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Profile: soliloquy
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User Name: soliloquy
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Joined: Thursday, January 14, 2010
Last Visit: Tuesday, February 8, 2011 12:16:49 PM
Number of Posts: 10
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: can someone correct me that please please!!!
Posted: Saturday, February 5, 2011 4:56:37 PM
Here's my take on it:

A: The Trojan war will not happen, Cassandra!
C: Let us place a bet on it, Andromache.
A: This emissary of the Greeks is right. We shall receive him well. We should neatly wrap up his little Helen, and return her to him.
C: We shall receive him rudely. We shall not give Helen back to him. And the Trojan war will duly take place.
A: Yes, if Hector were not here!...But he is coming, Cassandra, he is coming! You can hear his trumpets already. This very minute, he is entering the city, victorious. I believe he will have a say in this. When he left, three years ago, he swore to me that this war would be the last.
C: It was the last. The next one awaits him.
A: Does it not weary you to see and to foresee only that which is horrifying?
C: I see nothing, Andromache. I foresee nothing. I only take into account two kinds of foolishness, that of Man, and the other, of the elements.
A: Why should the war take place? Paris no longer cares about Helen. Helen no longer cares about Paris.
C: It has to do with them, indeed.
A: It has to do with what?
C: Paris no longer cares about Helen! Helen no longer cares about Paris! Have you ever seen destiny taking an interest in negative sentences?
A: I do not know what destiny is.
C: I shall tell you. It is simply the accelerated version of time. It is appalling.
A: I do not understand abstractions.

J'espere que cela vous soit utile, Sabrina. Biensur, dans quelques cas, la traduction mot pour mot a ete impossible. Le resultat en reste neanmoins plutot fluide, qu'en pensez-vous?
Topic: expensive vs costly
Posted: Saturday, February 5, 2011 3:59:45 PM
Just to add to your confusion, may I also suggest "pricey" as an accepted, albeit rather informal alternative to "expensive". ;)
Topic: expensive vs costly
Posted: Saturday, February 5, 2011 3:50:41 PM
I tend to use "expensive" exclusively when the nature of the object in question possesses a pecuniary value.

"Costly" needs not be pejorative, although it is often intended as such. This adjective alludes to a "cost" to someone, though not necessarily in terms of money.
For instance, smoking may be costly to someone; not in terms of money spent to buy cigarettes (here I'd use "expensive") but rather due to the detrimental effects (cost) on one's health.
Topic: 'hair of the dog that bit someone'
Posted: Saturday, February 5, 2011 3:30:29 PM
jcbarros wrote:
This sounds homeopathy to me.Eh?


You beat me to it! Ye olde saying hath clear connotations with modern homeopathy. The efficiency of both is similarly questionable, too.
Topic: 'wear out one's welcome'
Posted: Saturday, February 5, 2011 1:33:31 PM
Jenandew wrote:
soliloquy wrote:
In British English, one would simply say: "To overstay one's (the guest) welcome" or "To abuse one's (the host) hospitality."
In both cases, it means that the guest is staying long enough to the point of becoming undesirable to the host.

When not referring to anyone in particular, "one" is not out of usage here. Especially not in written British English. I admit it may sound somewhat odd if used in a casual conversation, though.


I actually prefer the use of "one" and think it is ridiculous that Americans don't use it (much) anymore. It's very useful and I often do.


Hi Jenandew,
I hope my post didn't come across as ever so slightly offensive to American English speakers. I actually have enormous respect for American English. Both our countries contribute to keep the language alive and flourishing in our own distinct ways.
I do agree with you, "one" comes in handy in many a situation; such as to avoid petty but annoying confusions when it is replaced with "you" when one's interlocutor is not necessarily being targeted.
Topic: 'wear out one's welcome'
Posted: Thursday, February 3, 2011 5:05:11 AM
In British English, one would simply say: "To overstay one's (the guest) welcome" or "To abuse one's (the host) hospitality."
In both cases, it means that the guest is staying long enough to the point of becoming undesirable to the host.

When not referring to anyone in particular, "one" is not out of usage here. Especially not in written British English. I admit it may sound somewhat odd if used in a casual conversation, though.
Topic: Le wok
Posted: Friday, January 15, 2010 1:06:20 AM
Bonjour Sandra,
C'est moi qui vous remercie de rendre ces forums si interessants :0)
Je compte bien y apporter ma modeste connaissance de cette belle langue qu'est le francais, et surtout d'en apprendre davantage. La realisation m'a recemment frappe de plein fouet que mon francais s'est errode au fil des annees.
A bientot!
Topic: What's in your name?
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2010 7:09:02 AM
Rodney - Old German and Old English, meaning Roda's Island/Land by the clearing.
Jonathan - Hebrew. Gift of God.
Noël - French for Christmas, for I was born at that time of the year.
Topic: corriger de quelques mots français
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2010 6:03:34 AM
anne wrote:
Bonsoir,

Je voudrais savoir si les mots suivantes sont justes :

les crêpes ( ce que l'on peut manger )

les tours de bicyclette

les tours de bateaux

les tasses (où on peut mettre plusieurs choses dedans , qui les femmes surtout portent ).

Mille remerciements d'avance

ANNE



Bonjour Anne,

Puis-je me permettre d'ajouter que l'on dirait plus volontiers "les tours a(accent grave) bicyclette" et "les tours en bateaux"
"Handbags" sont en effet des sacs a main.

Rodney
Topic: Le wok
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2010 5:42:34 AM
Bonjour Patrick,
pour repondre a ta question initiale, je partage le meme avis que SandraM; on dit simplement "cuisiner au wok" car il ne semble pas y avoir de verbe specifique attribue a ce mot importe.

Quant aux restaurants qui proposent que des mets prepares dans cette sauteuse, il est improbable qu'ils arborent en France une enseigne avec les mots "restaurant" et "wok" dessus.
Cependant, je comprends la pertinence de ta question, car en anglais par exemple, qui est selon moi une langue plus flexible que le francais, "Wok Restaurant" pourrait tres bien se dire sans offusquer les puristes, et il en existe peut-etre deja dans les pays anglo-saxons.

Par ailleurs, pardonnez-moi mes mots non-accentues. Ma seule defense, j'utilise un clavier anglo-saxon.

Rodney

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