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Profile: ahmetwrt
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User Name: ahmetwrt
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: English Teacher
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Gender: Male
Home Page http://www.setsenglish.site90.com
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Joined: Saturday, May 21, 2011
Last Visit: Monday, January 11, 2016 3:38:47 PM
Number of Posts: 124
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Is that correct or not?
Posted: Saturday, January 09, 2016 5:00:49 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I also thought that the rule is not really correct.

"How many books do you have?"
"Well, I have some." (thinks) "Not sure. Probably more than fifty and less than a hundred."

"How much water is there?"
(checks all five bottles) "Oh, there's some left in this one."
"We don't have any."


But don't you think it would seem incorrect to use "some" (as it is an "indefinite number/amount") in a sentence like:

How many people are there in the room?
There are some people.
(Not a satisfying answer at all, since the asker wants an exact (or nearly exact at least, such as "nearly ten, more than twenty, etc.") number.)


I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: Is that correct or not?
Posted: Thursday, January 07, 2016 8:44:48 PM
One grammar book I have been reading says "some" and "any" can't be used in answers to "How many/How much".
I understand why "some" can't be used, but is the use of "any" (with "not" of course) incorrect too?

For example:

How many books do you have?
I don't have any/any books.

How much water is there?
There isn't any/any water.

How many people are there in the room?
There aren't any/any people.


I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: in/on?
Posted: Saturday, December 12, 2015 1:41:18 PM
Dear native English speakers, which of these sentences is/are correct? And is there any difference in meaning between them?


1-It destroyed everything on its way.
2-It destroyed everything in its way.
3-It destroyed everything on its path.
4-It destroyed everything in its path.






I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: "It is not very me"
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 1:59:29 PM
It is not very me.

Is this expression British or American? Could native speakers of English tell me about the origin -whether it is British or American- and how common it is. Probably not at all common, I searched on Google, only 27 entries!

I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: is or are?
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2015 5:34:59 PM
Which one is correct?

How much is two kilos of apples?
How much are two kilos of apples?

And what would be the answer?

a) It is $2.
b) They are $2.


I know it is possible to ask and answer the question in different ways, without having to use the verb "to be", but I just want to know what should native speakers say in such a situation. Thank you.

I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: Be over
Posted: Thursday, June 25, 2015 10:37:40 AM
"My headache/flu etc. is over."

Is it common and natural to use "to be over" with illnesses as in the above example?

What are the common and natural expressions to use after recovering from an illness?

For example:

"My headache is gone/has gone (away)." Is it OK?

I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: Where vs What
Posted: Saturday, May 23, 2015 4:13:30 AM
Is it common to say "Where's that?", putting your finger on a map, to ask the name of a city/country?

Normally, I'd use the question above while asking the location of a town/city/country.



A-I come from Paris.
B-Where's that?
A-It's in France.
B-Where's France?
A-It's in Europe.


And If I were to ask the name of a city, I'd say "What's this city? / What's the name of this city?"




I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: Which one?
Posted: Friday, May 22, 2015 3:14:06 PM
#1 What could be the answer?
#2 What could the answer be?


Which one is correct? Both? Any difference?

I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: It/He?
Posted: Sunday, May 17, 2015 3:47:41 PM


Thanks for the answer Romany, and for the joke Chris. Angel

Lastly, what about this one?

Who's your maths teacher?
It's Mr Dawson.


Is it OK and common to use, or would you suggest another reply?



I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!
Topic: It/He?
Posted: Sunday, May 17, 2015 5:13:39 AM
Thanks for your answer Chris.

What about this one:

Who are those men?
They are Harry and Jack. / Those are Harry and Jack. / It is Harry and Jack.

Which is/are fine and which is/are not?

I just need the answers; no need to get confused! Unless it is very necessary, let's not talk about other issues!

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