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Profile: Audiendus
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User Name: Audiendus
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Language, philosophy, music
Gender: Male
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Joined: Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Last Visit: Saturday, February 16, 2019 8:26:09 AM
Number of Posts: 5,440
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: State The Obvious or A Contradiction in Terms
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2019 8:22:17 AM
Mendicant beggars and mendacious liars outnumber mendicant liars and mendacious beggars.
Topic: Game of Adverbs
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2019 8:01:53 AM
artfully converted


retrospectively
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2019 7:57:47 AM
dwelt
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2019 7:52:45 AM
seventeenth
Topic: Words forever
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 9:26:00 PM
anthracite
Topic: is or are
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 9:04:34 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Lee said that she activated the town council, the National Environment Agency and the Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) to form a “Rats Task Force”. Lee said that when she found out that the “root cause” of the rats presence are cat-feeders who leave food out, she asked NEA to act but they could not.

Shouldn't it be "is" instead?

Yes, it should. The form of the verb should agree with its subject ("root cause"), not its complement (cat-feeders).
Topic: Could
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 8:54:03 PM
Atatürk wrote:
As far as grammar is concerned, the use of "could" for a specific event in the past is ungrammatical:

The traffic was very heavy on Saturday night, but I *could catch the train.

This sentence is OK if it refers to an ongoing possibility:

The traffic was very heavy on Saturday night, but I (knew that I) could catch the train if I wanted to.

But it is ungrammatical if it implies that I did catch the train. In that case we have to use "be able to":

The traffic was very heavy on Saturday night, but I was able to catch the train. [I did in fact catch it]

Atatürk wrote:
Now I wonder why the following is correct:

Jan couldn't wait for the meeting to end so that she *could go home.

This refers to a (later) ongoing possibility of going home, which would arise when the meeting ended. Once the meeting ended, she would be able to go home if she wanted to. We are not interested here in whether she actually went home (although presumably she did!).
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 8:26:38 AM
adduce
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 8:27:06 AM
invent
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 8:25:16 AM
modernist

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