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Profile: Reiko07
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User Name: Reiko07
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Last Visit: Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:28:20 PM
Number of Posts: 933
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The mall is totally out of kilter with the rest of the country.
Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:27:46 PM
Thank you all.

Topic: The mall is totally out of kilter with the rest of the country.
Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2020 2:14:59 AM
The mall is totally out of kilter with the rest of the country.
Macmillan Dictionary

Question: Does with mean "in comparison or contrast to"?


Topic: The district's budget was $9 million out of kilter.
Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2020 12:11:29 AM
Thanks, tautophile.

Topic: The district's budget was $9 million out of kilter.
Posted: Wednesday, February 26, 2020 9:08:22 PM
The district's budget was $9 million out of kilter.
(Longman Advanced American Dictionary)

Question: What does this sentence mean?


Topic: She'll have left yesterday.
Posted: Wednesday, February 26, 2020 8:29:26 PM
Thanks, Romany and thar.

Topic: She'll have left yesterday.
Posted: Wednesday, February 26, 2020 1:09:16 AM
Romany wrote:

It sounds perfectly natural to me because it's used in some dialects of English.

But I'm surprised to find it in an English/Japanese dictionary - it's not Standard Usage. If you try parsing it, you'll find it's unsatisfactory.

Not having been brought up where this is a "natural" sentence, it's not something I have ever said. It's really just a way of saying "She left."

Because it's not Standard English, there's no need to learn how it's used and said - you could go through your whole life and not ever hear it spoken.

Thanks, Romany. I'm a bit surprised at your response. Here's a quote from Swan's Practical English Usage, 3rd ed.(p.616):

Quote:

3 certainty

Will can express certainty or confidence about present or future situations.

As I’m sure you will understand, we cannot wait any longer for our order.
Don’t phone them now - they’ll be having dinner.
There's somebody coming up the stairs. ~ That’ll be Emily.
Tomorrow will be cloudy, with some rain.

Will have + past participle refers to the past.

Dear Sir, You will recently have received a form . . .
We can't go and see them now - they’ll have gone to bed.



Topic: The girl likes reading/to read children's novels/novels for children.
Posted: Wednesday, February 26, 2020 12:13:06 AM
Thanks, Romany.

Topic: She'll have left yesterday.
Posted: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 4:45:31 AM
She'll have left yesterday.
(From an English-Japanese dictionary.)

Does this sentence sound perfectly natural to you?

Topic: The girl likes reading/to read children's novels/novels for children.
Posted: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 2:34:12 AM
Thanks, Romany. Does the following sentence work for you?

(5) The girl likes reading children's literature.

Topic: The girl likes reading/to read children's novels/novels for children.
Posted: Monday, February 24, 2020 6:19:33 PM
(1) The girl likes reading children's novels.

(2) The girl likes reading novels for children.

(3) The girl likes to read children's novels.

(4) The girl likes to read novels for children.

Which sentence sounds natural to you?