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Profile: NancyUK
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User Name: NancyUK
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Joined: Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, August 17, 2017 11:14:17 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: A question about emphasize - do/did
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 7:48:56 AM
thar wrote:
NUK
Do you mean 'didn't do'? Or 'haven't done'?


Yes, of course you are right. An incomplete job of editing made my response a complete nonsense!

Two versions, which I ended up mixing together d'oh! :

"You didn't do your homework yet, did you?"
"You haven't done your homework yet, have you?"

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: A question about emphasize - do/did
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 2:04:48 PM
Carlos Eduardo 7 wrote:
Hello everyone.

Is it correct to say/write in English "I did do my homework" so as to emphasize it?

Best regards and thank you.


Yes, it is correct to write or say this for emphasis. It would normally be in response to a question such as:

"You didn't done your homework yet, did you?"

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: The fall foliage on the other side was heartbreaking in its brilliance.
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 10:48:24 AM
Maggie Q wrote:
They watched as the Dome’s dirty surface rose swiftly into the air. The fall foliage on the other side was heartbreaking in its brilliance.


Question: in its brilliance --- In this case, ‘in’ is a) used to indicate the conditions that are around someone or something; b) used to indicate the color of something; Which one is correct in this case, a) or b)?


Hmm, tricky.

I think it is part of an adverbial phrase:

In what way was the fall foliage heartbreaking? It was heartbreaking in its brilliance.

This is using in as follows (TFD Collins):

in prep
Indicating a state, situation, or condition

But having said that, I'm not 100% sure.



I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: Outside out, fold
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 9:26:23 AM
Joe Kim wrote:
You've got a (file of lundry) pile of laundry and now need to fold it nicely. Some are inside out. How would give an instruction to a person for this state of garment to fold?
1. First, flip so the outside is in, then fold.
2. Outside out, fold.
3. Inside in, fold.

Hi JK

There are a few problems with the above. Do you want everything folded with the outside on the outside? If so, the easiest way to say this (in my opinion) is:

1. Ensure everything is right-side out
2. Fold.

Here is a link to this term: Right-side out


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: line of country
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 10:03:37 AM
OK, so what this character is saying is that he might kill one or more people if it benefited him in some way, but there is no obvious link between all of the people invited, who are being murdered.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: line of country
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 9:47:32 AM
If I remember correctly, in 10 Little Indians the guests at the hotel or country house are killed off one by one? So I presume that is the mass clearance mentioned, and it must be towards the end when quite a few people have been bumped off already!

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: line of country
Posted: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 9:39:09 AM
Hi KV

TFD doesn't always have all the well-known idioms.

Oxford Dictionary idiom

Edit: Sorry, didn't actually explain the meaning! It is one's area of expertise or knowledge.

I wonder if it might be a fox-hunting term - when you are galloping across the countryside chasing a fox, if you don't know the area you wouldn't know what line to take across the country. Just a guess on my part.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: fewer vs less
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 10:48:59 AM
In my opinion it should be fewer.

Usage note from TFD (Collins):

Usage: Less should not be confused with fewer. Less refers strictly only to quantity and not to number: there is less water than before. Fewer means smaller in number: there are fewer people than before.

Or if you wish to describe the number, it is smaller.



I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: is /are
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 10:44:20 AM
Sounds like two subjects therefore plural verb to me.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Topic: stiff whiskey
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 8:04:42 AM
Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
Thank you, Sarrriesfan and Thar!

So it's non-diluted whiskey. But it does not connotate that the whiskey is "stronger than normal", does it? I mean, as far as I know, whiskies range from 40 to 55 alc.proof or even more, so "stiff whiskey" is not necessarily one of those stronger ones, is it?



I'm not sure that I agree that a stiff whiskey is necessarily without any dilution. A neat whiskey is certainly whiskey with nothing added at all, but you could pour a double whiskey and add a splash of soda, and it would still be a stiff whiskey in my opinion.

I don't think the term stiff relates to the relative proof of different whiskeys - just to whether anything much has been added to it.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash

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