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Profile: James P
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User Name: James P
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Last Visit: Friday, October 12, 2012 3:17:08 PM
Number of Posts: 31
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: patent liver-pill circular
Posted: Sunday, July 22, 2012 7:57:45 PM
FounDit wrote:
James P,

You are correct about "patent". I had a prickling thought about that even after I wrote it, but it was late and I was about to retire. I should have followed up on my doubt. I automatically went with the modern definition.

Thanks.

I'm glad that you understand. I would hate for my correction to seem like criticism. I am guilty of late night postings on forums, almost always with undesirable results.
Topic: patent liver-pill circular
Posted: Sunday, July 22, 2012 1:44:31 AM
FounDit, I'm very sorry to disagree with, but I'm afraid that in this case I must. The adjective "patent" is very misleading when it's used with the word "medicine". "Patent medicine" was a whole class of near worthless products that where heavily promoted as cures in an earlier age. While the items may or may not have been trademarked, there was no patent process involved at all. To be patented, a product would have to do something new and most of these products didn't do anything at all. These products were often sold by traveling salesmen and were the very heart of Medicine Shows. Jerome K Jerome (1859-1927)lived at the height of this era.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patent_medicine

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine_show

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerome_K._Jerome

Does anyone remember Carter's Little Liver Pills?
Topic: The President today, he said...
Posted: Friday, July 13, 2012 4:47:07 PM
Thank you all for expressing your views on this. I've come to realize that it has probably gotten under my skin because of this one young reporter in particular. She will use this misbegotten "devise" more than once in a breif report. Perhaps it's a bit of an affectation or maybe some silly little bad habit of speech. Bolstered by your thoughts on the subject, I will shortly write a letter to the indiviual in question stating my stern disapproval. In it I will assert that I have the support outraged grammarians from various points around the globe. That'll make her change her ways! Applause
Topic: The President today, he said...
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2012 4:20:26 PM
James P wrote:
I'm listening to the noontime news as I write this. In the last few minutes I've heard two different sentences that started in this manor: "The President today, he said...". I hear that sort of use of noun and pronoun frequently these days and it always makes me wince. I'm a little embarrassed to ask this because it's been decades since I was schooled in grammar, but is this sort of duplication of the subject now acceptable? Has it always been and I'm just bothered by it now?


Geez, anybody notice that I used the wrong "manor" (manner)? I think that I just lost the right to complain about anything.
Topic: The President today, he said...
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2012 12:47:14 PM
I'm listening to the noontime news as I write this. In the last few minutes I've heard two different sentences that started in this manor: "The President today, he said...". I hear that sort of use of noun and pronoun frequently these days and it always makes me wince. I'm a little embarrassed to ask this because it's been decades since I was schooled in grammar, but is this sort of duplication of the subject now acceptable? Has it always been and I'm just bothered by it now?
Topic: good bye synonyms
Posted: Sunday, June 17, 2012 10:54:19 PM
Earlier I quoted a song by Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. Now I'll quote one by Bill Haley and His Comets.

"See you later, aligator!"
"After while, crocodile!"
Topic: good bye synonyms
Posted: Sunday, June 17, 2012 1:01:20 AM
I can almost here Roy Rogers and Dale Evans singing as I type this: "Till We Meet Again!"
Topic: Is this a new trend on American Grammar?
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2012 3:13:58 PM
DragOnspeaker, I wonder if I might ask where that beautiful winter picture was taken? It looks like an everyday winter scene here in Minnesota. I do so love the snow. I think that it's beauty is calming and soothing, at least as long as you don't have to drive through it in a hurry. I also think that it enhances silence and pleasant, noble feelings of solitude. I know that it's downright laughable that I'm sitting here on a beautiful summer day gazing at a picture of a winter scene with longing. Do those of you who don't regularly receive snow get any sense from this picture of how it can touch the spirit?
Topic: Is this a new trend on American Grammar?
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2012 1:19:30 AM
Briton, I'm amused all the more that somewhere "plead" (rhymes with bed) is in common use. The use of "pleaded" is a small point that I have long paid attention to, because I've assumed that one day, as the language evolves, the word would simply disappear. At least it hasn't here in the center of the U S.
Topic: Is this a new trend on American Grammar?
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2012 4:06:18 PM
I have to laugh a little about this, but there is one verb that I've been anticipating a change in for a long time. Virtually every newscast has some story in which a suspect "pleads" guilty (or not guilty, as the case may be) to a legal charge. The newscasters, none of whom have superior grammar standards to begin with, still after all of these years, manage to correctly say that the suspect "pleaded" one way or the other to the charge. Perhaps the correct use of the word "pleaded" is something that was stressed heavily during training, but I'm fairly certain that someone will one day say "pled"(like bled, wed, etc), and that will be the loss of one word and the birth of a new one.

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