The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Fyfardens
About
User Name: Fyfardens
Forum Rank: Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Saturday, December 16, 2017
Last Visit: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:38:00 PM
Number of Posts: 204
[0.02% of all post / 6.18 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: "still" at the end of a sentence
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:59:00 AM
Romany wrote:

"I love her still", "It's my favourite still", "We go there still" etc. may still be used poetically; but would you really think its "correct" in normal conversation?


Perhaps it's my advanced age, but I still use and hear this end-position, though not very often, I must confess.

I agree that learners should avoid it - it is the least common position and can sound unnatural

The point I was making was it is not accurate to say it is 'wrong'. Robjen's sentence was possible, even if not many native speakers would utter it.
Topic: It belonged to his father
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 6:38:45 AM
True, but as you were told in another forum in which you ask similar questions:

"The point about prepositions is that, in addition to a 'core' meaning or two, many can be used in dozens of idiosyncratic ways. It is far more useful for learners to note the phrases in which they are used rather than try to pin down the precise meaning of the prepositions within the phrases."
Topic: It belonged to his father
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 5:38:44 AM
Tara2 wrote:

Thank you so much thar, but you found one that fits exactly.


Thar did not find a definition that fitted exactly. What he did was explain the meaning of belong + to.

You really must try to stop finding definitions/meanings for individual prepositions.
Topic: "still" at the end of a sentence
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:42:54 AM
robjen wrote:
Is it wrong to put "still" at the end of any sentences?


No, it isn't wrong. It puts extra emphasis on the word.

However, as other have pointed out, it is not common. I recommend that learners avoid this.
Topic: did or had done
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:38:28 AM
In a that- clause after wish. we generally use the same tenses as we would use, for instance, after 'it would be nice if ...'. Past tenses are uses with a present or future meaning.

I wish I spoke French. (= It would be nice if I spoke French.)

[...]

Past perfect tenses are used for wishes in the past.

I wish you hadn't said that. (= It would be nice if you hadn't said that.)


Swan Michael (2005.631). Practical English Usage (3rd edn), Oxford: OUP.
Topic: did or had done
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:10:34 AM


a) I wish I didn't do it. The speaker is expressing regret about something they do in the present time.

b) I wish I hadn't done it. The speaker is expressing regret about something they did in the past.


They are not interchangeable.




Topic: As to whatever
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 4:04:02 PM
Tara2 wrote:

As to whatever you should marry him-that's for you to decide.


Are you sure the speaker didn't say 'whether' rather than 'whatever'?
Topic: 'A murder-suicide' (a noun is modified by a hyphenated descriptor OR compound adjective)
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 1:00:00 AM
The groups of words below are all English sentences. Like the vast majority of sentences in English they consist of a verb (or verbs) and the subject of the verb(s). They may contain other elements. As in the vast majority of sentences in English that are not questions, the subject comes before the verb, and the object (if there is one) comes after the verb.


I teach.
I teach English.
I teach adults.
I teach adults English.

I am a teacher.
I am tall.
I am unhappy.
I am at home.

I am working.

I was bullied at school.



Topic: 'A murder-suicide' (a noun is modified by a hyphenated descriptor OR compound adjective)
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:58:11 PM
A cooperator wrote:
I would like you to explain to me why you do call "Romany is beautiful." a verbal sentence where the doer "subject" doesn't do any action, however, the subject is the one being talked about.


Romany did not mention 'verbal' sentences. These are apparently part of Arabic grammar., nt English grammar.


We have told you on many occasions to forget Arabic grammar when you are talking about English grammar. The two systems work in different ways.
Topic: Should the comma be inside or outside the close inverted commas?
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:52:42 PM
Yes.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.