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Profile: Tara2
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User Name: Tara2
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Last Visit: Monday, March 18, 2019 5:43:58 PM
Number of Posts: 541
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: big eyes
Posted: Sunday, March 17, 2019 8:13:41 AM
thar wrote:
It is a European folk tale 'Little Red Riding Hood'. A wolf kills and eats a girl's grandmother, then dresses up in the grandmother's clothes, gets into her bed and waits for the girl to arrive. When she does, she questions that her grandmother looks a little bit different from usual!
The closest to the folk tale is the last picture.

But the famous lines include 'Grandma, what big eyes you have', 'Grandma, what big teeth you have' ( Little Red Riding Hood is obviously not particularly smart if she can't tell the difference between a wolf and her grandmother, but we will let that issue pass. Whistle )


The first two are cartoons that take that famous line and play with it - the grandmother is hurt by the insults about her personal appearance. Those aren't stories, just jokes, taking the lines from the story and making a joke from it, about insulting someone's appearance or making them feel so insecure they have cosmetic surgery.

Like most folk tales, it is actually pretty horrific:

Quote:
When the girl arrives, she notices that her grandmother looks very strange. Little Red then says, "What a deep voice you have!" ("The better to greet you with", responds the wolf), "Goodness, what big eyes you have!" ("The better to see you with", responds the wolf), "And what big hands you have!" ("The better to hug/grab you with", responds the wolf), and lastly, "What a big mouth you have" ("The better to eat you with!", responds the wolf), at which point the wolf jumps out of bed and eats her up too.


But since this is told to children, there are less gory versions where she survives.

In some of the folk story versions she survives, but it is still pretty brutal:
Quote:
A woodcutter in the French version, but a hunter in the Brothers Grimm and traditional German versions, comes to the rescue with an axe, and cuts open the sleeping wolf. Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother emerge unharmed. Then they fill the wolf's body with heavy stones. The wolf awakens and attempts to flee, but the stones cause him to collapse and die. Sanitized versions of the story have the grandmother locked in the closet instead of being eaten and some have Little Red Riding Hood saved by the lumberjack as the wolf advances on her rather than after she gets eaten, where the woodcutter kills the wolf with his axe.[4]



Personally, I am on the side of the wolf. The wolf has to eat! And anybody that stupid deserves to be eaten! Whistle

quotations from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Riding_Hood


Also completely subverted to be a lesson about obeying your mother, avoiding strangers, and not going to meet people you have met on the internet! Sad, making children grow up thinking strangers are a danger. Careful, yes. Terrified, no. Wrong message, destroys society, produces damaged adults. (Personal opinion).

Little Red Riding Hood story




Thank you so much thar!!!!
I am on the side of the poor stupid Grandma. She was born stupid.
Never meet people you have met on the internet!---He always was saying this
Topic: big eyes
Posted: Sunday, March 17, 2019 6:31:13 AM
thar wrote:





sad.

I prefer


Hi thar
Are these pictures from story books?
What is their names please?
Topic: My smartphone needs/is needing recharging.
Posted: Thursday, March 7, 2019 12:42:14 PM
Thank you sooo much Drago for the very good explanation :)
Topic: My smartphone needs/is needing recharging.
Posted: Thursday, March 7, 2019 11:46:07 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
That's a good question!

I'm looking forward to seeing you again. - this definitely seems to be what's happening now (with 'now' being "this bit of time between thinking of you and tonight when I go to sleep" or something like that). It's an action in present time. What are you doing? I'm looking forward to next week.

I look forward to seeing you again. - it's not VERY different. It seems to be more "This is the state I'm in right now" - stative.

Thanks a lot Drago :)
I asled this question here too since someone sain it's stative and someone else said it states a fact.
So can't it be "states a fact"?

Topic: My smartphone needs/is needing recharging.
Posted: Thursday, March 7, 2019 10:47:34 AM
thar wrote:
No.

You would never say 'is needing' that I can think of. Think

(edit - except something like 'he is needing more and more help as time goes by'. But that is not the general usage.)

It is a state, not an action that is just happening now. It is true or false. It needs charging ( a state, a 'truth') or it is fully charged (also a state, expressed with an adjective).
It is a not an action that it is doing just at this moment.

Is "look forward" in "I look forward to something" stative or it states a fact, please?
Topic: Empty
Posted: Sunday, March 3, 2019 1:14:23 PM
Empty
Topic: Would
Posted: Friday, March 1, 2019 7:32:37 AM
thar wrote:
Sort of.

Remember that 'will' is not just about the time in the future. It is one way of forming a future tense, but it has another meaning that is why it can be used to form a future tense.

'will' is about determination to do something ;the noun 'will' means your intent, want.

'won't' is about refusal, a determination not to do something. You don't want to do it, and you refuse to.

So in the past, "wouldn't" can mean "refused to" in the right context.

Whistle Whistle
Topic: delude
Posted: Friday, March 1, 2019 7:26:37 AM
thar wrote:
Romans were obviously very nasty people, if their idea of play was mocking people!

ludo - I play, I mock, I make fun of, I deceive, I trick

delude - deceive
ludicrous - idiotic, worthy of mockery
prelude - before play
interlude - between play
collude - trick with
elude - out of trick
allude - play to

Whistle

Whistle Whistle
Topic: minerals
Posted: Thursday, February 28, 2019 12:39:03 PM
thar wrote:
Hard water doesn't contain minerals. It is liquid! It contains dissolved ions.

Those ions came from minerals, and if the conditions are right they can precipitate as minerals - but they are not minerals when they are dissolved in the water!

Whistle

Whistle Whistle
Topic: Present perfect
Posted: Thursday, February 28, 2019 3:44:14 AM
Sorry thar, if I mean that why they are studying English in this forum, should I say Why are they studying English here, right?

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