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Profile: leonAzul
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User Name: leonAzul
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: musician, computer consultant
Interests: reading, bicycling, taijiquan
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, August 11, 2011
Last Visit: Sunday, April 22, 2018 4:41:38 PM
Number of Posts: 8,170
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Collection of Bridges big and small
Posted: Sunday, April 22, 2018 3:55:03 PM
Tappanzee Bridge(s) [new and old] at sunset



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: word association(Psychoanalysis)
Posted: Sunday, April 22, 2018 3:48:13 PM
neigh

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: detainment vs detention
Posted: Sunday, April 22, 2018 3:14:44 PM
Hemant Patel 1 wrote:
And what about confinement, incarceration and imprisonment? Any difference between detention, detainment and detainer


It might make a difference to the detainee.
Whistle



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: The Operating System Windows 95.
Posted: Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:46:49 PM
thar wrote:
Ha, busted - so it was all faked!

'Wiped the video' my arse. Pull the other one! Whistle


It's got bells on't.

Applause

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: The Operating System Windows 95.
Posted: Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:25:28 PM
thar wrote:
Someone has to keep this stuff alive.
They recently had to send commands to reactivate the Trajectory Manoeuvring Thrusters of Voyager 1 that hadn't been used since it passed Jupiter in 1980.
And the commands for which were written in code before the launch in 1977.

For the supertech programmers at JPL it must have been like having to learn to write in Ancient Babylonian! Whistle





Fortunately, the cultures of academics and researchers — and no small amount of peer pressure — have strongly encouraged adequate documentation of non-trivial code, often in-line with the code itself.

Unfortunately, engineers and managers, for good reasons, are not so likely to conserve documentation for microprocessors and their particular machine languages when the chips are likely to be outdated within a year or two anyway. It is enough to know that something works or doesn't, so hold on to the former and lose the latter as excess baggage.

JPL falls firmly in the former case. I'm quite confident that they recorded and archived every step and miss-step along the way, including the debugging tools and development libraries.

NASA not so much. Typical of the non-archival mindset was around the time of the thirtieth anniversary of the first moon landing, when it was discovered that several containers of videotape and film had been incorrectly labeled, so the actual recordings of the first landing were erased or discarded instead of the training and simulations. This led to a great deal of embarrassment, not to mention all sorts of wacky conspiracy theories that still won't die.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Neither...nor usage
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 4:30:14 AM
Hemant Patel 1 wrote:
Is it correct to use at the begining of the sentence below?

Neither he has done any homework, nor has he brought any of his books to class.


That is correct; the sense is that both clauses are negative.

However, the verb needs to be in second position in the first clause as it is in the second clause to sound most natural.

"Neither has he done any homework, nor has he brought any of his books to class."


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: two definitions of 'mummy'
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 4:19:25 AM
onsen wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
"Body" can mean either a living or dead person/animal.


Thank you very much, palapaguy.

I can’t understand the phrase 'a body of a human'. The phrase seems to suggest that 'a human' possesses more than two bodies, which is impossible.



That's because the definition answers the question, "What is a mummy?"

Most native speakers in America would also understand the word "mummy" to mean a corpse that has been prepared for burial with herbs and ointments and then wrapped in strips of linen or other fabric.

Mummification is the preservation of the flesh of a dead animal through a similar process, whether by design or natural accident.

Quote:
3. mummification - embalmment and drying a dead body and wrapping it as a mummy







"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Be drawn to fire
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 12:09:42 AM
ClaireNguyen wrote:
Hi all,

I am seeking the meaning of "be drawn to fire" on Internet, but I have just found the phrase "draw fire".
Please help me explain its meaning in the following sentence:"Behind every apparently sensible scientist is a child who was irrationally drawn to fire".

I am not sure whether "draw to fire" is a phrase or each is an independent verb. If it is the latter, then I think "draw" here is "choose". When looking for "fire" in the Oxford Dictionary, however, I have discovered that most of the meanings of "fire" is a transitive verb.





In this context the sentence could be paraphrased as: "Behind every apparently sensible scientist is a child who was irrationally attracted to fire". This pattern can be described as "to be drawn to something", which means to be attracted or lured by something.

The phrase "to draw fire" means something very different: to provoke an attack.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Reform of the Calendar
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 11:20:20 PM
Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
Hello, everybody!

I "tested" this idea on another forum some time ago and got mixed reactions. But the idea doesn't go out of my mind - so simple, logical and fruitful it seems to me. So I wonder what the reactions will be this time.

It has to do with the calendar most countries use these days.

The calendar we are currently using is rather clumsy, isn't it? With months of unequal duration (28/29/30/31 days), and months not streamlined with weeks. This is like measuring distance in miles and kilometers at the same time, using different measures for different purposes- e.g. kilometers for marking distance between places and at the same time using miles per hour for measuring speed, so you'd have to make a complex calculation each time you want to know how many hours it'll take you to cover 700 km at the speed of 70 miles/hr.

What I propose is a calendar that contains 13 months , each lasting for exactly 4 weeks (28 days). So each month would begin on Monday and finish on Sunday. Every year the same thing.

13 months * 28 days = 364 days.

The remaining one day (or two days in a leap year) I propose to designate a special name, not part of any month or week, make it the first day (or the first two days in a leap year) of the year and just call it "New Year 20XX". For most people it's a holiday anyway. The labor contracts would need to provide separately for compensation for a New Year day if one may have to work that day.

So the proposed new calendar goes like this:

00/01/2019 New Year 2019

01/01/2019 Monday
...
01/07/2019 Sunday
01/08/2019 Monday
...
...
01/28/2019 Sunday

02/01/2019 Monday
...
...
...
13/28/2019 Sunday (last day of 2019)

00/01/2020 New Year 2020
00/02/2020 ... we'll need to invent a good name for this day that will happen only once in 4 years, in leap years. What about Celestial Day 2020?

01/01/2020 Monday
etc...

No need to check with calendars, everything's streamlined and simple.
What do you think of this?







The problem with a 13 month annual calendar is that it doesn't neatly divide the year into halves and quarters, although, like the 7 day week, it does more closely align with the approximately 13 lunations of 28—29 days per annum.

Most historical calendars try one formula or another to reconcile these essentially non-aligned periodic events. A similar "reasonable" solution would be 12 months in 4 and 5 week patterns, like A:4-5-4, B:4-5-4, C:4-5-4, D:4-5-4, with intercalary days between groups B and C or D and A as required.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Help with survey design?
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 6:38:10 PM
The questions and choices of response seem clear and meaningful to me.

I assume this survey is directed at current and former drivers for the district. Could you please explain how the results would be translated into a recruitment effort?



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."

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