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Profile: Audiendus
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User Name: Audiendus
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Interests: Language, philosophy, music
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Joined: Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 9:43:13 AM
Number of Posts: 5,085
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Incomplete sentences
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 11:07:22 PM
OK, my examples of incomplete sentences are:

I put the book.
He deemed their behaviour.
We regard the idea.

Verbs such as 'put', 'deem' and 'regard' require a further word or phrase as a complement, e.g.

I put the book on the table.
He deemed their behaviour unacceptable.
We regard the idea as worth trying.

With regard to the "lend" example mentioned earlier, note the difference between "The library lends books" (complete) and "The library puts books" (incomplete).
Topic: Anyone having won the medals has a prize.
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 10:35:14 PM
It is not absolutely wrong to use the perfective "having..." as a noun modifier (see the examples in blue below), but it is rather awkward.

Anyone who sees this man should call the police.
Anyone seeing this man should call the police.
Anyone who has seen this man should call the police.
Anyone having seen this man should call the police.

The person who scores the most points is the winner.
The person scoring the most points is the winner.
The person who has scored the most points is the winner.
The person having scored the most points is the winner.
Topic: temple, XYZ
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 8:28:40 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
at home, in society and in the temple, XYZ.

This doesn't seem right, either with or without a comma after "temple".

If "XYZ" stands for a name, then it is referring to a specific temple. However, "women", "at home" and "in society" are general terms, and in that context "the temple" would have a general meaning, i.e. any temple. (Compare the expression "in the workplace".) So I don't think the quoted phrase works.
Topic: Which part is correctly punctuated?
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 8:15:59 PM
thar wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
1. In the universe, all life begins with a single breath and, with that, comes the next.

take out the part between the commas, and what do you get?

In the universe, all life begins with a single breath and comes the next.

That is clearly wrong.

I see "comes the next" as an inversion:

In the universe, all life begins with a single breath and [with that] the next comes.

thar wrote:
In the universe all life begins with a single breath, and with that [breath] comes the next [breath]

But I think grammarians don't like that? Comma and conjunction?

That would be my preference. I think grammarians are happy with it - indeed, I think most of them would recommend it. It is journalists who, for some reason, don't like it. In newspaper articles (at least in the UK) the comma is almost always omitted before an "and" joining two independent clauses.
Topic: old Paris/the old Paris
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 7:53:58 PM
Helenej wrote:
The screen shows a bird's eye view of the old Paris. (Paris as it used to be a hundred years ago.)

Is the definite article used correctly or should there be none?


It is correct to include the definite article if the particular "old Paris" is specified. Examples:

1. Paris has changed a lot since 1918. The screen shows a bird's eye view of the old Paris. [i.e. Paris in 1918]

2. He was dreaming of Paris - not the modern city, but the old Paris of horse-drawn carriages and gas-lit boulevards.

In these examples I would not capitalize "old".
Topic: Incomplete sentences
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 9:17:02 AM
pjharvey wrote:
I am not sure what you mean with "incomplete sentences".
Maybe something like the present one?

No, there is no verb there.
Topic: Incomplete sentences
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 9:15:29 AM
BobShilling wrote:
I lent a book.

?

No, I would call that complete. (One may wonder who I lent the book to, but the context may make that clear.)
Topic: Before the look of disbelief of the tourists
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 9:09:14 AM
I suggest:

Quote:
After he [had] explained in detail the reasons why it was not a good product, the potential buyers cancel[l]ed the purchase and quickly left [the place].
Topic: miscellaneous questions
Posted: Friday, August 24, 2018 9:02:44 AM
Also, I would put a colon rather than a comma after "chapter".
Topic: Incomplete sentences
Posted: Thursday, August 23, 2018 9:31:28 PM
Consider the following sentences:

I like the house.
We eat fish.
The students learn English.
Everyone heard it.
It causes problems.

All these sentences consist of a subject (in red), a finite transitive verb (in blue), and a direct object (in green); and they are all grammatically complete.

However, it is possible to have sentences of this form that are not complete. Can anyone think of any? I have some examples in mind, but I'll see what any of you can come up with first.

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