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Profile: arshiaazadi
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User Name: arshiaazadi
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Joined: Thursday, September 21, 2017
Last Visit: Sunday, January 21, 2018 3:18:53 AM
Number of Posts: 79
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: he was working
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 3:18:46 AM
Hello all
Which sentence is correct?
1) When he was a boy, he worked from morning until night.
2) When he was a boy, he was working from morning until night.
Topic: he said, looking at the picture
Posted: Sunday, January 21, 2018 3:16:29 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello again.

In each of my sentences 1, 1a, 2 and 2a, the phrase 'looking at the picture' acts as an adverbial phrase.

In general it is a 'participle phrase'. It could act as a noun, adverb or adjective in different sentences (though it would be unusual to see it as an adjective, I think - and I would hyphenate it if I ever had to write it - "looking-at-the-picture").

I would say that in 1 and 1a, it is an adverbial phrase of cause.
In 2 and 2a, it seems more like an adverbial phrase of manner.


Thanks a lot.
Topic: he said, looking at the picture
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 1:29:55 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Edited to add: Ignore Taurine's inane and idiotic replies. He/she's obviously been drinking - or something.

Hello, arshiaazadi.

One could say that, but changing the phrasing changes the meaning a little.
The phrasings would more normally be:

1) "She was my best friend. I miss her so much" he said, looking at the picture.
1a) Looking at the picture, he said "She was my best friend. I miss her so much."

These give the idea that he looked at the picture and it made him think what a good friend she had been.
Seeing the picture caused the thought.

2) "She was my best friend. I miss her so much" he said, while he was looking at the picture.
2a) "She was my best friend. I miss her so much" he said, as he was looking at the picture.

These say that 'looking' and 'speaking' happened at the same time, but have less connection.
Very little cause-and-effect.

3) "She was my best friend. I miss her so much" he said, and looked at the picture.
This gives me the idea that he thought about her and said he missed her - and thinking of her made him look at the picture.
Thinking of her caused him to look at the picture.

Thanks a lot.
What grammatical function does "looking at the picture" have?
Topic: he said, looking at the picture
Posted: Friday, January 19, 2018 5:26:24 PM
Hello everybody!
Can we say #1 as #2?

1) She was my best friend. I miss her so much" he said, looking at the picture.
2) She was my best friend. I miss her so much" he said, when he was looking at the picture.
Topic: passive or active
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:41:46 AM
Hello all
Is this part "They're closed" passive or active?

The Druid Hills Chick-fil-A store hours are 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and as always, they are closed on Sunday.
Topic: the/ a and past or present
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 11:33:36 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Yes, it's a whole construction.

Jody watched it.

It = the smoke (the object of "watched")

The smoke (it) changed from blue to gray. ("It" is the subject of "changed")

However, we cannot have 'it' being the object of one verb and the subject of another at the same time. - That would make a clause with two finite verbs, which is not allowed.

We can either use an infinitive or a participle. In this sentence they are almost the same in meaning (sometimes they mean different things).

As the smoke reached the blue April sky, Jody watched it change from blue to gray.
As the smoke reached the blue April sky, Jody watched it changing from blue to gray.


Thank you so much for your help
Topic: the/ a and past or present
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:42:08 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello again!

The author is writing about a specific house (in a specific wood).

You could not say "a woods" anyway - because 'woods' is plural or uncountable.

****************
"Change" is not present (or past) - it is the infinitive (base form) of the verb "change".

Thanks a lot.
Ah, I thought "it" is subject and "change" is it's verb. "it" is object for "Jody watched it" and "change" is infinitive, am I right?
Topic: the/ a and past or present
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:36:07 AM
This is part of a story. I want know Why is "the" before "little house" and "woods"? can't it be "a"?
Why verb "change" has the present tense an it I not "past tense"?

There was a thin, straight line of blue smoke coming from the little house in the woods. As the smoke reached the blue April sky, Jody watched it change from blue to gray.
Topic: wait another day
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 6:04:43 AM
Fyfardens wrote:
arshiaazadi wrote:
[
But "the corn could wait" is strange? wait is for people not objects
Is the use of "can" in sentence possible too?


It's not uncommon for us to say that things/situations can wait. I have some letters to write, but they (the letters)/that (the writing) can wait - I am going out to see my girlfriend.

We cannot use 'can' in your original sentence, which is about a past-time situation.

Thank you so much for the helpful responses
Topic: wait another day
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 3:44:07 AM
Fyfardens wrote:


Presumably a farmer had some work to do involving corn. However, it was spring, and the farmer would like to do other things. In his list of things to do, dealing with the corn was not a high priority. He decided to deal with it another day.

Thank you so much.
But "the corn could wait" is strange? wait is for people not objects
Is the use of "can" in sentence possible too?

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