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Profile: Audiendus
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User Name: Audiendus
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Last Visit: Sunday, October 13, 2019 11:52:34 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: 'Go (to) be seen with someone' ('to-infinitive' used as An adverbial phrase of purpose)
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 10:19:26 PM
A cooperator wrote:
"collective numeral" redirects here. It is not to be confused [by someone] with collective number or collective noun."

I am wondering why the author chose to rephrase this sentence with a dummy subject + 'to be' + infinitive/passive infinitive' instead of using 'a dummy subject + 'to be' + past participle "It is not confused with....". Because that would give the wrong meaning. "It is not to be confused with..." means "It should not be confused with...".

Also, what is the active form of the passive to-infinitive form?
I think passive to-infinitive form would be made into the active form as follows:
"collective numeral" redirects here. It is not to be confused [by someone] with collective number or collective noun."
It is not to have someone confuse it(collective numeral) with collective number or collective noun.
No. I understand how you derived that sentence, but it would not make sense to a native English speaker. Why do you wish to use the active form? The idea is that the expression "collective numeral" should not be confused. Who should not confuse it is unimportant. The sentence did not say "confused by...". It is complete as it stands; it does not need to refer to an agent. I am sure you understand what it means, so why complicate it? Language is not a mathematical exercise where you need to change the subject of an equation, like "a = 2b, therefore b = a/2".
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 9:21:49 PM
newspaper
Topic: 'Through' and 'from' can be used as prepositions introducing the agent in passive forms.
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 10:30:58 PM
A cooperator wrote:
But, there appears to be very nuance, if no difference at all, between whether the "past participles" above are used as part of passive verbs or adjectival participles - they look so alike.

The presence of "by" introducing an gent was helping me to know if a past participle is used as part of a passive verb. And, other prepositions other than "by" can facilitate adjectival participles distinguishing. But, I am now confused "past participles used as parts of passive verb" with "adjectives".

So, I can still think of past participles as if they are part of passive verbs, especially if only "by" is written or no prepositions at all. So, the active forms of passive form would be made into:

I am appalled by his constant rudeness. => His constant rudeness appals me. ['appalls' in the US spelling]
We were appalled by the poverty and starvation we saw everywhere. => The poverty and starvation we saw everywhere appalled us.

I am exhausted by all the work I have done. => all the work I have done exhausts me.
The long journey to work every morning exhausted him => He was exhausted by the long journey to work every morning.


I am still confused by this sentence. => This sentence confuses me.
I am a bit confused. Could you explain that again? => Something confuses me.
The situation is confused by the fact that so many organisations are involved. => the fact that so many organisations are involved confuses the situation.

As I have said in other threads in the past, the basic rule is that the "-ed" word is part of a passive verb if it refers to an action, and an adjectival participle if it refers to a state. So:

The door was closed immediately. [refers to an action]
When I arrived, the door had been closed. [past perfect tense refers to an earlier action]
When I arrived, the door was already closed. [simple past tense refers to an ongoing state]


But there is often no clear distinction. For example, in "I am exhausted by all the work I have done", is it the case that (a) the work exhausted me [action] while I was doing it, and I am now still exhausted [state], or (b) the work is still exhausting me [action]? You can think of it either way, but I think of it as (a).

"All the work I have done exhausts me" does not seem quite right, because it suggests that the work 'does' an action to me now, but if this were the case we would expect the present continuous tense ("is exhausting me") – which also sounds odd, because I am no longer performing the work.

As you say, there is often hardly any practical difference between a passive and an adjectival construction. If you understand what a sentence means, there is no need to classify the construction as one or the other. It will not help you to understand it any better.

This is my final comment on this topic.
Topic: a participle can be a noun (original and derived nouns)
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 10:50:59 AM
A cooperator wrote:
Audiendus wrote:

Note that 'youth' can also mean a male person in late adolescence.


Do you mean
1. The fact/quality/state of being young:
I think his youth will be a disadvantage in this job.
2. The period of your life when you are young, especially the time between being a child and adult:
He was quite a good sportsman in his youth.

3. A word meaning boy or young man, especially a teenager, but I saw Oxford dictionary didn't refer to it.


I mean (3).
Topic: a participle can be a noun (original and derived nouns)
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 10:17:52 AM
A cooperator,

Your points are correct.
Topic: Then, vs Then
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 10:04:17 AM
The comma after "Then" (and the one after "First") are optional. It sounds more emphatic with the commas, especially the one after "Then" – as if one is thinking "And not only that, but also..."
Topic: a participle can be a noun (original and derived nouns)
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 9:02:45 AM
A cooperator wrote:
First, So, having said "The rule is different when we use the adjective alone as a noun; we use "the" to show that it functions as a noun (even though we do not mean specific people)", I understand that 'the blind,' 'the youth,' 'the visually impaired,', 'the visually challenged,', etc. don't mean specific people/person/users even although we use 'the'. If want it to mean specific people, we must use 'of' phrase (possession) after it. For example, "The poor of my country 'Yemen' are dramatically increasing." "The poor of my country 'Yemen' are not sympathized for."

Second, when looking up the 'the youth', I found it is can be used a collective noun referring to a group of young people as a single collective unit. I saw this example 'the youth
What kind of future do/does the youth of this country have?
The youth is/are the mainstay of the future.

So, 'the' in both sentences above can be thought of as to show that the adjective alone functions as a noun OR as a specific youth(the youth of that country, specifically, not other countries. ['The' is used before 'of' phrase (possession)]

Final, When we say "people", meaning people in general, we do not use "the", because we do not mean any specific people. On the other hand, when we say "the people", meaning any specific people, we do use "the" followed by 'of' phrase (possession) because we do mean any specific people:
The poor people/the smart people/the visually challenged people of the country .......

What you say above is grammatically correct, but see thar's post above.

Note that 'youth' can also mean a male person in late adolescence.
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 10:55:48 PM
bunyip
Topic: Is "who" missing?
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 10:26:35 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
"The police consider her to be his wife ...".
Correct me if I am wrong. Shouldn't it be "The police say she is his wife ..."? and hence 'who' should be used.

My view is as follows:

In "The police consider her to be his wife", the object of "consider" is "her", so "whom the police consider..." would be correct.

However, in "The police say (that) she is his wife", the object of "say" is not "she" or "her" (they do not "say her"), but the whole phrase "(that) she is his wife". "She" is the subject of "is", so "who the police say is his wife" is correct. The fact that "who" is split from "is his wife" makes no difference to the grammar.

The police say she is his wife.
...who the police say is his wife.

So I think you are correct.
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 9:25:18 AM
whitewashed

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