The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: madoman
About
User Name: madoman
Forum Rank: Newbie
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Sunday, November 26, 2017
Last Visit: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 1:53:10 AM
Number of Posts: 9
[0.00% of all post / 0.56 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Can you please help decide the correct verb?
Posted: Monday, December 04, 2017 9:56:35 PM
I hope someone helps. I have a job application that I need to submit in a couple of hours. Thank you very much in advance!
Topic: Punctuation and others
Posted: Monday, December 04, 2017 9:55:33 PM
Thank you all very much!
Topic: Can you please help decide the correct verb?
Posted: Monday, December 04, 2017 12:17:29 AM
Hi all,

Please leave the construction the same way - unless there is something seriously wrong with it - and please help decide the verb:


There IS much information to be reviewed and processed, and more information to be obtained, then many meetings to be made.

vs.

There ARE much information to be reviewed and processed, and more information to be obtained, then many meetings to be made.



The confusion is not because of the uncountable noun 'information' but rather because the construction of the sentence should suggest:

- There IS/ARE 1) much information to be reviewed and processed and 2) more information to be obtained then 3) many meetings to be made.

But since the flow of the sentence seems interrupted, I think 'is' the right verb to be, but not sure if this would be ok because the rest will be without a verb then. Again, the key is to keep the construction the same because it relays a specific message.



Thank you very much!
Topic: Punctuation and others
Posted: Sunday, December 03, 2017 4:55:29 PM
Thank you all for your replies!

3. Regarding how he was surprised, the word I am trying to think about is to describe how he couldn't believe that they got divorced, how it did not make sense. Surprised is good, but it's in formal context, so I am wondering if there are any other suggestions.

4. Regarding 'hanging over my head,' I am looking for an expression to describe how the question preoccupied the person. Something like, "Really, how come we ended up with a divorce? I should think it through and see if we should reconcile." It is in a formal (or semi-formal) context. Is 'preoccupied' good here?


Thank you all again!
Topic: Punctuation and others
Posted: Sunday, December 03, 2017 10:40:37 AM
Hi all,

A few things please.


1. How should the below be?
- All changed one day while we were eating together when he asked me "how come you and Mary are divorced now?"
vs
- All changed one day while we were eating together when he asked me "How come you and Mary are divorced now?"


2. Commas after and:
- He was tall, strong, and hardworking.
vs.
- He was tall, strong and hardworking.

This punctuation issue has always been confusing. Any difference between American and British English?


3. Adjective options:
In the first example about Mary, he was surprised because Mary and I were good couples so divorce was not something anticipated. What other adjectives (other than surprised) can be used to to describe him?


4. Hanging over my head:
Again, in the first example about Mary, that question "how come you and Mary are divorced now" kept hanging over my head for weeks because there is truth to what he said. Is it formal to use "hanging over my head?" Are there other options to describe how the question kept me thinking?


Thank you all very much!
Topic: Correct verb to be to use
Posted: Sunday, December 03, 2017 10:24:39 AM
Thank you!
Topic: Correct verb to be to use
Posted: Saturday, December 02, 2017 9:26:00 PM
Hi all,

Should 'are' or 'is' be used here?

- There IS much information to be reviewed and processed, and more information to be obtained, then many meetings to be made.
vs
- There ARE much information to be reviewed and processed, and more information to be obtained, then many meetings to be made.

also do we need to include 'are' as in below:

- There IS much information to be reviewed and processed, and more information to be obtained, then many meetings to be made.
vs
- There IS much information to be reviewed and processed, and more information to be obtained, then many meetings ARE to be made.

Can you please explain why you chose one versus the other?
Thank you very much!
Topic: Which adverb and verb to use.
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 11:17:43 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello - I'm a native British English speaker (that is, I'm English and I have spoken English all my life - 67 years). Maybe you'll get a Native American to answer, but I'm not sure.

I would say that the student didn't have an answer to the question (but "for" sounds OK, too).

I would say 'surprised' - he was surprised by the comment.
It surprised him.

As you say, 'troubled' and 'worried' don't seem quite right. "Puzzled" sounds good too.
I might use 'bemused', but that may be a little formal for many people.




Thank you very much for your reply. Very appreciated.

The funny thing I literally just thought of 'surprised' 10 minutes ago and now just saw your reply. Frankly, I was surprised Anxious

Thanks again!
Topic: Which adverb and verb to use.
Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 12:06:15 AM
Hi all,

Here is a scenario. A medical student and his supervisor are chatting. The student tells the supervisor he does not like surgery and does not want to be a surgeon. A few months later, they meet again, they are doing a procedure together which seems to be fun and both are enjoying it. The supervisor asks "how come you don't want to do surgery?" The student did not have an answer. He was surprised that the supervisor remembered what he told her though it was a long time ago. It seemed to have troubled him.

My questions are:

1) Should we say:
- The student did not have an answer TO his question?
- The student did not have an answer FOR his question?
What is the difference between both? Native American English speakers if any is present.


2) Regarding "troubled him" I am not sure if this is the right verb. He was just surprised and couldn't believe that the student (OR ANY STUDENT) can ever not like surgery. What would be a better verb to describe the supervisor? Sorry, I hope the picture is clear.
- It seemed to have troubled him.
- It seemed to have bothered him.
- It seemed to have puzzled him.



Thank you all!


Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.