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User Name: arshiaazadi
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Joined: Thursday, September 21, 2017
Last Visit: Sunday, May 27, 2018 4:13:05 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: both
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 1:14:53 PM
Applause
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
I might offer a slightly different answer. Both sentences have useful meaning. The first sentence is most likely the wording you intend. It depends ENTIRELY on context. For example:

A: Have you read either of these?
B: No, I haven't read either of these.
(This person has not read BOOK ONE and has not read BOOK TWO.)


A: I am looking for someone who has read both of these books.
B: Sorry, I haven't read both of these.
(This person may have read BOOK ONE, but not BOOK TWO, or may have read BOOK TWO but not BOOK ONE, but has not read BOTH books.)

The wording of the 2nd sentence is a little awkward, but it is fine, and may be useful in the right conversation.


excellent explanation. Thank you very much.
Topic: both
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 7:08:45 AM
Romany wrote:

Well only the first is correct. The second is phrased confusingly and would not be heard.

Thanks.
Topic: both
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:46:18 AM
Hello all,
Do these sentences have same meaning?
1) I haven't read either of these books.
2) I haven't read both of these books.
Topic: only vs just
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 4:02:10 AM
Hello
Could we replace "only" with "just", please?
The men wore only their pants
Topic: a lot of noise
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 3:22:53 AM
Hello
Is noun countable or uncountable?
What does "late" grammatically is? Is it an adjective?
Late that night, He was woken up by a lot of noise.


Are these sentences same?
1) all of the men and dogs
2) all of the men and the dogs
Topic: he was working
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 3:42:17 AM
FounDit wrote:
arshiaazadi wrote:
Hello all
Which sentence is correct?
1) When he was a boy, he worked from morning until night.
2) When he was a boy, he was working from morning until night.


See this post for some additional information:
tense

Both sentences are good, but we might think of them in two different ways with each word.

Using "worked", we might simply think of some kind of effort that was done during the day, but nothing in particular.

Using "working", we might think of sweating in the sun, or being bundled up in the cold of winter, using a shovel, or some kind of tool, or perhaps herding animals.

What we picture in our minds would be determined by the other words that describe the place or the kind of work. So we "see" the activity with "working", but not with the simple word of "work". This word would just mean something that requires effort.

Thanks a lot.
Topic: he was working
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 5:00:59 AM
Fyfardens wrote:
The progressive (was working) form stresses the ongoing duration of the activity/

I am sorry because I didn't understand could you please explain much?
Topic: he was working
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 4:34:57 AM
Fyfardens wrote:
Both are possible.

Which differences are?
Topic: he was working
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 3:18:46 AM
Hello all
Which sentence is correct?
1) When he was a boy, he worked from morning until night.
2) When he was a boy, he was working from morning until night.
Topic: he said, looking at the picture
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 3:16:29 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello again.

In each of my sentences 1, 1a, 2 and 2a, the phrase 'looking at the picture' acts as an adverbial phrase.

In general it is a 'participle phrase'. It could act as a noun, adverb or adjective in different sentences (though it would be unusual to see it as an adjective, I think - and I would hyphenate it if I ever had to write it - "looking-at-the-picture").

I would say that in 1 and 1a, it is an adverbial phrase of cause.
In 2 and 2a, it seems more like an adverbial phrase of manner.


Thanks a lot.

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