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Profile: NancyUK
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User Name: NancyUK
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Joined: Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 11:25:50 AM
Number of Posts: 667
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: go to bed' vs 'go to sleep'
Posted: Thursday, June 01, 2017 11:53:37 AM
Hi Koh Elaine

You can lie in bed all night, wide awake.
You can fall asleep while driving your car.

Go to bed - get into bed.
Go to sleep - fall asleep, regardless of where you may be.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: At his apartment, Kevin began to wrote down
Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 11:39:02 AM
Nikitus wrote:

Is it correct to write "At his apartment, Kevin began to wrote down maniacally in his copybook the "patterns" of the wooden cubes that had crafted letters of the alphabet."

I don't really know what you mean by this sentence, but there are some problems. As Wilmar noted, the tenses are mixed up. He began to write, or he wrote. Did you really mean maniacally - like a maniac? Or manically - with frenetic activity?
Both bear a suggestion of madness.


Is it correct to write "He also used the flyer and other papers he got on his last walk on the streets of the city."

This is fine, but got would be better replaced by something such as collected. It's not incorrect, but is very generic.

Is it correct to write "So which words we`ve got here? flood, iron and vessels."

The tense isn't quite right here either. "So which words have we got here? .." Got is OK in speech, because that is how people often speak.

Is it correct to write "I am closer to decode the message"


No, again not quite. Closer to decoding, or closer to being able to decode the message.

Thanks.




I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Time flies very fast.
Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 11:14:33 AM
Hi Koh Elaine

I would say no - for two reasons.

Fly already means to move very fast.
This is an idiom, and if you use an idiom it's best to quote it exactly unless you are an expert in the language, and want to play with words.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: What is this sentence?
Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 10:12:29 AM
In view of the additional context, in my opinion he is saying that, since he used to be a butcher, he is used to the smell and sight of blood, raw meat and offal, so he is able to bear the gory nature of the crime scenes, or sites of the crimes, where he has to clear up blood and possibly other bodily fluids as well, and may encounter decay and other smells.

Edit: Crossed posts with Drag0 again!

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: What the meaning of this sentence?
Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 9:59:38 AM
Romany wrote:

Drago - but this bloke's a street-sweeper. Who the hell would try to mug the poor sod?

In big cities in the US, I think they sweep the streets very early. This could the the sort of time when criminals or addicts are around, having been out all night. There wouldn't be many other people about at that time, so a "shoot first, ask questions afterwards" strategy might be understandable.

Drug addicts don't need a lot of money - they might just want a "dime bag" (if I have that right), which I guess is $10 worth of whatever is their drug of choice.

Edit: crossed posts with Drag0

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: What is this sentence?
Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 9:37:28 AM
More context is needed to tell, but is there an intended play on words here, or just a misspelling (sites/sights)?

It helped with the smells, as far as stomaching the sites.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: What the meaning of this sentence?
Posted: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 8:57:34 AM
Perhaps froggy doesn't have anything directly to do with violence, but simply refers to someone being "jumpy".

In a city with a high murder rate, in order to survive you might need to be on the lookout for people who are jumpy and preempt their possible aggression. Someone may be jumpy for any number of reasons; they may be hyped up on drugs, and may erupt into violence; they may be planning to mug or rob someone, so they are hyped up on adrenaline; they may be schizophrenic or psychotic, and otherwise mentally unstable and prone to violence.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: there was not such a few as that we had no cause of apprehension
Posted: Tuesday, May 30, 2017 8:51:25 AM
Hi vkhu

In my view, there were a lot of wolves. The echo made it sound as if there were twice as many - an enormous number, but even taking that into account there were not so few that they didn't need to worry about them.

Edited: to correct tense agreement etc.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: ...regardless of their background/backgrounds or circumstances.
Posted: Thursday, May 25, 2017 8:39:11 AM
Hi Koh Elaine

In my view, it could be either.

The pronoun their can be used to refer to multiple people, in which case it would be their backgrounds.

Their can also be used to refer to a single individual, either an unidentified individual, or to avoid using the awkward his/her option, in which case it would be their background - preferred (see below).

TFD

Their pronoun

2. (used after an indefinite singular antecedent in place of the definite form his or her): Someone left their book on the table.

Your sentence refers to everyone, which also has the following usage notes:

everyone – everybody
1. 'everyone' and 'everybody'
You usually use everyone or everybody to refer to all the people in a particular group.
The police had ordered everyone out of the office.
There wasn't enough room for everybody.
There is no difference in meaning between everyone and everybody, but everyone is more common in written English, and everybody is more common in spoken English.
You can also use everyone and everybody to talk about people in general.
Everyone has the right to freedom of expression.
Everybody has to die some day.
After everyone or everybody you use a singular form of a verb.
Everyone wants to find out what is going on.
Everybody is selling the same product.
2. referring back
When you are referring back to everyone or everybody, you usually use they, them, or their.
Will everyone please carry on as best they can.
Everybody had to bring their own paper.

Edited to improve clarity, without changing the meaning.


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: How to avoid the repetition of 'receiving Gojukai'.
Posted: Thursday, May 25, 2017 8:19:20 AM
Hi Koh Elaine

Since all of the references to Gojukai occur close together in one sentence and all follow the same structure, after specifying "Gojukai" in the first clause, thereafter you can use "it" instead.

In January 2017, 156 believers received Gojukai; in February 2017, 90 believers received it; and in March 2017, 93 believers received it. These are great achievements and we are determined to keep up our momentum.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash

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