The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Tara2
About
User Name: Tara2
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: Female
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Last Visit: Saturday, November 17, 2018 3:50:25 AM
Number of Posts: 408
[0.04% of all post / 1.09 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: would expect
Posted: Saturday, November 17, 2018 3:38:01 AM
NKM wrote:
"Would" is used because it introduces an implied conditional situation.

You would expect to see those topics if you were to enroll in one or more of those calculus classes.


Hi NKM
Is it the only implied conditional? Can't we write it in other way instead of 'if you were to enroll in one or more of those calculus classes' ?
Topic: will or present simple
Posted: Tuesday, October 30, 2018 2:02:01 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi Tara!

It's true that the simple present is often used for habits - but it is more correctly stated that it shows an action which happened in the past, present and (probably) future. This also covers (as thar mentioned) a truth - something which was, is and will be true.

The sun rises in the east. - it's not exactly a habit, it's just a past, present and future truth. It's somewhat timeless.

This exhibit illustrates the many uses of atomic energy. - the exhibit was there for some time in the past, it's there now and will be for some time in the future.

If you use the 'will illustrate', you are saying that it is all in the future.

Hi Drago!
It's helpful. Thank you :)
Can I write the two below sentences as the simple present, please?
1. "Students who pass the test will be promoted to the next grade."
2. "An infant who drinks enough milk will not be undernourished."

Can't I write these because they're just in future, right?
Topic: will or present simple
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2018 2:46:16 PM
thar wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Hi
Can I write #1 as #2? Have they the same meaning?
1. "This exhibit will illustrate the many uses of atomic energy."
It will when you have made it. But that is in the future. You haven't built it yet

2. "This exhibit illustrates the many uses of atomic energy."
Habit, truth - the exhibit exists. It illustrates the uses of atomic energy. That is what it does. There is no time-frame involved.


So it depends what you mean.

If you haven't made it yet, you say 1. You could say 2 if you already have the design idea - what the purpose of the exhibit is.

If it exists, and people can see it, you say 2. 1 sounds odd because it is already doing it.

Thank you thar ;)
thar wrote:

If it exists, and people can see it, you say 2.

Sorry thar, even if it's not habit , can we use 2?
Topic: will or present simple
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2018 1:54:35 PM
Hi
Can I write #1 as #2? Have they the same meaning?
1. "This exhibit will illustrate the many uses of atomic energy."
2. "This exhibit illustrates the many uses of atomic energy."
Topic: would
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 10:33:51 AM
I understand. As you and FounDit explained that because it's true of him it is not conditional. Sorry thar I wanted to delete the previous post but I couldn't. Thank you again.
Topic: would
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 6:33:07 AM
thar wrote:

Conditional
Present
If Connie were not so busy, she would be sure of getting everything done on time.

Past
If Connie had not been so busy, she would have been sure of getting everything done on time.


Sorry thar, Can't I think of first sentence as conditional like the below?
"Ulysses was a man who would not reject any venture If there was one, no matter how dangerous."
Topic: would
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 4:27:57 AM
thar wrote:
The past tense of 'will' is 'would'.

The past tense of 'would' is 'would have'.

So if a sentence is in the past time, and includes the verb 'would' then that is a past tense.
If in doubt, see what happens when you put it into the present and see if it is talking about the future.

Present
"Connie has such an awesome amount of work to complete before graduation she doubts she will have everything ready in time."

"Hmmm," thinks Connie. "I have so much work to do before graduation. It is only one month away. Will I be ready in time?"
Yes, that makes sense.

Past
"Connie had such an awesome amount of work to complete before graduation she doubted she would have everything ready in time."


Conditional
Present
If Connie were not so busy, she would be sure of getting everything done on time.

Past
If Connie had not been so busy, she would have been sure of getting everything done on time.




Thank you thar for the very good explanation :)
Topic: would
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2018 3:42:19 AM
Is this one future in the past?
"Connie had such an awesome amount of work to complete before graduation she doubted she would have everything ready in time."
Topic: would
Posted: Saturday, October 27, 2018 12:59:23 PM
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Hi
I can't decide 'would' is future in past or conditional. Can you please explain?
"Ulysses was a man who would not reject any venture, no matter how dangerous."


There are two time periods here: the present when we are speaking of someone in the past, and the time period of the person in the past.

From the point of view of Ulysses, he was willing to take on any venture that might be presented to him. Putting it in the negative form, "he would not reject any venture". The adventure is presented to him in his present, but being willing to undertake it is his future, so he "would" do it as a present continuous into his future. He would not reject it.



Thank you FounDit :)
How should I know it's habitual? Why is it past continuous ("he was willing") From the point of view of Ulysses not the simple past, please?


We are simply told that Ulysses would not reject an venture; that it was a habit with him. We simply accept that as true. It isn't so much "past continuous" because for Ulysses, it is his present. It is the past for us, but we are looking at "would" from the point of view of Ulysses. It is his present continuous going into his future. The only "past" part is our point of view in looking back at the time of Ulysses.

So the writer is asking you to look back from today to the time of Ulysses, and see it from his point of view, what he "would" do. Since that is true of him, it remains true even for us today because we are told it was true of him.

Am I making this any more clear or adding to your confusion...*Laughing*

You've explained it very well FounDit. Thank you again :)
Topic: would
Posted: Saturday, October 27, 2018 11:02:37 AM
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Hi
I can't decide 'would' is future in past or conditional. Can you please explain?
"Ulysses was a man who would not reject any venture, no matter how dangerous."


There are two time periods here: the present when we are speaking of someone in the past, and the time period of the person in the past.

From the point of view of Ulysses, he was willing to take on any venture that might be presented to him. Putting it in the negative form, "he would not reject any venture". The adventure is presented to him in his present, but being willing to undertake it is his future, so he "would" do it as a present continuous into his future. He would not reject it.



Thank you FounDit :)
How should I know it's habitual? Why is it past continuous ("he was willing") From the point of view of Ulysses not the simple past, please?

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.