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Profile: mohican
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User Name: mohican
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Tuesday, August 24, 2010
Last Visit: Wednesday, April 06, 2011 12:21:14 PM
Number of Posts: 285
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: tell me this
Posted: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 8:18:00 AM
thar wrote:
I think you need the word chronological for this type of question, because people can be listed or ranked in so many different ways.
Where does x come in the chronological list of yyys.

Clumsy, but then again, apart from Americans, who have this weird quirk of numbering their presidents, is this a much-asked type of question? I have never asked it in my life, and do not envision ever needing to! Normally your intent is clear from the context of the question anyway.


Thanks for your useful reply. M.

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: tell me this
Posted: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 6:55:53 AM
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
mohican wrote:
What about this: "Which president is Obama in the line of the USA presidents?"


This question does not bring you the answer as 44th.


It was a tentative question, so I agree that it doesn't have to bring about the intended answer.

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: Use of 'No sooner'
Posted: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 6:41:39 AM
thar wrote:
no sooner than means two things

in the one contruction it means not before
I am going finish this no sooner than wednesday
= not before then, then or after that.

or it means just after
no sooner had did I reach the station, than the train left
= immediately after I reached the station, the train left.

in your example
no sooner did I reach the station, than the train left
ie
the train left as soon as I reached the station.

I don't think you want your enquiry to be liquidated. That means killed (with people) or sold off (with assets!)


Hi Thar,

I wonder whether it is a typo on your part or it is a construction I'm not aware of: "no sooner had did I reach the station, than the train left". I think it should be rather like that: No sooner had I reached/did I reach the station than the train left. What troubles me is the wording "had did" here.


When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: tell me this
Posted: Tuesday, March 08, 2011 5:05:26 PM
What about this: "Which president is Obama in the line of the USA presidents?"

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: Who or that
Posted: Monday, March 07, 2011 5:36:16 PM
williamstdd wrote:
Of these two sentences, which is correct?
1) The managers who came to work.
2) The managers that came to work.

And, what are the rules?

Thank God I had a copy editor for my book.


Here, the rules are:

i. The relative pronoun 'who', which is the subject of the sentence ('who' = 'The managers'), is normally used in defining relative clauses with persons as their subjects. So, the 1) is correct, the 2) isn't.

ii. The relative pronouns 'who(m)' and 'that' could be used interchangeably, or both omitted altogether, if the noun 'the managers' was put in the sentence as the object of the verb: The managers [who(m)/that] we met at the conference last week. (The noun 'The managers' is the object of the transitive verb 'met' here; 'we met the managers'.)



When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: TheFreeDictionary Nominated for "Best Reference Site," Vote Now
Posted: Sunday, March 06, 2011 4:03:49 PM
+1 for TFD.

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: 'like a hole in the wall'
Posted: Sunday, March 06, 2011 8:05:12 AM
srkdr68 wrote:
Is it correct to say 'my multi storey office is just like a hole in the Empire State Building'


Yes, it is. I'd rather write 'multistorey' instead of 'multi storey'. But a simile in the sentence is a weird one.

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: English question
Posted: Saturday, March 05, 2011 6:56:30 PM
HomeworkLovinFreak wrote:
Hello and I'm Josana and I wanted to know if any of the following are Metaphors or personification :

Crystal Clear
Bubbling hot
rocking wind
Shaking cold
THANK YOU AND GOODBYE LOVE,JOSANA

!


Hi,

"Crystal Clear" a metaphor in: very clearly stated, understood.

"Bubbling hot" a metaphor in: bubling hot pot/bubbling hot with passion.

"Rocking wind" a metaphor in: rocking wind of change.

"Shaking cold" a metaphor in: shaking cold sweats.

You need a context to determine whether such expressions are metaphors or not, for example, bubbling hot lava is not a metaphor whereas bubbling hot pot is.

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: The F game
Posted: Saturday, March 05, 2011 4:48:43 PM
Felicity.

When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler
Topic: We elected him chairman
Posted: Saturday, March 05, 2011 10:08:20 AM
Al Blanco wrote:
Why in sentences like ‘we elected him chairman’ the articles are not used?
As far as I understand it it is not correct to say ‘we elected him a chairman’ or ‘we elected him the chairman’ (or it is possible?)

why so? Is it a feature of the pattern or words like 'president', 'chairman' etc should be used without articles?



Hi,

In a situation in which a person plays a unique role in an organization (of a government, charity, business) and has got a special job title, position, etc. there, we can leave out the definitive article when we use their titles or position names in the context of the organization: We elected him chairman/She was appointed as secretary.

Note: if you talk about the chairman and the secretary describing them as private persons, out of their organization context, you use the article: The chairman of our charity school is a retired headmaster/The secretary is married to the boss.



When I split an infinitive, god damn it, I split it so it stays split. Raymond Chandler

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