".
I, myself, understood it as "Please, you don't be offended by this next question"

You can understand it that way if you wish; it is true that it relates to "you". However, it would be wrong to actually include the word "you" before "don't" (in speech or writing).
Topic: tense
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 9:00:20 AM
Here are some examples of mismatches between form/tense and time. In the brackets, I indicate the form/tense first, then the time referred to.

It is time I went. [past, present]
It is time I was going. [past continuous, present]
Imagine that an earthquake occurred tomorrow. [past, future]
If you were to show it to him, he wouldn't know what it was. [past, present/future]
I leave next Wednesday. [present, future]
I am leaving next Wednesday. [present continuous, future]
Then, yesterday she suddenly appears again. [present, past]
...and I'm thinking: "Why?" [present continuous, past]
...and the next moment, she has gone. [present perfect, past]
Ah, that will be my friend at the door. [future, present]
I am sure you will be wondering what this all means. [future continuous, present]
I requested that the paragraph be removed. [present subjunctive, past]

Also:
I wish you had come tomorrow instead. [past perfect, future] (This was discussed recently in one of the threads. It is informal and not strictly logical, as it mixes future time and past time, but its meaning is clear.)
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 10:54:49 PM
Metzger
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 9:11:54 PM
Albuquerque
Topic: 'how to know.....' is incorrect.
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 8:07:30 PM
A cooperator wrote:
So, how to know if 'there' is used as an adverb of a place or introductory/preparatory subject?

This is grammatically similar to: "So, how to drive a car?", which would likewise be incorrect.

"How to..." is a noun phrase, but in the above examples it is not the subject of any verb, or the object of any verb or preposition. So the above examples are not complete sentences (although such incomplete sentences are sometimes heard in informal English). Compare the following, which are correct:

"How to drive a car is one of the things you will learn." ["how to drive a car" is the subject of "is"]
"She knows how to drive a car." ["how to drive a car" is the object of "knows"]
"He asked about how to drive a car." ["how to drive a car" is the object of the preposition "about"].
Topic: Say It Differently Game
Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 9:39:03 PM
There are no problems on the occidental line.


There was a heated argument about the use of a comma.

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