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Profile: Tyoma
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User Name: Tyoma
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Wednesday, October 31, 2018
Last Visit: Saturday, November 10, 2018 2:15:29 AM
Number of Posts: 21
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Will all Russians go to heaven?
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 2:06:35 AM
Алексей Кравченко wrote:
I want to say that after Maidan …life has become much worse for everyone.

What you say means that you are not able to see any connection between the population’s living standards and the annexation of about 5% of Ukraine’s territory, which happened a couple of days after Maidan. I wonder if the living standards in Britain would remain unchanged if more than half of Wales got annexed by another country (in proportion to the territory of the occupied part of Donbas).

What you say also means that you are not able to see any connection between the population’s living standards and the war that Ukraine wages against Russian troops and the rebels, that Russia has been supporting with weapons and provision for over four years, the war being launched just one month after Maidan. I also wonder if the living standards in Britain would remain unchanged if it had to deal with the same on the territory with population of 5.5 million people (in proportion to the population of the occupied part of Donbas).


Алексей Кравченко wrote:
Half of the country hates Russia, half treats it well.

In those surveys, many people state their attitude to Russia as a suffering neighboring Slavic people, that is, the country they speak the same language and the country where their relatives live. You should differentiate between people’s attitude to Russia as a country and their attitude to Russia as a state, whose aggressive policy has been condemned by the UNO, PASE and OSCE.

Алексей Кравченко wrote:
The eastern part of Ukraine dreams of Russia.

Dreams? Can you describe exactly what their dreams are like? Any evidence?

Алексей Кравченко wrote:
The whole of Western Ukraine … drink and throw garbage right on the streets.

Does this mean that people in Eastern Ukraine don’t drink and don’t throw garbage on the streets?

Алексей Кравченко wrote:
The whole of Western Ukraine … are ready to kill even their own wife, if the political views do not coincide.

Do you have any data about how many wives have been killed in the Western Ukraine because of different political views in the families?

Алексей Кравченко wrote:
As for the bad attitude of Russians towards Europe and America, this is chauvinism in places and nothing more than confusion.

Thank God that Russia's rich and especially the richest people don’t suffer from that confusion. They have always been buying real estate in Europe and the USA, have been sending their children to the best universities there, have been going there to get the best medical treatment and have been spending their holidays in the “rotten” West.

Topic: some/any
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 12:15:43 AM
FounDit wrote:
In American English, however, we almost never use "shall" unless we are quoting some old-fashioned English such as "Never the twain shall meet". We would most often say, "Should".

The Google Ngram Viewer tool says that 'Shall I' in American English is a bit more common than 'Should I', and the difference is even bigger in British English. Think

http://goo.gl/iWNzLc
http://goo.gl/MJ6KwN

Topic: some/any
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 3:41:50 PM
Thank you, FounDit.

Can I say that we ask “Shall I buy some eggs?” when we offer to buy eggs?

Can I say that we ask “Shall I buy any eggs?” when we have no idea if eggs are needed and just ask for instructions whether to buy them or not.
Topic: some/any
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 2:07:18 PM
1. "Shall I buy some eggs?"
2. "Shall I buy any eggs?"

Can you tell me which is correct, please?
Topic: An Open Letter to the Admin
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 8:47:31 AM
Magnus v G wrote:
BobShilling wrote:
I long ago stopped recommending this site to my students. I am sure that I am not alone

Can't you recommend the site but just warn them of the forum?

I don’t see any sense even in BobShilling warning his students off the forum. 99.99 % of the threads here go without any quarrels. Those who come here to learn will just skip a quarrel. You might hear a bad word in the street, but it cannot be a reason to only keep your teenagers at home and not to let them go anywhere in town.

Topic: 'When I said that your English had (been) improved,' (Passive or Active)
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 7:49:21 AM
A cooperator wrote:
"Your English was much improved over last year."

"Your English was much improved over last year" sounds like someone else improved your English while you were in a hypnotic sleep.
Topic: 'When I said that your English had (been) improved,' (Passive or Active)
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 4:37:15 AM
A cooperator wrote:
in my example why an active verb "improve" used. As long as "English" is a moveless subject, and cannot get better by itself, then how could 'English' be the subject of an active action?


It is just the way it is with inanimate objects in English.

Houses shake during an earthquake.
Balls roll on the ground.
Waves break against the shore.

Topic: café
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 2:26:08 AM
Right, Drag0. That is a huge breakfast. One should go hungry for at least a day in order to be able to eat up all of those.

Thank you, everyone.
Topic: "Nationalism"?
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 1:59:14 AM
Tyoma wrote:
Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
What people regret is losing territories.

What you just said clearly shows that the inhabitants of the former federal state of Russia of the former USSR consider the rest fourteen federal states their own territories.

Hello?
Does the silence mean consent?

Topic: English Grammar - Predicates
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 1:51:29 AM
FounDit wrote:
Modifying the subject is what the predicate does.

Oh, really?

“If a word or phrase modifies another word or phrase used with it, it limits or adds to its meaning.” (Cambridge Dictionary)

In “My brother is swimming” the predicate “is swimming” doesn’t change in any way the meaning of the phrase “my brother”. He is just “my brother”, regardless of whatever he is doing at the moment.

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