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Profile: Kristina Lukosevice
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User Name: Kristina Lukosevice
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Wednesday, June 5, 2019
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 11:06:06 AM
Number of Posts: 13
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Topic: Grant her that
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 11:06:06 AM
WeaselADAPT, NancyUK - now I understand, thank you very much!
Topic: Grant her that
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 10:16:03 AM
Dear All,

how do you understand this phrase in the following context:

" "Good morning, Miss Worthington," Miss St. Claire called as I made my way to the sideboard. 'I hope you slept well."
"Yes, I slept well, thank you." I had to bite back other, less polite words, about how I was Henry's guest, not hers, and that she has not supposed to be here on my first and only visit to Blackmoore. I bit back the uncharitable words that rose to my tongue and struggled to think something kind about this interloper, this young woman who had come here to rob me of the visit I was supposed to have. I thought hard while I piled food on my plate and by the time I turned to the table and the empty seat across the two of them, I had thought of one thing: Miss St. Claire was a thoughtful interloper. I could grant her that. "

J. Donaldson "Blackmoore"

She is sure, that Miss St.Claire is an interloper, or maybe she gave her a "nickname":)? Any other suggestions?

Thank you in advance!

Topic: Barnacled
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 5:00:11 AM
thar wrote:
barnacled is the adjective related to barnacles

this is 'despair' punching him so it is metaphorical anyway, but it gives the image that the fists were tough as rock, hard, sharp and calloused by repeated use. And getting punched by them really hurt!



Perfect, thank you sooo much!
Topic: Barnacled
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2019 2:14:34 AM
Hi All,

how do you understand the word "barnacled" in this context?

"Despair beat at me with barnacled fists."
J. Donaldson Blackmoore

Thanks for any suggestions!
Topic: Only you’d tell if it were that big
Posted: Wednesday, July 3, 2019 9:23:27 AM
NancyUK wrote:
Hi Kristina Lukosevice

Excerpt:
He eyed her. “I think we will take it all and then leave enough evidence that points to you. How about that? Only you’d tell if it were that big, wouldn’t you? Which leaves me with an interesting dilemma.”

My understanding of this is as follows:

They are going to steal everything
He is going to leave clues to incriminate her
But now he's worried that if the crime is so big (stealing everything), she'll tell someone
So he's thinking he may have to kill her, to keep her quiet. - My guess.


Hi,
thank you!
The same thought has occurred to me... Especially as:

"Callie didn’t know what made a person cross the line from stealing to something more violent and she really didn’t want to find out. She was pretty sure Paulo wouldn’t hurt her, but she was less confident about his friend."
Topic: Only you’d tell if it were that big
Posted: Wednesday, July 3, 2019 7:39:36 AM
Dear All,

I would be so grateful for any thoughts about this expression.

Context is as follows: Paulo blackmailed his coworker Callie to help him in committing a theft. Now he tells her about his intentions to set her up. However, I have no idea what he means by saying Only you’d tell if it were that big, wouldn’t you? ?

Excerpt:
He eyed her. “I think we will take it all and then leave enough evidence that points to you. How about that? Only you’d tell if it were that big, wouldn’t you? Which leaves me with an interesting dilemma.”


Thank you a lot for any cue!

Topic: happily married single mom
Posted: Monday, July 1, 2019 4:32:22 AM
thar wrote:
So you should get co-authorship credit for your translation! Whistle

Did she suggest a fix? Or just leave it in as true to the original. Because this sounds like a plot point, not just an error that can be edited out.


Yes, she suggested to delete that part about "happy marriage" :) Now it sounds like this:


Frankie nudged Callie. “You said you’re single, right? Maybe you’ll catch one of their eyes. They’re handsome men.”
Topic: happily married single mom
Posted: Monday, July 1, 2019 4:13:39 AM
Hi again,

finally, I wrote to writer herself. Facebook's a great thing! :) She confirmed it as mistake.
I know these books are far from Shakespeare, anyway, many people like them... So I try to do my best and translate them properly. (However this book is full of mismatches d'oh! )

Thank you all for trying to help!
Topic: happily married single mom
Posted: Friday, June 14, 2019 1:17:48 AM
FounDit wrote:
Kristina Lukosevice wrote:
thar wrote:
Who are they referring to in the second excerpt?

"Frankie nudged Callie. “You said you’re single, right? Maybe you’ll catch one of their eyes. I’m happily married and even I can see they’re handsome men.” "

Frankie is saying "I am married".



"Callie’s expression didn’t soften at all. “She’s a single mom"

Callie is saying "she is single".
But who is Callie referring to?
There is nothing here to say she is referring to Frankie.




Callie is talking about Frankie :) "Callie cleared her throat. “First, there’s a woman I work with. Frankie. Her son, Levi, has cancer. It’s been really hard on her"


Callie says there is a woman she works with, then she mentions Frankie. But is Frankie the woman she is referring to when she says "She's a single mom"? It isn't clear here that this is the case. Who is Callie talking to when she says that, and who is she talking about?


Well, the story is from S. Mallery When we found home. I am not able to insert a link as it seems something wrong with this page. Callie is talking to their manager, about single mom Frankie,(who earlier nudged her and declared she's happily married). I just wanted to understand if it is possible to be happily married and single in one time :)
Topic: happily married single mom
Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2019 2:09:31 PM
thar wrote:
Who are they referring to in the second excerpt?

"Frankie nudged Callie. “You said you’re single, right? Maybe you’ll catch one of their eyes. I’m happily married and even I can see they’re handsome men.” "

Frankie is saying "I am married".



"Callie’s expression didn’t soften at all. “She’s a single mom"

Callie is saying "she is single".
But who is Callie referring to?
There is nothing here to say she is referring to Frankie.




Callie is talking about Frankie :) "Callie cleared her throat. “First, there’s a woman I work with. Frankie. Her son, Levi, has cancer. It’s been really hard on her"

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