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Profile: Reiko07
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User Name: Reiko07
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Joined: Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Last Visit: Friday, February 22, 2019 10:35:56 PM
Number of Posts: 155
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.
Posted: Thursday, February 21, 2019 1:20:15 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Reiko07 wrote:
1) This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.

2) This is as close to the lake as we can get by car.
I break them down like this (they can't be made into "that" phrases).

1) This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.
"This" is the subject
"is" is the linking-verb
"as close as we can get" is the main subject-complement (adjectival phrase)
"close" is the main adjective and "as . . . as we can get" modifies 'close'
"to the lake" qualifies 'as close as we can get' so it is an adverbial phrase
"by car" qualifies 'get', so is an adverbial phrase

2) This is as close to the lake as we can get by car.
"This" is the subject
"is" is the linking-verb
"close to the lake" is the main subject-complement (adjectival phrase)
"close" is an adjective, and "to the lake" is an (adverbial) preposition phrase which modifies "close"
"as . . . as we can get" modifies "close to the lake", so is an adverbial phrase
"by car" qualifies 'get', so is an adverbial phrase.

*****************
They all (all six) say the same thing, really. The difference is that #1 and #2 have an adjectival complement (based on 'close') and #3 to #6 have a 'noun-phrase' complement (based on "the closest").

Applause Applause Thank you very much, DS. Dancing Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 11:46:01 PM
palapaguy wrote:
I agree with DragO, but I wonder whether "as close as we can get" could be improved by changing it to "the closest we can get." Thoughts?

Thanks a lot, palapaguy. Dancing

3) This is the closest we can get to the lake by car.

4) This is the closest to the lake we can get by car.


I prefer #3 to #4.

*************************************
I analyze #3 and #4 as follows:

3) This is the closest we can get to the lake by car.
=
5) This is the closest that we can get to the lake by car.


4) This is the closest to the lake we can get by car.
=
6) This is the closest to the lake that we can get by car.


In #5, the antecedent of that is the closest.

In #6, the antecedent of that is the closest to the lake.
*************************************

I don't know whether or not #1 and #2 can be analyzed this way.







My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 8:28:43 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi Reiko.
I don't know why this hasn't been answered.

I think both are grammatically correct. I'm certain that you will hear sentences similar to both in 'normal English conversation'.

Really, it is just a matter of the phrases you use.

In the first, the speaker has chosen "as close as we can get" as the main subject complement and "to the lake" and "by car" as further modifiers.
"This is as close as we can get" is a good sentence (if context has already said where you are trying to get).

In the second, the speaker has chosen "close to the lake" as the MAIN complement, and modified it with "as . . .as we can get" and "by car".

I prefer the second.

Thank you very much, DS. Applause Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: fastest
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 7:15:05 PM
FounDit wrote:
All the sentence says it that 50 mph is the fastest it goes under the circumstances, or at any particular time.

Do you mean "The whole sentence says ..."?

Thank you very much for the reply.

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: beer bottle
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 8:07:23 AM
Blodybeef wrote:
The best beer bottle is an empty beer bottle (hic).

Thanks a lot, Blodybeef. Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: beer bottle
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 8:05:01 AM
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Yes, it's perfectly ok, grammatically. And semantically, too.

Personally, I don't like bottles of beer. So, I try to empty them as beer bottles.

Thanks a lot, JJ. Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: beer bottle
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 1:11:12 AM
A bottle of beer is not empty, while a beer bottle may or may not be empty.

Is this sentence grammatically correct?

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: fastest
Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2019 11:07:44 PM
The fastest the car goes is about 50mph.
(Source)

Is "speed" implied after "fastest"?

I suppose that the following equation holds:

(1) The fastest the car goes is about 50 mph.
=
(2) The fastest speed the car can go is about 50 mph.
=
(3) The fastest speed that the car can go is about 50 mph.
=
(4) The fastest speed at which the car can go is about 50 mph.

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: Your sentence does not make any sense to me at all.
Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2019 12:29:28 PM
thar wrote:
For a more natural sentence, you probably wouldn't have the two phrases.

'doesn't make any sense' = makes no sense

At all = absolutely

Your sentence makes [absolutely] no sense to me.

Thanks a lot. Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Topic: This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.
Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2019 12:16:27 PM
1) This is as close as we can get to the lake by car.

2) This is as close to the lake as we can get by car.


(my original sentences)

Which is correct?

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.

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