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Profile: sandraleesmith46
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User Name: sandraleesmith46
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Female
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Joined: Friday, November 20, 2009
Last Visit: Monday, September 12, 2011 6:15:09 PM
Number of Posts: 696
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: stupefy
Posted: Tuesday, August 30, 2011 2:40:23 AM
DaniH wrote:
Expelliarmus!
Whistle


Stupefy also applies to a character from an old comic strip in the newspapers called "L'il Abner" and the character was a buxom and leggy female known as "Stupefyin' Jones" due to her effect on the male population of the fictional Dogpatch, where the strip was set; the men and boys of Dogpatch would stop dead, staring, in a daze whenever "Stupefyin' Jones came around them.

I think you may have seen/read too much "Harry Potter".

fair winds and following seas
Topic: take a shine to somebody (something)
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 7:53:41 AM
Okay, I don't have Irene to contend with, and as a native, I would sa you've hit the nail on the head.

fair winds and following seas
Topic: Help: translation for a slogan
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 7:48:25 AM
Maybe "the education that stirs the Chinese spirit"?

fair winds and following seas
Topic: ENGLISH NAME
Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 4:17:30 AM
Nish wrote:
Hi TFD friends!


What's the most beautiful English name for you? <For the male and female please>


Our friends here who's about to deliver a baby might get some great ideas from you guys^-^


Thanks a lot!


Regards,

I see most have offered some specific names. I have a different suggestion; all names have MEANINGS, and perhaps your friends should find a book with the meanings of various names, and think carefully before they slap some horrendous label on their child to follow him or her through life, because it sounds nice to the ear or looks impressive on paper. Also suggest they steer clear of names that are too unusual or trendy; remember that kid has to go to school with that name, and carry it all through life as well. What's cute on a baby isn't always so cute on a 70 year old.

fair winds and following seas
Topic: answering to e-mails
Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 4:06:11 AM
Answering an e-mail would be the correct English usage. A good way to start thinking in English is to read books in English or speak with other English users; posting here regularly will also help. Thinking in the other language does help and work.

fair winds and following seas
Topic: Spider Silk Used to Make Bulletproof Skin
Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 4:00:05 AM
I KNEW that stuff was tough, but I'm not sure such experimentation is wise. Being a natural substance and a protein, the potential for fatal allergic reactions could be quite high.

fair winds and following seas
Topic: Social Media Use Linked to Teen Drinking, Drug Use
Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 3:57:25 AM
thar wrote:
Or, how about, people leading interesting lives have less reason to hang around doing nothing but drinking, smoking and sat at the computer on social networking sites!


Not necessarily. Back in the '70s there was a ban on showing people smoking on TV programming and in the movies made in the US, and there was a drop in the numbers of teens picking up the habit; I was really sorry when that ban was lifted and they started showing people doing so again,and naturally the levels increased again. It does have an impact, at an almost subliminal level on how people, especially young people perceive a particular thing.

fair winds and following seas
Topic: hi
Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 3:43:13 AM
Aid-e wrote:
juben1, thank you!! Point 2 won't be easy, at least for me but I'll try all your suggestions every day, that's why I'm here in TFD, point 4: I heard that before, I better find the way to start, it is hard. Regards.


English is my native language, and admittedly it is difficult to learn; you'd be surprised how many natives in America still can't speak or write it properly. However, while I was in high school, I studied French, and my French teacher said the same thing about learning to think in French; it does work. So does reading in the language you wish to learn; and both Amazon and Barnes and Noble have e-reader apps for PC you can download for free, and lots of free books you can then download into them to read. Just go to amazon.com and click on Kindle, the follow the instructions to download the free Kindle app for your PC, and search the book list for free books then choose those you want to read. When you choose a book, click on the buy now bar to the right, it doesn't mean there's a charge. It takes about 5 minutes and it shows up in your Kindle library, when you open the app, and then download and read. I haven't quite figured the B&N Nook out as well yet, but I know the Kindle app works easily. Hope this helps you get started.


fair winds and following seas
Topic: Are these sentences natural? August 19
Posted: Sunday, August 21, 2011 7:20:09 AM
musicgold wrote:
Hi,

Are the following sentences natural to a native ear?

1. The only problem with calling them is that they might not be up as yet.

2. Up to how many tables do you know? ( I was asking a kid, how many multiplication tables does she now)

3. If you had asked me, I would have told you where it is / was.


Thanks,
MG.

Did you want British, American, Canadian, or Australian English? They differ on the finer points. Being American, most here would drop the as or maybe say " just yet" depending on whether they're older than 50 or not; teaching of the English language in our schools changed appreciably about 45 or so years ago.

Here, most call the multiplication tables the "times" tables, and children would most likely look quite quizzically at you, if you used the proper term. They're so called because it's one number times another that is the process. So you might ask how many of the times tables a child knows.

The third is fairly colloquial in most English speaking nations now.

fair winds and following seas
Topic: What's the meaning of this sentence?
Posted: Sunday, August 21, 2011 7:06:45 AM
nihaoivyliu wrote:
What's the meaning of the underlined sentence?What's the meaning of Oregon center"?Is it a university?As a foreigner,the complex of culture give me more troubles .So I am waiting for your help.Thanks.
_________________________________________________

Levy recounts a conversation between Page and an engineer, who explained that the scoring system would rank a page higher if “university” appeared multiple times in the headline. AltaVista seemed untroubled that the Oregon center did not qualify as a major university. . A conventional way to rank universities would be to consult experts and assess measures of quality: graduate rates, retention rates, test scores. The Google approach was to trust the Web and its numerous links, for better and for worse.

Jyrrka mentioned that AltaVista is a search engine associated with Yahoo; it's also a fairly good sized city in the state of California, in the "silicon valley" area, where much of computer tech in the '80s and '90s was conceived and developed.
I noticed you said you "catched" the meaning of the sentence; the correct past tense of catch is caught, since you're wishing to learn the language, I presume, in the correct manner.

fair winds and following seas

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