The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Tara2
About
User Name: Tara2
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: Female
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Last Visit: Monday, January 21, 2019 2:59:33 PM
Number of Posts: 501
[0.05% of all post / 1.13 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: ''get the job done''
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 3:08:44 PM
Hi thar
Can you please explain when "get" mean "difficulty"?
Topic: Having specified the insertion sort algorithm
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2019 11:07:09 AM
Hi
I can't understand "Having specified the insertion sort algorithm" in the sentence below. What grammatical function does it have?

"Having specified the insertion sort algorithm, we then argue that it correctly sorts, and we analyze its running time."
Topic: simple present
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2019 10:56:36 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It IS a narrative, of sorts.
However, this is also the routine always used in lessons using this book.

I know it may seem a bit odd, but if you think of it as many conversations:
Yesterday, the author explained to some students in Australia; today, to you; tomorrow, to students in the USA.

Each time, the author begins
and defines the phrase
then uses the definition . . .


Thank you Drago :)
Topic: simple present
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 11:16:16 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi Tara,
Though the present simple’s main use is for general rules, and grammatically represents timeless facts, native speakers often use it in an colloquial setting for storytelling. This can be to recount a past event, a film or book plot, or for running commentaries.

The present simple is also commonly used to give narratives of consumed stories, for example the plots of films, books and plays.

This is used to put the listener in the moment of the story. This technique is sometimes used in creative writing, as well as in spoken language.

I hope it helps.

David.

Hi David
Thank you
This book isn't a story or novel. It's my book in university.
In all books they use present simple?

Depends on the author. But as said, the present simple is commonly used to give narratives. Even though most narratives are told in the simple past, they are also written in present simple.

Narrative:
1) A story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2) A book, literary work, etc., containing such a story.
3) The art, technique, or process of narrating, or of telling a story.

David.

Thank you :)
Topic: simple present
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 8:08:00 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi Tara,
Though the present simple’s main use is for general rules, and grammatically represents timeless facts, native speakers often use it in an colloquial setting for storytelling. This can be to recount a past event, a film or book plot, or for running commentaries.

The present simple is also commonly used to give narratives of consumed stories, for example the plots of films, books and plays.

This is used to put the listener in the moment of the story. This technique is sometimes used in creative writing, as well as in spoken language.

I hope it helps.

David.

Hi David
Thank you
This book isn't a story or novel. It's my book in university.
In all books they use present simple?
Topic: simple present
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 5:01:55 AM
Hi
Can you [lease explain why the bolded verbs are written as the simple present?
"We begin by examining the insertion sort algorithm to solve the sorting problem
introduced in Chapter 1. We define a “pseudocode” that should be familiar to you if
you have done computer programming, and we use it to show how we shall specify
our algorithms. Having specified the insertion sort algorithm, we then argue that it
correctly sorts, and we analyze its running time."
Topic: mass killing
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 12:40:26 PM
Thank you taurine and Drago
Topic: mass killing
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 11:25:46 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It's a phrase with its own definition.

I believe it is now defined as murder with at least four people killed at the same time.

"Killing" is the gerund (verbal noun) - so "a mass killing" is the action, the incident of someone killing four or more people at the same time.


Thank you Drago :)
Topic: mass killing
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 10:45:49 AM
Hi
What does "mass killing" mean? does it mean "a lot of killing"? Why does "killing" have "ing"?
"The mass killing, at first carried out by death squads in front of open graves, were speeded up with more sophisticated killing devices."
Topic: literally
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 4:49:16 AM
thar wrote:
Yes - the literal meaning is the simple meaning of the word, with none of the normal variation due to metaphor or exaggeration or idiom.

Someone might say 'the employees are worked to death' where they really mean they just get worked hard. (although that is an unlikely metaphor, but the writer wants to make sure you understand them correctly). Here, in this context, they were worked to death in the literal sense of the words 'to death' - until they died.



Unfortunately, the word 'literally' has itself lost its true meaning, and some people it to mean 'very' when they are exaggerating.

eg
"that film literally scared me to death!"
No it didn't - it scared you a lot. Metaphorically'idiomatically it scared you to death. If it had done so literally, you would be dead now.

edit
be careful with 'really'. I just realised I can't tell whether you mean 'in reality' or 'very'.
That is an ambiguous word! And the other meaning does fit in with the misused meaning of literally - as an intensifier of an idiom.

Yes I meant "in reality". Thank you for the good explanation. :)

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.