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Profile: Tara2
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User Name: Tara2
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Gender: Female
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Joined: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Last Visit: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:26:57 PM
Number of Posts: 284
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: an enormous hole in the cloud opened above the airport."
Posted: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:26:56 PM
NKM wrote:
It certainly is a verb.

(And I'd add a comma before the "and ".)


Thank you so much
Topic: an enormous hole in the cloud opened above the airport."
Posted: Saturday, July 14, 2018 11:15:59 AM
Hi
Is "opened" a verb in the sentence below?
"The blades of the helicopter caused the air to circulate downwards and an enormous hole in the cloud opened above the airport."
Topic: are committed
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 7:21:33 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
papo_308 wrote:
I'm far from trying to oppose, but when working in database environment,
it's quite usual that you 'commit your work'.
But here 'commit' means 'confirm' or 'make valid'.

This doesn't appear in any of the TFD dictionaries as a meaning for "commit".

Possibly it's a 'variant of'/'compromise between' some of the other definitions.

com·mit v.tr.
1. To do, perform, or perpetrate: commit a murder.
2. To put in trust or charge; entrust: commit oneself to the care of a doctor; commit responsibilities to an assistant.
3. To consign for future use or for preservation: We must commit the necessary funds for the project.
4. To place officially in confinement or custody, as in a mental health facility.
5. To put into a place to be disposed of or kept safe: committed the manuscript to the flames.
6.
a. To make known the views of (oneself) on an issue: I never commit myself on such issues.
b. To bind, obligate, or devote, as by a pledge: They were committed to follow orders. She committed herself to her art.
7. To refer (a legislative bill, for example) to a committee.

It sounds like rather a mixture between 3, 6a, and 7, with the added implication of 'validate'.

I only gave the definition used in "crimes are committed".


Thanks a gain very much Drago
Topic: are committed
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 7:20:29 AM
papo_308 wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


"Commit" is a very specific verb meaning "do" - but it is only used for crimes.
You do not 'commit a good deed' or 'commit your work' or anything like that.
Only 'commit a crime', 'commit murder', 'commit a theft' etc.

com·mit v.tr.
1. To do, perform, or perpetrate: commit a murder.

American Heritage



I'm far from trying to oppose, but when working in database environment,
it's quite usual that you 'commit your work'.
But here 'commit' means 'confirm' or 'make valid'.
Technically this means that a transaction is successfully closed and the results become visible to other users.

Sorry, I know it doesn't exactly belong here, but because I do it every day, I couldn't help it.Silenced

Thank you so much
Topic: are committed
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 7:18:53 AM
thar wrote:
Tara2 wrote:


Does the sentence mean "poor people are criminal"?


No, it is not saying that.

The crimes are committed - that is a passive verb. It does not say who commits the crimes.

The poor people are the victims of crime. Crimes are committed against them.

But this doesn't say who commits the crimes. If it is burglary and muggings and street killings, then yes it suggests it is other people who live in the same slums who are committing those crimes.

But the crimes could be committed by other people: drug gangs, the police or vigilantes, employers who exploit the poor, rich criminals, even the government. The author could be complaining that one of these groups is responsible for committing many crimes against the slum-dwellers.

This single sentence does not explain what crimes they mean, or who is committing them. It only claims that the slum-dwellers are the victims of crime.

(edited for clarity)

You explained very well
Thank you so much thar
Topic: are committed
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 4:06:25 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello Tara.

Firstly I would like to say that the sentence is not good English - I'll note the individual problems at the end.

"Commit" is a very specific verb meaning "do" - but it is only used for crimes.
You do not 'commit a good deed' or 'commit your work' or anything like that.
Only 'commit a crime', 'commit murder', 'commit a theft' etc.

com·mit v.tr.
1. To do, perform, or perpetrate: commit a murder.

American Heritage

**************
On the other parts of the sentence:
"Slum area of our city" is very definite - specifically defined - so it needs a definite article 'the'.

You do not "inhabit in somewhere" - "in" is already included in the meaning of "inhabit".

"Many crimes are committed each year against those who inhabit the slum area of our city."

Hello Drago
Sorry the sentence in the book is what you wrote. I wrote those mistakes.
Thank you so much you explained very well

Does the sentence mean "poor people are criminal"?
Topic: are committed
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 4:05:51 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello Tara.

Firstly I would like to say that the sentence is not good English - I'll note the individual problems at the end.

"Commit" is a very specific verb meaning "do" - but it is only used for crimes.
You do not 'commit a good deed' or 'commit your work' or anything like that.
Only 'commit a crime', 'commit murder', 'commit a theft' etc.

com·mit v.tr.
1. To do, perform, or perpetrate: commit a murder.

American Heritage

**************
On the other parts of the sentence:
"Slum area of our city" is very definite - specifically defined - so it needs a definite article 'the'.

You do not "inhabit in somewhere" - "in" is already included in the meaning of "inhabit".

"Many crimes are committed each year against those who inhabit the slum area of our city."

Hello Drago
Sorry the sentence in the book is what you wrote. I wrote those mistakes.
Thank you so much you explained very well

Does the sentence mean "poor people are criminal"?
Topic: are committed
Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 3:47:50 AM
Hi
What does "committed" mean?
"Many crimes are committed each year against those who inhabit in slum area of our city."
Topic: I took it
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 7:52:00 AM
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Which meaning of "took" is used in the sentence below?
I like to bet on anything that is exciting, so when my friends tried to tempt me with an offer, I took it.


Here, "took" means "accepted." The writer accepted the offer that was given.


Thank you so much

Can you please explain in the text below which usage of "would" is used?
"The idea was for me to spend a frigid December night in a cemetery, all alone, in order to win twenty dollars. Little did I realize that they would use dirty tricks to try to frighten me to abandon the cemetery and, therefore, lose my wager."


The writer is speaking about a series of events in the past. "Last year I didn't realize that if I did A, B would follow."

Compare that to the present: "Now that I'm older I understand that if I do A, B will result."

But only twenty bucks to stay in a cemetery all night??!!

Yes it's only 20 dollars. Maybe it's an old story :D
Thank you so much
Is "would" future in the past?

Yes. It expresses the possibility of something happening at a time in the past. While you were in the cemetery, you did not know your friends would (might/possibly) try to trick you.




Thank you so much Foundit
I appreciate your help
Topic: I took it
Posted: Sunday, May 20, 2018 1:59:03 PM
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Which meaning of "took" is used in the sentence below?
I like to bet on anything that is exciting, so when my friends tried to tempt me with an offer, I took it.


Here, "took" means "accepted." The writer accepted the offer that was given.


Thank you so much

Can you please explain in the text below which usage of "would" is used?
"The idea was for me to spend a frigid December night in a cemetery, all alone, in order to win twenty dollars. Little did I realize that they would use dirty tricks to try to frighten me to abandon the cemetery and, therefore, lose my wager."


The writer is speaking about a series of events in the past. "Last year I didn't realize that if I did A, B would follow."

Compare that to the present: "Now that I'm older I understand that if I do A, B will result."

But only twenty bucks to stay in a cemetery all night??!!

Yes it's only 20 dollars. Maybe it's an old story :D
Thank you so much
Is "would" future in the past?

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