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Profile: coag
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User Name: coag
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, March 27, 2010
Last Visit: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 2:33:39 AM
Number of Posts: 1,281
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: oyster
Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 12:47:24 AM
Interesting. It never occurred to me that "oyster" might be related to ost- "bone". Now that I know it, it seems natural, obvious.

The band name Blue Oyster Cult doesn't have anything to do with "oysters" (I just learned that from Wikipedia). I like the band's song "(Don't Fear) The Reaper".

Daemon wrote:
fornix - The upper shell of an oyster.

When I saw this, my first thought was: could it be somehow related to "fornication". Yes, it is.

fornix (n.)
from 1680s in reference to various arched formations (especially in anatomy), from Latin fornix "arch, vaulted chamber, cellar, vaulted opening," probably an extension, based on appearance, from a source akin to fornus "brick oven of arched or domed shape" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm").

fornication (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French fornicacion "fornication, lewdness; prostitution; idolatry" (12c.), from Late Latin fornicationem (nominative fornicatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of fornicari "to fornicate," from Latin fornix (genitive fornicis) "brothel" (Juvenal, Horace), originally "arch, vaulted chamber, a vaulted opening, a covered way," probably an extension, based on appearance, from a source akin to fornus "brick oven of arched or domed shape" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm"). Strictly, "voluntary sex between an unmarried man and an unmarried woman;" extended in the Bible to adultery. The sense extension in Latin is perhaps because Roman prostitutes commonly solicited from under the arches of certain buildings.

*gwher-
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to heat, warm."

It forms all or part of: brand; brandish; brandy; brimstone; brindled; forceps; Fornax; fornicate; fornication; fornix; furnace; hypothermia; thermal; thermo-; Thermopylae; Thermos.
(Online Etymology Dictionary)
Topic: hang paper
Posted: Monday, January 20, 2020 8:27:28 PM
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
This must be "primarily British".

This is a useful piece of information. When there's an equivalent American expression, please post it.

Okay, I checked the Webster dictionary. This is what it says.
paperhanger

1 : one that applies wallpaper
2 slang : one who passes worthless checks
Topic: Word spread like wildfire that Dickson had resigned.
Posted: Monday, January 20, 2020 4:46:38 PM
Thanks, Romany.
Topic: Word spread like wildfire that Dickson had resigned.
Posted: Monday, January 20, 2020 1:49:16 AM
How do native speakers feel about: The word spread like wildfire that Dickson had resigned.

I'm asking this because we us the definite article with "word" in the expression "spread the word".
Topic: few/a few
Posted: Sunday, January 19, 2020 3:24:23 PM
lazarius wrote:
There are three examples in my message. Which is wrong:

few thousands of British Loyalists
a few thousands of British Loyalists
a few thousand British Loyalists

I think, the first two examples are wrong.
Topic: goodness me
Posted: Saturday, January 11, 2020 2:13:19 PM
"Goodness me, could this be industrial disease?"
Topic: recent
Posted: Tuesday, January 7, 2020 2:39:45 PM
It's "gray" in American English but the famous American intercity bus company is Greyhound.
Topic: removal
Posted: Sunday, January 5, 2020 11:34:58 PM
thar wrote:
The Remove - A strange name for a form in the English public school system - among other strange names.

Why on earth would you call a class (form) the Remove?

But, okay, I accept the explanation in the Collins Dictionary.
remove
in British English
noun
7. the act of removing, esp ( formal) a removal of one's residence or place of work
8. the degree of difference separating one person, thing, or condition from another
only one remove from madness
9. British
(in certain schools) a class or form, esp one for children of about 14 years, designed to introduce them to the greater responsibilities of a more senior position in the school
10. (at a formal dinner, formerly) a dish to be changed while the rest of the course remains on the table
Topic: removal
Posted: Sunday, January 5, 2020 9:06:16 PM
Some time ago a poster asked something to the effect: "What should I write in this thread?".

To me, the intention of this forum is to show relationships, or absence of relationships, even if trivial, among words. I like the forum and read it every day. It's pity that practically there are no replies in this forum. The forum could be a place for relaxed, friendly discussion about the English language, even if the topics are trivial.

What I learned today is that "detail" and "tailor" are etymological relatives. It never occurred to me before.
Topic: They departed on their different ways.
Posted: Sunday, January 5, 2020 4:35:10 AM
Reiko07 wrote:
The King = Elvis Presley?

Yes, the "King of Rock and Roll" or simply "the King". (Wikipedia)