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Profile: Tara2
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User Name: Tara2
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Gender: Female
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Joined: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Last Visit: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 12:13:36 PM
Number of Posts: 362
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: take
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 9:37:26 AM
lazarius wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Sorry Wilmar, Do you mean what sentence?

He means that when you gulp medicine you take it in while when you steal you take it out. And that's quite a difference, you know.

--

Thank you!
Topic: take
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 6:53:43 AM
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
Disagree... I would be surprised if this sentence wasn't about consuming aspirin and other pain killers as medicine.

Sorry Wilmar, Do you mean what sentence?
Topic: take
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:50:06 PM
thar wrote:
Yes, but there is a difference!

I am sure there are other circumstances where you could use those words, but it would be less common.
If you carry it, you take it away, or you carry it.

eg
A removal firm is moving your furniture.
You wonder if they have started work.
Has anything been taken away, yet?

Taking medicines
The patient has several different pills to take.
Have any of them been taken yet?

It is all about context, but with that simple phrase -99 times out of a hundred it will be about somthing being stolen.
It needn't be physically carried.
Someone has hacked into our computer system and accessed our files.
Has anything been taken?
Yes, they stole our lunch menus for the entire month.


I understand. Thank you again thar :)
Topic: take
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:29:58 PM
thar wrote:
No, it this case it probably means stolen.


You answered my question quickly :), Thank you
But if something is carried isn't like it's stolen?

Topic: take
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:25:33 PM
Does 'take' mean 'carry'?
"Has anything been taken"
Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/take
Topic: take
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 1:22:18 PM
sureshot wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Hi
What does 'take' mean?
"Those who take aspirins and other pain-killers regularly should realize that they may become drug addicts, too."

--------------------

The verb "take" has a variety of meanings. In the given sentence, "take" means "consume as medicine".
You may like to refer standard dictionaries to understand the variety of meanings.


Thank you!
Topic: take
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 11:03:52 AM
Hi
What does 'take' mean?
"Those who take aspirins and other pain-killers regularly should realize that they may become drug addicts, too."
Topic: So vast is the laser beam's power
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 3:50:59 AM
sureshot wrote:

Your sentence is:

So vast is the laser beam's power that it has without a doubt the capacity to vaporize any substance located anywhere on earth.

In this sentence "so" is an adverb. The sentences starts with "so + adjective". In such cases, inversion is done i.e. the verb precedes the subject. The sentence pattern is:

So + Adjective (big, tall, weak, big etc) + verb + subject + that + clause"

You suggested pattern "So the laser beam's power is vast" does not follow the above pattern. The adverb "so" has not been followed by an adjective. So, your suggested pattern is incorrect. The pattern starting with "so + adjective" is used to say that because someone or something is very big, vast,tall, small etc, something happens as a result.

Some more examples are:

- So busy was I was this morning that I didn't have time for breakfast. (= I was so busy this morning that I didn't have time for breakfast.)
- So weak was he that he could hardly stand up. = He was so weak that he could hardly stand up.

Thank you sureshot :)











Topic: So vast is the laser beam's power
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 3:49:45 AM
thar wrote:
It is not that sort of 'so'.

There are two ways you can construct this sentence.


There is the common way:

The laser beam's power is so vast that it has without a doubt the capacity to vaporize any substance located anywhere on earth."

Or you can do it the more stylish way:

So vast is the laser beam's power that it has without a doubt the capacity to vaporize any substance located anywhere on earth."

Either way 'so vast' has to go together.
How powerful is it?
It is so powerful that it could destroy the planet.
Well, not quite that powerful.

Thank you thar :)





Topic: So vast is the laser beam's power
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 5:07:52 PM
Hi
Why isn't it "So the laser beam's power is vast"?
"So vast is the laser beam's power that it has without a doubt the capacity to vaporize any substance located anywhere on earth."

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