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Profile: Reiko07
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User Name: Reiko07
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Joined: Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Last Visit: Monday, December 9, 2019 8:27:58 AM
Number of Posts: 704
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The plane crashed into the ground and broke into pieces.
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2019 1:02:33 AM
The plane crashed into the ground and broke into pieces.
[my sentence]

Question: Does the repetition of into sound weird to you?

My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: He advocated higher salaries for teachers.
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 1:39:20 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I would say that "for teachers" describes the salaries, and so it an adjectival phrase.

"higher salaries for teachers" is a noun-phrase. That is what he advocated.

Thanks, Drag0nspeaker. Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: He advocated higher salaries for teachers.
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 10:59:44 AM
He advocated higher salaries for teachers.
[From an English-Japanese dictionary.]

Quesition: Which of the following two analyses is correct?

(1) "for teachers" functions as an adjective and modifies "higher salaries".

(2) "for teachers" functions as an adverb and modifies "advocated higher salaries".


My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 9:14:02 AM
Romany wrote:
Reiko,

The sentence 4) you provided above would probably be more "natural" as: -

"The discovery has more theoretical than practical significance."
"The significance of the discovery is more theoretical than practical."

Thanks, Romany. Angel


My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 1:45:20 AM
FounDit wrote:
Reiko07 wrote:
[quote=Romany]
Is the following sentence correct?

(4) The discovery has more of a theoretical significance than of a practical significance.

This one is similar to the others. If you say, "The discovery has more significance...", this is a solid beginning and can be a complete sentence. But to say the discovery has more of a theoretical significance leaves open the question of how you can have more OF a significance, theoretical or not. It is either significant or it isn't. It can be more significant, or less, but more OF a significance? It is like dividing up significance and assigning parts of it.

Thanks, FounDit. Angel


My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Saturday, December 7, 2019 4:49:38 PM
Romany wrote:
Reiko -

But then, what does "it" refer to?

"It" has (owns? possesses?) more area in a city, than It owns of a town?

Thanks, Romany. Angel

I now think (3) is too vague to work.

Is the following sentence correct?

(4) The discovery has more of a theoretical significance than of a practical significance.


My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Saturday, December 7, 2019 11:08:24 AM
Thanks a lot, FounDit. Angel

Is the following sentence possible?

(3) It has more of a city than of a town.

My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Saturday, December 7, 2019 10:12:07 AM
palapaguy wrote:
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) It's more a city than a town.

(2) It's more of a city than a town.

Which is natural in speech?

Which is natural in writing?

Both are commonly used. But only (1) is grammatically correct.


Thanks, palapaguy. Angel

Would you say the following sentence is ungrammatical?

What she did was more of a mistake than a crime.
(Macmillan Dictionary, more)

My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Saturday, December 7, 2019 12:35:46 AM
FounDit wrote:
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) It's more a city than a town.

(2) It's more of a city than a town.

Which is natural in speech?

Which is natural in writing?


You may already know this from the source of this sentence, but just to add a bit to how we see it, I wanted to add some information.

In (1) It's more a city than a town, the word "It's" would refer to the town itself. It (the town) is more a city than a town.

In (2) It's more of a city than a town, more words have been left out, but we understand what is meant. Again, "It's" refers to the town.
It (The town's structure/design) is more (that) of a city than a town.

Applause Thanks, FounDit. Angel

My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.
Topic: It's more (of) a city than a town.
Posted: Friday, December 6, 2019 2:38:40 AM
Thanks, Romany. Angel


My English is probably at CEFR A2 level.

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