The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: prince
About
User Name: prince
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Sunday, September 12, 2010
Last Visit: Friday, August 18, 2017 1:20:04 PM
Number of Posts: 456
[0.05% of all post / 0.18 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: train had left
Posted: Friday, August 18, 2017 1:20:04 PM
Applause Applause
sureshot wrote:
prince wrote:
I just want to emphasize she was late by an Hour hence she missed the train and I'm reporting this fact after an year( time frame doesn't matter)

**********
The second one has the train leaving as the earlier, so this sequence is -
1. The train had left (an hour ago - an hour before now)
2. After the train left, but sometime before now, she arrived.
3. Now I am saying this.

"Ago" always relates to the present 'now'.

[/quote]
__________________

"Ago" is used to say how much time has passed from the time something happened to now, the time of speaking. "Before" is used to say how much time passed from the time something happened to a time in the past. If the situation happened a year ago from now, the narration should be:

- She arrived at the station but the train had left an hour before. (= before her arrival at the station) [/quote]
Topic: train had left
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 3:24:48 PM
I just want to emphasize she was late by an Hour hence she missed the train and I'm reporting this fact after an year( time frame doesn't matter)

**********
The second one has the train leaving as the earlier, so this sequence is -
1. The train had left (an hour ago - an hour before now)
2. After the train left, but sometime before now, she arrived.
3. Now I am saying this.

"Ago" always relates to the present 'now'.

[/quote][/quote]
Topic: train had left
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 3:18:34 PM
Applause Applause Applause
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I agree - the first one seems to infer some other action occurred after she had arrived, but does not make it clear.

The past perfect "had arrived" or "had <done>" is always used for the earlier of two past time-periods.

Therefore the sequence must be -
1. She had arrived at the station.
2. After that the train left.
3. An hour after that, I am saying this.

**********
The second one has the train leaving as the earlier, so this sequence is -
1. The train had left (an hour ago - an hour before now)
2. After the train left, but sometime before now, she arrived.
3. Now I am saying this.

"Ago" always relates to the present 'now'.

Topic: train had left
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 3:18:15 PM
Applause Applause
georgieporgie wrote:
prince wrote:
She had arrived at the station but the train left an hour ago.

She arrived at the station but the train had left an hour ago.

Which of the above statements are correct. Please advise me

Thank you



The second statement is correctly written, but would be better as "but the train had left an hour earlier".

In the first, "the train left an hour ago" appears to based on the time the writer made the statement rather than on the time she arrived. It's unclear.
Topic: train had left
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 12:39:09 PM
She had arrived at the station but the train left an hour ago.

She arrived at the station but the train had left an hour ago.



Which of the above statements are correct. Please advise me


Thank you

Topic: lore
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 11:12:13 AM
He had taught the children something of the forest lore that he had himself learned from Tiger Lily and Tinker Bell, and knew that in their dire hour they were not likely to forget it.


He (had) taught the children something of the forest lore that he had himself learned from Tiger Lily and Tinker Bell, and knew that in their dire hour they were not likely to forget it



Kindly advise me the difference with HAD and without HAD in the above para.


Thank you

Prince


Topic: as far as my understanding
Posted: Friday, June 02, 2017 10:49:42 AM
is it correct grammatically to say " as far as my understanding is concerned we all will become extinct in the next 200 years".


Please correct me if I was wrong.


Thank you




Topic: Removing commas (,)
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 6:47:53 AM
Unlike many WWW sites, this site, to be known as hpq.net, is a software-driven database application using Microsoft Site Builder with ASP coding and the MS-SQL database.

let me write the above sentence the same way but I remove commas(,). "Unlike many WWW sites this site to be known as SQE.net is a software-driven database application using Microsoft Site Builder with ASP coding and the MS-SQL database".

Please explain the difference in the meaning ,if changed, by removing commas(,).


Thank you

Prince
Topic: atleast vs within
Posted: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 2:40:28 PM
sureshot wrote:
prince wrote:
Can someone explain the difference between atleast 4 months before the expiry date and the within 4 months before the expiry date?

Thank you

Prince

_________________

At least 4 months before the expiry date: It means that the action/activity should be completed a minimum of 4 months before the expiry date. Say, the expiry date is 30 Sep 2017. The action/event should be finished/completed before 31 May 2017.

Within 4 months before the expiry date: The activity/action should be done in the time span of 4 months before the expiry date. Say, the expiry date is 30 Sep 2017. The action/event should be finished/completed within the 4 month period i.e. between 01 Jun 2017 and 31 May 2017.




What about the action to be completed any time between may 31 2017 to 30th September 2017?
Topic: atleast vs within
Posted: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 12:03:45 PM
Can someone explain the difference between atleast 4 months before the expiry date and the within 4 months before the expiry date?

Thank you

Prince

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.