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Profile: Kristina Lukosevice
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User Name: Kristina Lukosevice
Forum Rank: Newbie
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Wednesday, June 5, 2019
Last Visit: Thursday, February 6, 2020 2:24:02 AM
Number of Posts: 21
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: rub the contents of the vacuum bag into crevices
Posted: Thursday, February 6, 2020 2:24:02 AM
thar wrote:
No, that is it.

It is not about repair, it is about making it look old by faking it having a few hundred years of dust accumulated in its crevices.


Thanks a lot! You're great help, as always! Applause Applause
Topic: rub the contents of the vacuum bag into crevices
Posted: Tuesday, February 4, 2020 3:32:26 AM
Dear All,

I have a sentence saying: "But over time Maxine taught Cady how to do some basic repairs on antiques and how to make new things look old with crackle paint and sandpaper, using the contents of the vacuum bag to rub into crevices and voids."

I got confused a little bit. Do I understand right: contents of vacuum bag = dust..etc? Does somebody really use such trick, in renovation of some old things by filling cracks with pressed dust? I've found some advice about filling cracks with epoxy and instant coffee, so may be its true...

Or this phrase has absolute different meaning?

Thank you!
Topic: "Should never marry anyone who'd have us"
Posted: Thursday, December 19, 2019 3:06:34 AM
thar wrote:
have = accept

ie if someone wants to/ is willing to marry you, there must be something wrong with them. Therefore you shouldn't marry them.



There is a famous quote from the comedian Groucho Marx
“I wouldn't want to belong to a club that would have me as a member”





Oh well, it would never have occurred to meSilenced Now I understand :) Thank you!
Topic: "Should never marry anyone who'd have us"
Posted: Thursday, December 19, 2019 2:42:54 AM
Dear All,

absolutely confused d'oh! about this saying. Would be so grateful for any thoughts.

Context:

Alex had been unexpectedly generous with tools,supplies, and advice. In fact, he had started dropping by
at least once a week, possibly because renovation and construction were his area of experience and his help
was so obviously needed.

“What do you think he wants?” Sam had asked Mark.

“For his niece not to be flattened by a collapsing house?”

“No, that would be attributing human motivations to him, and we agreed never to do that.

Mark tried, without success, to hold back a grin.
Alex was so cool and emotionally distant that on occasion you had to question the existence of a pulse.

“Maybe’s he’s using any excuse to spend time away from Darcy. If I didn’t already hate the idea of marriage
so much, I sure would think twice about it after seeing Alex’s.”

“Obviously,” Mark said, “a Nolan should never marry anyone who’s too much like us.”

“I think a Nolan should never marry anyone who’d have us."

(L. Kleypas. Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor)
Topic: Entertain
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 11:43:36 AM
NancyUK, thank you very very much! Angel
Topic: Entertain
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 8:19:45 AM
Dear All, could you please help to understand the word "entertain" in this context?

I am not sure if it is meant that wife's duties are to entertain husband, or (as I find another meaning) to organize some receptions, o maybe entertain guests of her husband? Thanks a lot!

"They’d lived there happily for nearly nine years, raising two bright,

attractive children, hosting dinner parties, cocktail parties, garden

parties. Eliza’s job, as wife of the chief of surgery of Mercy Hospital

in nearby Asheville, was to look beautiful and stylish, to raise the

children well, keep the house, entertain, and head committees."
(N. Roberts Under Currents)
Topic: casual grace could not be taught only learned
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 5:11:24 AM
Thank you all for great help!
Topic: casual grace could not be taught only learned
Posted: Thursday, October 17, 2019 3:35:44 AM

Dear All,

need your help for understanding this sentence "casual grace could not be taught only learned".

"Henry sat at the head of the table with Miss St.Claire at his right hand. He occupied that seat of authority with a casual grace that could not be taught, only learned."

Is this something like a behaviour, which you can not learn by heart, just have to gain with years passing, or maybe, it is like some blessing?


Thank you very much!

Topic: Grant her that
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 11:06:06 AM
WeaselADAPT, NancyUK - now I understand, thank you very much!
Topic: Grant her that
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 10:16:03 AM
Dear All,

how do you understand this phrase in the following context:

" "Good morning, Miss Worthington," Miss St. Claire called as I made my way to the sideboard. 'I hope you slept well."
"Yes, I slept well, thank you." I had to bite back other, less polite words, about how I was Henry's guest, not hers, and that she has not supposed to be here on my first and only visit to Blackmoore. I bit back the uncharitable words that rose to my tongue and struggled to think something kind about this interloper, this young woman who had come here to rob me of the visit I was supposed to have. I thought hard while I piled food on my plate and by the time I turned to the table and the empty seat across the two of them, I had thought of one thing: Miss St. Claire was a thoughtful interloper. I could grant her that. "

J. Donaldson "Blackmoore"

She is sure, that Miss St.Claire is an interloper, or maybe she gave her a "nickname":)? Any other suggestions?

Thank you in advance!