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User Name: NancyUK
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Joined: Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, April 27, 2017 9:49:40 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: I want buy you a coffee for your kindness. Do you have time?
Posted: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 10:23:26 AM
Nikitus wrote:
Hello.

First of all, thanks for all your time and help to improve my english.

I want to ask about the following:



-I want to buy you a coffee for your kindness. Do you have time?

At the suggestion, Kevin was silent for a few seconds, staring at his watch. After responding positively to Kimberly, she began to walk decidedly, almost as if she knew the streets of the city. She chose a "The Sea of the Poet's" which had always had very good comments. After entering, they sat near the window.[/color]


I have the following questions:

Is it "I want to buy you a coffee for your kindness. Do you have time?" correct?


This is fine, but it sounds a little awkward. Alternative suggestions:

May I buy you a coffee to thank you/as a thank you for your kindness? ... (More grammatically correct)
Can I buy you a coffee ... (More colloquial)

Is it "At the suggestion, Kevin was silent for a few seconds, staring at his watch" correct?

Sounds fine to me, but I would suggest: At her suggestion..."

Is it "After responding positively to Kimberly, she began to walk decidedly, almost as if she knew the streets of the city." correct?

This sounds OK, but I would rephrase it slightly to "After responding in the positive to Kimberly, she began to walk purposefully, ... This means he said "Yes", whereas responding positively could just mean he was generally encouraging. Decidedly is OK, but purposefully seems more appropriate to me.

Is it "She chose (a) "The Sea of the Poet's" which had always had very good comments. After entering, they sat near the window." correct?

Omit the indefinite article, or the definite article if it is a chain of coffee shops. I'm not sure why, but perhaps it is the indefinite immediate followed by the definite article that just seems wrong. Perhaps one of the grammar gurus can explain it, or tell me I'm wrong!

Also, the title of the shop doesn't seem right to me - I don't think there should be an apostrophe there unless there is a word missing. The Sea of the Poets (plural) or The Sea of the Poet's Imagination (possessive).



Just a note about the form of the questions - they should either be:

Is "..." correct?
OR
Is it "..."? Correct?

Edit: Crossed posts with Drag0

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: gunner’s stores
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 2:30:23 PM
Hi vkhu

I think it's just the powder (gunpowder) and shot (pellets).

Gunner
2. (Military) navy (formerly) a warrant officer responsible for the training of gun crews, their performance in action, and accounting for ammunition

Stores
Supplies, especially of food, clothing, or arms.

Powder
A dry explosive mixture, such as gunpowder.

Shot, pl shot
A solid projectile designed to be discharged from a firearm or cannon.
Pl Such projectiles, especially when fired in clusters, considered as a group.
Pl Tiny lead or steel pellets, especially ones used in a shotgun cartridge.
One of these pellets.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Crowding stuff to lighten up the weight?
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 12:34:59 PM
There are a lot of nautical terms and idioms in this.

Crowd all sail, or crowd sail are familiar idioms (to me at least) but then he's changed sail to canvas, so it's another nautical term on top of the idiom.

Crowd sail

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Can anybody help me ? "Bagpipe(s)"
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 12:30:30 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Officially" it is always (so far as I know) plural.
I've never seen a single bagpipe - though you never know.

It's a 'set of pipes'.



I thought the same thing as you, Drag0, but being a bit OCD I checked first. Surprisingly in BE up until the late 1800s the singular was predominant, being used 2 or 3 times more often than the plural. Even now, the difference is rather small.

Ngram viewer British English

Edit: to correct mistake (used singular twice, when I meant plural the second time.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Can anybody help me ? "Bagpipe(s)"
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 11:23:41 AM
Luc51 wrote:
Is this song title correct? :

Back Home With The Bagpipes Sound

Bagpipes or bagpipe ?
Sound of the bagpipes or bagpipe(s) sound ?

Many thanks.


I would recommend:

Back Home with the Bagpipe's Sound (singular bagpipe)
Back Home with the Bagpipes' Sound (plural bagpipes)

Minor words such as with and the are not usually capitalised.

You can use the singular - bagpipe, or the plural - bagpipes, although the plural is perhaps a bit more commonly used and makes more sense to me, as there are numerous pipes involved! (I know they have technical names; chanter and drones, for example.)

Bagpipe is also a term for a chatterbox, although probably not very common.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: help me understand this sentence
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 10:17:28 AM
Hi vkhu

My guess is that it means something like this:

They had arrived at the river mouth on a ship. They had not been there long, and were expecting to be able to ride the tide up the river, however the wind was blowing too hard in an unfavourable direction to allow this. They waited four or five days, but by then the wind was blowing even harder.

Rid - maybe archaic past participle of ride? The boat rode the waves, the sea.
Tide - v.intr. Nautical To drift or ride with the tide: tided off the reef; tiding up the Hudson.
Fresh - (of wind) moderately strong or brisk.

Edit: As to the use of but - when you add archaic language and old-fashioned usage, it makes things exponentially more difficult. However, here goes another round of guessing...

It might be that the "buts" are used like this:

But #1: (usually used after a negative) without it happening or being the case that: we never go out but it rains.
But #2: (foll by that) except that: nothing is impossible but that we live forever.


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: for from the moment that they rather put me into the boat than that I might be said to go in
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 10:02:59 AM
Hi vkhu

I read it to mean that he was forcibly manhandled into the boat, and did not get into it willingly.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: What does these sentences mean #2?
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 8:20:44 AM
QP wrote:
Dear friends,

Please see below:-

We tracked the John down to this fish place on City Island. The Poseidon Adventure or some shit. The John's buttons are all over the place.
They're doing calamari and clams. Having a real time of it. Real pleased with themselves.

I don't understand the above two bold sentences. Can anyone help?

Thank you
QP


Using real in this way means very - from TFD:

real adv.
12. Informal. very or extremely: You did a real nice job.

Note that this is colloquial and not good grammar, but it is the way many people speak.

Having a time of it is often defined as having a hard time, but here it clearly means they are having a real (very) good time.

Real pleased with themselves ~ Very self-satisfied.

See the definition of the idiom below:
Pleased with someone or something

By adding real and themselves to the idiom, turns it from a positive to a negative connotation.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Semi colon
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 5:24:38 AM
Hi Dubai

Have a look at the definition for semicolons in TFD (The Farlex Grammar Book):

semicolon
Semicolons ( ; ) are used for two main purposes: to separate lengthy or complex items within a list and to connect independent clauses. They are often described as being more powerful than commas, while not quite as a strong as periods (full stops).

Edit: Each place that the writer has lived consists of the name of a town and state in the USA (except Washington, DC which is the capital of the USA and not an actual state, as I understand it), so the pause between the town and state is shorter than that between each place and the next.

Edit2: Just seen that your question comes from today's Daily Grammar Lesson. The first edit above should explain it - it's a list of items that already contain commas.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Has been reprimanded
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 10:04:43 AM
As well as being in the past tense as FounDit explained, the sentence is also in the passive voice.

It could be changed to:

Rohit Sharma was reprimanded by the match referee ...

This is simple past tense, passive voice (the subject of the verb receives the action). The passive voice was used because it is the receiver of the action who is important in this sentence - Rohit Sharma - rather than the referee.

Another option is to use the active voice, but then you will see that the referee becomes more important in the sentence:

The match referee reprimanded Rohit Sharma ...

This is simple past tense, active voice (the subject of the verb performs the action on the object).

Edited for clarity.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash

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