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Profile: Reiko07
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User Name: Reiko07
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Last Visit: Monday, October 14, 2019 1:09:20 AM
Number of Posts: 557
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: not until (word order)
Posted: Monday, October 14, 2019 12:58:04 AM
Applause Thanks, thar. Angel

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: not until (word order)
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 11:46:24 PM
(1) Not until he was eleven years old did Alice realize her son was a math prodigy.

(2) Not until her son was eleven years old did Alice realize he was a math prodigy.

(3) Not until he was eleven years old did Brian realize his son was a math prodigy.

(4) Not until his son was eleven years old did Brian realize he was a math prodigy.

Which is natural?

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: a/the seemingly infinite number of
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 9:56:03 PM
Thanks, coag. Angel

coag wrote:
In mathematics, there are different kinds of infinite sets (N,Z,R).

Yes, and we have Q and H. 😉

coag wrote:
Numbers of examples in COCA are as follows.

"a seemingly infinite number of" 4
"the seemingly infinite number of" 2

It seems that endless also works.

"a seemingly endless number of" --- 11 examples in COCA

"the seemingly endless number of" --- 5 examples in COCA

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: a/the seemingly infinite number of
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 2:56:42 PM
Applause Thanks, Weasel. Angel

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: a/the seemingly infinite number of
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 11:52:28 AM
Thanks, FounDit. Angel

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: a/the seemingly infinite number of
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 11:30:25 AM
The Japanese language is in stark contrast to the English language in many ways. It wouldn't be too much to say that English is a million miles away from Japanese. Nevertheless, little effort has been made to help Japanese learners of English surmount a/the seemingly infinite number of obstacles arising from the differences between English and Japanese.
[my sentences]

Which is correct, a or the?

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: How many (people) are in your family?
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 11:07:26 PM
srirr wrote:
No, it is not.

'many' is a quantifier which requires some noun. In some cases, this noun may remain hidden, but not at this place.

Thanks, srirr. Angel Is the following sentence correct?

How many of you attended the meeting?

thar wrote:
I think it can be omitted, but you have to choose the right structure.

Thanks, thar. Angel

Blodybeef wrote:
I think it is not optional.

Thanks, Blodybeef. Angel

Romany wrote:

Blodybeef is right: the sentence on it's own could confuse: because it doesn't specify whether it means your immediate family (Mum, Dad, sublings) or your extended family (Aunties, cousins, Uncles, relative-by-marriage).

It would be used in an ongoing conversation where the definition of "family" was clear. In fact, in a spoken conversation about this, one would say "How many in your family?" ("people" is understood: one isn't talking about dogs or tigers!).

""I've three brothers, two sisters, a step-mum and a biological mum, a step-father and three grandparents; all living in our flat at the moment. It's bedlam! How many in your family?" The conversation tells us that we are discussing immediate family, who live in our family home.

Thanks, Romany. Angel

I think most Japanese people would take "How many people are (there) in your family?" to mean "How many people are (there) in your household?".


My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: How many (people) are in your family?
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 1:02:05 AM
How many people are in your family?

Question:

Is people optional?

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: <switch off the light> vs. <switch the light off>
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 11:42:54 PM
Thanks, palapaguy. Angel

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: <switch off the light> vs. <switch the light off>
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 10:22:54 PM
(1) Could you switch off the light?
[From Swan's Practical English Usage, 3rd ed., 21.1.]

(2) Could you switch the light off?

Is it OK to use #2 if the light has previously been referred to (e.g., "This light consumes a lot of electricity.")?

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.

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