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Profile: cheekyme 🎭
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User Name: cheekyme 🎭
Forum Rank: Newbie
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Sunday, November 5, 2017
Last Visit: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 2:46:46 PM
Number of Posts: 33
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Bank note for banknote
Posted: Sunday, January 5, 2020 2:38:46 AM
"London (CNN) — Nearly 50 million plastic bank notes have had to be replaced since they were launched due to damage and wear, according to PA news agency."

Does it sound unambiguously when we say or write "bank note" meaning "banknote"? I've never seen "bank note" in use before in BrE, but perhaps it's only me.
Topic: Yes, sir.
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 10:57:06 PM
What’s a Portuguese equivalent to the military phrase “Yes, sir!”?
Topic: Deserve for collective nouns
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2019 2:00:09 AM
Our staff deserve ...? (People)

or

Our staff deserves ...? (Everyone)
Topic: Up Yours, Caesar!
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 3:10:23 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
cheekyme 🎭 wrote:
I totally agree, but … weren’t the bloody Viking raids far worse than the Roman rules? Have Britons ever before suffer that much? After Romans arrived, they would often mix with locals, trade etc. Perhaps the underfloor heating was not a thing for the local tribes, but taking dirty water away, since Romans liked cleanness, was quite a beneficial achievement. Anglo-Saxons were just farmers. Up Yours, Caesar! We now have our muddy tracks back?


No the Viking raids were no where near as bloody as the Roman conquest of Britain, in one battle alone the defeat of Boudica it is claimed there were 80,000 dead tribal people no Viking raid came close to that. The Druids were the priestly class of the Brythonic people in Britain and the Romans wiped them out, the Vikings raided churches but never killed every Christian priest in the lands of Britain.


That is true, I guess, but the Vikings would normally show less mercy during their raids, I believe. I am not so sure about sparing women living under vows, but I will look into it. As far as I know, but I may be wrong, the Vikings were not interested in taking prisoners and could be extremely brutal in torturing people.

PS. Druids were not that quick to build roads, were they or places to spend a penny.
Topic: Up Yours, Caesar!
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 2:42:29 AM
taurine wrote:
Maybe it has actually nothing to do with Roman Empire at all. There is a cocktail called a Caesar (or, Bloody Caesar, if you prefer). It contains Worcestershire sauce...

Were I king, I should cut off the nobles for their lands;
And my more having would be as a sauce
To make me hunger more.
-Shakespeare.

A certain Swift wrote a little more mildly while considering a sauce, namely, 'Fine oranges, sauce for your veal,
Are charming when squeezed in a pot of brown ale.'

In the result, the phrase 'Up Yours, Caesar' can be used while raising up a toast drinking a cocktail.


I do like the idea of the toast; perhaps not to wish somebody the best of luck, though. On the other hand, it might be an excellent justification for a good laugh, and to clink glasses of course. Might go well with Caesar salad too, but this Caesar was a Mexican citizen, so maybe not after all.
Topic: Up Yours, Caesar!
Posted: Saturday, October 19, 2019 3:25:06 PM
I totally agree, but … weren’t the bloody Viking raids far worse than the Roman rules? Have Britons ever before suffer that much? After Romans arrived, they would often mix with locals, trade etc. Perhaps the underfloor heating was not a thing for the local tribes, but taking dirty water away, since Romans liked cleanness, was quite a beneficial achievement. Anglo-Saxons were just farmers. Up Yours, Caesar! We now have our muddy tracks back?
Topic: Up Yours, Caesar!
Posted: Saturday, October 19, 2019 2:24:49 PM
I can understand the phrase, but why …? Why would anyone want to bid the Romans such a bitter farewell? Where does this idiom come from? When they left a chaos began ....
Topic: English language games
Posted: Saturday, August 24, 2019 1:18:21 PM
Are there any more games for multiplayers here on the site? I know the WordHub and Spelling Bee. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Topic: Pre-registration vs Pre-Registration ...
Posted: Sunday, August 4, 2019 7:02:22 AM
I have seen on various badges: Pre-Registration (Professional), then name ..., but is it alright to cap R in Registration?
Topic: Penpalling
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 8:54:40 AM
I have a pen pal.

I am:

1. pen palling
2. pen-palling
3. penpalling?