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Profile: fruitjam
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User Name: fruitjam
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Service.
Interests: Reading, watching the telly, playing FIFA.
Gender: Male
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Joined: Thursday, October 29, 2009
Last Visit: Tuesday, March 18, 2014 4:57:57 AM
Number of Posts: 92
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: the behavior of "biting finger"
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 6:50:33 AM
Onychophagia.



Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Word to describe absence of a word required to be present.
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 5:08:08 AM
peaty wrote:
You could describe the absence of the word as a "lacuna".


A gap could described as a lacuna.

But I was not looking to describe a gap. I was searching for a word which would describe the absence of a word when it is needed in a given context. The word "elliptical" is the word; for it accurately conveys the meaning of being extremely condensed or concise, marked by frugality to the point of being obscure altogether.

Another set of words which may be worth mentioning here is "mot juste".

It means: appropriate word or expression.



Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Looking into the issue.
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 3:25:09 AM
early_apex wrote:
fruitjam wrote:
The part of the world I work for a living has a bond with the phrase "look into the issue". Almost any official email - either seeking assistance, or passing an advice or instruction - ends with: "Please look into the issue." Which is fine by me, since it serves the purpose intended; but sounds banal.

Is there something else that I can use in place of that effectively and more fresher sounding?


Yes, it is banal, and furthermore, there is no measurable output. If you call the person back three weeks later, they can always say, "Yes, I am looking into it." If you want the person to take a specific action, it is best to say so, and ask for a completion date.

Unless, of course, you just want to add to someone's work load with no expectations of completing a task. Then you might conclude with a query like, "Tell me what you think should be done about this?"

---Just some thoughts.


More often than not, there is no measurable output. But the impact of the action is significant enough to warrant a request to examine the problem at hand as in "Please look into the issue."

Many often resort to using: "please revert with your feedback" - which I find erroneous in construction. "Revert" means to go back / return to the previous state.

"Please revert with your feedback" - would, then, imply switching to the state before any action had been taken to resolve the issue at hand; giving feedback in the process. Perhaps, stating "please come back with your feedback" could be deemed as appropriate.

But, that still leaves me with a nagging suspicion that this, too, is not what I am searching in order to replace "look into the issue."





Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Looking into the issue.
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 3:12:54 AM
TL Hobs wrote:


Or, to make a point, you might conclude with.....

"Have your smart phone text my smart phone, and I'll get back to you for lunch."

Think


In a more relaxed environment, this could be well accepted. Not in my case though.

Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Looking into the issue.
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 3:11:08 AM
towan52 wrote:
fruitjam wrote:
The part of the world I work for a living has a bond with the phrase "look into the issue". Almost any official email - either seeking assistance, or passing an advice or instruction - ends with: "Please look into the issue." Which is fine by me, since it serves the purpose intended; but sounds banal.

Is there something else that I can use in place of that effectively and more fresher sounding?



Hi Fj: nice to know that corporate "crap-speak" is alive and well internationally. In a light-hearted spirit, you could ask the recipient to "run it up the flagpole and see if it flies, moving forward" or "let's get the oars out on this and see if it floats" Or, more sensibly, "let me know what you think, I'd appreciate your input".


I am sorely tempted to use the suggested phrases. Alas, those would not be well received.

Seeking an input or a feedback - in most cases, would not be appropriate as the recipient might choose to work on the issue and report the results on a different channel altogether.

Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Looking into the issue.
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 2:46:49 AM
Yakcal wrote:

With correspondence such as this I like to end the letter with: I thank you, in advance, for your assistance in this matter.

This phrase takes the assumption that the reader will be of assistance and that you are thankful, in advance, for his/her assistance in whatever the problem.



Thank you. This is near perfect. It might also give an impression that I may not be bothered to send a note of thanks after receiving the assistance.

In certain situations, especially where inter- or intra-departmental communication is involved, this may not be appropriate as the intended recipient of the assistance could be someone else.



Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Looking into the issue.
Posted: Thursday, March 7, 2013 8:42:44 AM
The part of the world I work for a living has a bond with the phrase "look into the issue". Almost any official email - either seeking assistance, or passing an advice or instruction - ends with: "Please look into the issue." Which is fine by me, since it serves the purpose intended; but sounds banal.

Is there something else that I can use in place of that effectively and more fresher sounding?



Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Word to describe absence of a word required to be present.
Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 8:37:32 AM
leonAzul wrote:
fruitjam wrote:
leonAzul wrote:
fruitjam wrote:
leonAzul wrote:
Please be succinct.
Whistle



Not quite the word appropriate in the context that I am looking to apply it in.


Perhaps "taciturn" or "parsimonious" are more to your liking.

I prefer to be terse.
Whistle


Quite; in terms of being opposite "gratuitous", the two words are a fit.

But then I am searching for a word which would describe the very absence of a word when it is actually needed to be used in a given context.

elliptical


Need I tell you that you have a way with words?

Perfect. Just what I needed.

Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Word to describe absence of a word required to be present.
Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 8:08:08 AM
leonAzul wrote:
fruitjam wrote:
leonAzul wrote:
Please be succinct.
Whistle



Not quite the word appropriate in the context that I am looking to apply it in.


Perhaps "taciturn" or "parsimonious" are more to your liking.

I prefer to be terse.
Whistle


Quite; in terms of being opposite "gratuitous", the two words are a fit.

But then I am searching for a word which would describe the very absence of a word when it is actually needed to be used in a given context.





Respectfully yours,
Fj
Topic: Word to describe absence of a word required to be present.
Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 7:50:12 AM
leonAzul wrote:
Please be succinct.
Whistle



Not quite the word appropriate in the context that I am looking to apply it in.



Respectfully yours,
Fj

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