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Profile: Audiendus
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User Name: Audiendus
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Joined: Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Last Visit: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 12:04:44 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: To confront a bunch of countries, among which are the US and UK(Subject–verb inversion)
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 11:21:45 PM
A cooperator wrote:
To be consistent, even "to whom" should be "who.... to" or "whom.... to" in informal written English and in informal spoken English.

Informal written or spoken English:
'It is me whom you are talking to.'
'It is me who you are talking to.'

Formal written or spoken English:
'It is I to whom you are talking.'


Yes. "Whom" is now uncommon in speech. Also, spoken English often omits the relative pronoun:
"It's me you're talking to."
Topic: Object complement
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 10:48:04 PM
I consider them adjectival. They describe "the guard" and "Jack" respectively, not how "I found" them. They are object complements - they modify the object, which is a noun.
Topic: would seem
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 8:05:12 PM
To express uncertainty
We are lost. [definite]
We seem to be lost. [uncertain]
We would seem to be lost. [even more uncertain]
(The 'uncertainty' may not be genuine: the speaker may think we are definitely lost, but be unwilling to admit it.)

To express a hypothetical
The reason would seem small and foolish to us. [= if it were explained to us]
It is not worth telling him, because he wouldn't understand. [= if he were told]
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 8:15:04 AM
interruption
Topic: I see you awake early today.(both 'awake' and 'early' are adverbs)
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 10:10:38 PM
A cooperator wrote:
Yes, I am quite familiar with that 'awake' in "I saw you awake early, today." is an adjective describing 'you' and 'early' is an adverb describing 'my seeing for you'.

Yes, that is how it is dealt with in English. Please read the linked TFD article on object complements. It makes no mention of adverbs.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Object-Complements.htm

A cooperator wrote:
But, I am looking for the derived adverb of 'awake' or the equivalent word in English used as an adverb answering the question "By what method did you see me today?" Can I say "I saw you awakenedly/awokenly/wokenly early, today." since I couldn't find an adverb.

I do not know of any dictionary that lists such adverbs. From my point of view as a native English speaker, I do not think an adverb would be appropriate here. A person can 'see' in various ways: early, late, often, seldom, suddenly, gradually, well, badly, easily, clearly, dimly, indistinctly, fuzzily, fortunately, surprisingly, sadly, relievedly - but one cannot (in normal English) see awakenedly or awokenly. (If I came across the sentence "I saw you awakenedly/awokenly early today", I would assume it meant that 'I', not 'you', was in an awakened/awoken state.)

A cooperator wrote:
However, in "The runner came back actively.", it's 'In what manner did the runner come back?' whose answer is an adverb 'actively'.

Yes, but the adverb gives a different meaning from the adjective here. Consider the following:

1. The runner came back tiredly. [= he was tired while he was coming back; he came back slowly and wearily]
2. The runner came back tired. [= he was tired when he had come back; he may not have been tired while he was coming back; he may have come back quickly and energetically]

A cooperator wrote:
Is it because 'see' in English can be used with an adjective and adverbs. Or that adverbs and adjectives in English are dealt differently than they are dealt in Arabic.

It may be a difference between the two languages, yes.
Topic: Limericks
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 9:51:21 PM
jacobusmaximus wrote:
Less so for the Dutch
Who helped very much
To show James and his lot the Way Out.


The Protestants dubbed the coup 'glorious',
But dissident scribes were censorious.
We would, with good reason,
Call such a plot 'treason'
Had William not turned out victorious.
Topic: I see you awake early today.(both 'awake' and 'early' are adverbs)
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 9:36:43 PM
A cooperator wrote:
I saw you wake up, early this morning. (here 'wake up' is a verb, I need it an adverb)
I saw you awaken, early this morning.('awaken' is an adjective) No, 'awaken' is a verb. ('Awoken' is an adjective, i.e. the past participle of the verb 'to awake' when used transitively.).
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning ('eat' is a verb)

I want to know 'how did you see me?' So, I think the answer will be 'I saw you awake early, today.' where 'awake' and 'early' must be both 'adverbs.' which convey the answer of the question 'how did you see me'.
'How did you see me?' here means "In what state was I when you saw me?" (to be answered with an adjective), not "In what manner did you see me?" or "By what method did you see me?" (both of which would be answered with an adverb). 'Awake' in "I saw you awake" describes 'you', not 'my seeing'.
Topic: To confront a bunch of countries, among which are the US and UK(Subject–verb inversion)
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 8:57:29 PM
A cooperator wrote:
When must 'it is them whom we act with'?
'It is me whom you are talking to.'

In traditional grammar, "it is them...", "it is me..." etc are always incorrect, because a subject complement requires the subjective (sometimes called 'nominative') case. In informal written English and in spoken English, however, the objective (sometimes called 'accusative') case is often used in such instances. In spoken English, if the sentence ends with the personal pronoun, the objective case is almost always used (and "it is" is shortened to "it's"):

It's me.
It's him.
It's her.
It's us.
It's them.

"It is I", "it is he" etc would sound very old-fashioned if spoken.

Topic: To confront a bunch of countries, among which are the US and UK(Subject–verb inversion)
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 8:33:01 PM
A cooperator wrote:
As a result, if a phrase followed "to be" verb is NOT a state permanently accompanying a subject, and can be changed from time to time, then "to be" won't be a linking verb.

What if "to be" is followed by an adjective that is not a permanent state, e.g. "He is glad" or "The weather is fine"?
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 10:19:44 AM
frogspawn

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