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Profile: leonAzul
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User Name: leonAzul
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: musician, computer consultant
Interests: reading, bicycling, taijiquan
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, August 11, 2011
Last Visit: Saturday, November 18, 2017 6:11:14 AM
Number of Posts: 8,122
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: These are aloe vera.
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 5:48:42 AM
bihunsedap wrote:


He saw the aloe vera pots on the windows.

"What are these" he said.

"These are aloe vera."

"These are aloe vera pot."


When we not sure what the object he is asking. We tell him which one?


If you are not sure what the question is about exactly, you can ask "Do you mean the pots or the plants?"

In context, I would assume that the plants are what is being asked about.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 5:07:41 AM
Konstantin Frolov wrote:
Thank you for answering.

I'm afraid, however, the question still remains: what I was asking about is 'the short twenty years ... has taught me'


I'll listen again, perhaps I stopped too soon.Anxious

Indeed, I did! Sorry for the mistake.

The answer still is as above. The phrase "few twenty years" is treated logically as a single block of experience, as are the "short few terms I have been on Oxford Union committee".

Also, the topic of "mass nouns" is more relevant than my first suggestions. So far, I haven't found an article that addresses your question directly, but this from Wikipedia touches on it and gives sources for further reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_noun



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 5:06:37 AM
To answer the more general part of your question, the topics you want to search for are "collective nouns" and "number".

There is a feature of English that allows the use of an expression that is literally plural in number to be treated grammatically as if it were a singular thing. This can happen with an expression of time, which usually involves a continuum rather than separate moments, or when an expression of weight, volume, or items is to be considered as a singular lot.





"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 4:42:48 AM
Konstantin Frolov wrote:
Hello!

In the sentence over here, the speaker uses the subject '20 years' with has. I've seen some similar cases but I still don't feel how to use that in my language correctly. Could anyone please briefly expand on the topic or provide a reference as to where the material may be found in grammar books or something?

Thanks!


I believe that you have not heard this correctly. The selection begins: "The few twenty years I have spent…"

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'come undone' throughout lyrics
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 3:20:44 AM
How did you miss the best of all?

Guess Who - She's Come Undone

Quote:
It's too late.
She's gone too far.
She's lost the sun.
She's come undone!


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: full of a complete lack of money
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 3:10:52 AM
onsen wrote:
thar wrote:
It is a joke, a play with words.


Thank you very much, thar.

In what respects is it a joke, a play with words?



It uses the word "full" to express its opposite, "emptiness".

8^)

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: they called them self Fat.
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:28:54 PM
kingston124 wrote:
they means duo, who is them indicate?


The hands of a watch indicate the time. A pronoun refers to an antecedent.

There is no occurrence of the word "them" in the context you have given, so I have sod-all idea what you are on about.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: The pork is cooking
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:14:10 PM
bihunsedap wrote:
I cooked marinated pork.

It's twenty minutes to go to get done.

"I'm hungry." he said.

"Wait. It's almost dinner time. The pork is cooking."

How do I tell him the pork is in the oven and still cooking?


You have answered your question: tell him the pork is still cooking and won't be ready for twenty minutes.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: they called them self Fat.
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:10:20 PM
kingston124 wrote:
Jimmy said to Sadie Logan:

Jimmy: Now the story goes that John Denver, he was playin' at this little ol' place called the Cellar Door in Washington, D.C...around Christmas time in 1970. His opening act was this husband and wife duo, named Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert and they called them self Fat City.

What is "they" indicate?

Source: Logan Lucky 2017


Best practice has a pronoun refer to the nearest noun which is "duo" in this example. "They" has the duo of "Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert" as its antecedent.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Your Favorite Song
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:31:29 PM
Make Me Smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Btq4MnwvQgM

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."

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