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User Name: kitten
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Joined: Monday, December 28, 2009
Last Visit: Friday, June 08, 2012 3:03:36 PM
Number of Posts: 2,468
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Many Underestimate Marijuana Health Risks
Posted: Friday, June 08, 2012 3:03:16 PM
Daemon wrote:
Many Underestimate Marijuana Health Risks

A third of respondents in a new British survey said they believe smoking marijuana is harmless. The survey of 1,000 adults also found that nearly 90 percent think that smoking tobacco cigarettes is more harmful than smoking marijuana cigarettes, despite the fact that the lung cancer risk is 20 times higher for smoking marijuana. Researchers said that the increased risk may be due to the fact that marijuana smokers inhale more deeply and for longer amounts of time than tobacco smokers. Experts said the data suggest that more needs to be done to educate people about the health effects of smoking marijuana. More...



Please work to understand this poorly written law and then work to change it.

Thank you.


kitten >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: American Masters Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:29:57 PM
Christine, thank you so much for bringing to everyone's attention.Dancing


What I found so sad about her story is she wanted her husband to destroy the original manuscript of, Gone With The Wind, after she died. He did start to burn the work but decided to keep some of it so that people would know that she truly wrote the book. I have several copies of this book and am again reading it yet again. I bartered my Fiat for an original first editionShhh worth every penny.

I tell my cat, who sleeps with me, just what Miss Scarlett has done!Anxious


>^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: Of ambitions, it is less harmful, the ambition to prevail in great things, than that other, to appear in every thing; for...
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2012 5:32:01 PM
Daemon wrote:
Of ambitions, it is less harmful, the ambition to prevail in great things, than that other, to appear in every thing; for that breeds confusion, and mars business.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)



In context the quote makes more sense, at least to me.Anxious


AMBITION is like choler; which is an humor that maketh men active, earnest, full of alacrity, and stirring, if it be not stopped. But if it be stopped, and cannot have his way, it becometh adust, and thereby malign and venomous. So ambitious men, if they find the way open for their rising, and still get forward, they are rather busy than dangerous; but if they be checked in their desires, they become secretly discontent, and look upon men and matters with an evil eye, and are best pleased, when things go backward; which is the worst property in a servant of a prince, or state. Therefore it is good for princes, if they use ambitious men, to handle it, so as they be still progressive and not retrograde; which, because it cannot be without inconvenience, it is good not to use such natures at all. For if they rise not with their service, they will take order, to make their service fall with them. But since we have said, it were good not to use men of ambitious natures, except it be upon necessity, it is fit we speak, in what cases they are of necessity. Good commanders in the wars must be taken, be they never so ambitious; for the use of their service, dispenseth with the rest; and to take a soldier without ambition, is to pull off his spurs. There is also great use of ambitious men, in being screens to princes in matters of danger and envy; for no man will take that part, except he be like a seeled dove, that mounts and mounts, because he cannot see about him. There is use also of ambitious men, in pulling down the greatness of any subject that overtops; as Tiberius used Marco, in the pulling down of Sejanus. Since, therefore, they must be used in such cases, there resteth to speak, how they are to be bridled, that they may be less dangerous. There is less danger of them, if they be of mean birth, than if they be noble; and if they be rather harsh of nature, than gracious and popular: and if they be rather new raised, than grown cunning, and fortified, in their greatness. It is counted by some, a weakness in princes, to have favorites; but it is, of all others, the best remedy against ambitious great-ones. For when the way of pleasuring, and displeasuring, lieth by the favorite, it is impossible any other should be overgreat. Another means to curb them, is to balance them by others, as proud as they. But then there must be some middle counsellors, to keep things steady; for without that ballast, the ship will roll too much. At the least, a prince may animate and inure some meaner persons, to be as it were scourges, to ambitions men. As for the having of them obnoxious to ruin; if they be of fearful natures, it may do well; but if they be stout and daring, it may precipitate their designs, and prove dangerous. As for the pulling of them down, if the affairs require it, and that it may not be done with safety suddenly, the only way is the interchange, continually, of favors and disgraces; whereby they may not know what to expect, and be, as it were, in a wood. Of ambitions, it is less harmful, the ambition to prevail in great things, than that other, to appear in every thing; for that breeds confusion, and mars business. But yet it is less danger, to have an ambitious man stirring in business, than great in dependences. He that seeketh to be eminent amongst able men, hath a great task; but that is ever good for the public. But he, that plots to be the only figure amongst ciphers, is the decay of a whole age. Honor hath three things in it: the vantage ground to do good; the approach to kings and principal persons; and the raising of a man’s own fortunes. He that hath the best of these intentions, when he aspireth, is an honest man; and that prince, that can discern of these intentions in another that aspireth, is a wise prince. Generally, let princes and states choose such ministers, as are more sensible of duty than of using; and such as love business rather upon conscience, than upon bravery, and let them discern a busy nature, from a willing mind.


Please thank www.authorama.com for the quote in context.


peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: Although men are accused for not knowing their own weakness, yet perhaps as few know their own strength. It is in men as in...
Posted: Monday, January 23, 2012 8:54:56 PM
Daemon wrote:
Although men are accused for not knowing their own weakness, yet perhaps as few know their own strength. It is in men as in soils, where sometimes there is a vein of gold, which the owner knows not of.

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)



This quote can apply to either sex........he is merely suggesting that we have strengths within us and we need to dig a little deeper to find them.


peace out. >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase,...
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 7:34:38 PM
Daemon wrote:
When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)



The above quote is from, Of, Human Bondage. I think in context it makes a little sense. I don't know the chapter as i still don't have my lappy.Silenced And the library is a hoot and a half.Shhh Whistle


“When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has meaning for me, and it becomes part of me; I’ve got out of the book all that’s any use to me, and I can’t get anything more if I read it a dozen times. You see, it seems to me, one’s like a closed bud, and most of what one reads and does has no effect at all; but there are certain things that have a peculiar significance for one, and they open a petal; and the petals open one by one; and at last the flower is there.” ― W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage


Please thank www.goodreads.com for the quote in context.


peace out, >^,,^<


d'oh! d'oh! Boo hoo! Boo hoo! Sorry for the double post, the library is slow at times.Anxious


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase,...
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 7:32:32 PM
Daemon wrote:
When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)



The above quote is from, Of, Human Bondage. I think in context it makes a little sense. I don't know the chapter as i still don't have my lappy.Silenced And the library is a hoot and a half.Shhh Whistle


“When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has meaning for me, and it becomes part of me; I’ve got out of the book all that’s any use to me, and I can’t get anything more if I read it a dozen times. You see, it seems to me, one’s like a closed bud, and most of what one reads and does has no effect at all; but there are certain things that have a peculiar significance for one, and they open a petal; and the petals open one by one; and at last the flower is there.” ― W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage


Please thank www.goodreads.com for the quote in context.


peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: Richard Milhous Nixon (1913)
Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4:55:56 PM
Richard Nixon walked a gray area and at times didn't care who he threw under the bus including the laws of the land. For an attorney he was indeed corrupt.

He may have opened the door to China, but where did it really get us? Trades that are unfair, businesses that moved overseas to make more money for the corporations, lack of jobs here and the break up of our country.

I shall say as a native Californian, I for one, am not proud to include him as one of our favourite sons. The latest tapes and info released about him shows him to be narrow of mind and greatly intolerant of those different than himself, especially those of colour.

He was a waste of a president, but this is just my opinion.


peace out. >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: A homemade Christmas card to all
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 6:51:36 PM
[color=darkred]What a beautiful card. I am not that talented.

As my lappy is away for two weeks to be fixed Brick wall I shall only be on once on a while.





The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: US Declares War in Iraq Officially Over
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 6:22:23 PM
excaelis wrote:
I'm not convinced it's over for the poor Iraqis, any more than it is for the families of those killed or traumatised there. I'm bloody sick of old men in suits sending other people's children out to die in vainglorious money-driven conflicts. There's no such thing as a winnable war. Good thoughts and lots of light to all who suffer.



Double Amen--Old men in suits need to go out and fight these wars.Shhh Silenced Whistle

Watched a programme on the "Christmas Day Peace" that took place in 1914 in 'no man's land,' those who were in the upper command did not, repeat, did not want the British and German soldiers singing Christmas Carols together. It was on the History Channel and will be repeated. Amazing what those "old men" decided to do.d'oh!


peace out. >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
Topic: Gone with the Wind Premiers in Atlanta, Georgia (1939)
Posted: Thursday, December 15, 2011 7:10:34 PM
This is my favourite book. I do own an original copy, traded my Fiat for it, I got the better of the deal.Anxious

The story doesn't follow the book. She actually has two other children by the time she had Bonnie with Rhett.

peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton

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