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Profile: onsen
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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Sunday, September 9, 2018 3:47:26 AM
Number of Posts: 214
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: in town
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 9:15:21 PM
Hello,

Quote:
They’ve gone to a concert in town tonight.

go, Macmillan Dictionary


Q1
Is the phrase 'in town' an adjectival phrase or an adverbial phrase?
Q2
Which does the phrase 'in town' modify, the phrase '’ve gone' or the phrase 'a concert'?

My answers:an adjectival phrase, a concert

Thank you
Topic: singer, singing (pronunciation)
Posted: Thursday, August 9, 2018 8:11:42 AM
Thank you very much for the explanations so far.

Oxford Learner's Dictionaries shows the following pronunciation.


Quote:
singer noun
BrE /ˈsɪŋə(r)/; NAmE /ˈsɪŋər/
singer

The pronunciation can be heard as:
BrE /ˈsɪŋgə(r)/; NAmE /ˈsɪŋgər/



Quote:
singing noun
BrE /ˈsɪŋɪŋ/; NAmE /ˈsɪŋɪŋ/
singing

The pronunciation can be heard as:
BrE /ˈsɪŋgɪŋ/; NAmE /ˈsɪŋgɪŋg/



Quote:
sing noun
BrE /sɪŋ/; NAmE /sɪŋ/
sing

The pronunciation can be heard as:
BrE /sɪŋ/; NAmE /sɪŋg/

Topic: singer, singing (pronunciation)
Posted: Sunday, July 29, 2018 11:37:08 AM
Hello,

Quote:
singer /ˈsɪŋə/
n

singing /ˈsɪŋɪŋ/
n

(Longman Exams Dictionary)


The pronunciation symbol /g/ is not used in either 'singer' or 'singing'.
Is it wrong to pronounce them as /ˈsɪŋgə/ and /ˈsɪŋgɪŋ/?

Thank you



Topic: leave out
Posted: Saturday, July 28, 2018 2:35:23 AM
BobShilling wrote:
onsen wrote:
[quote=palapaguy] Breakfast was provided every day and the wife of the host said to me "Leave out".


Those words mean nothing to me.


Sorry, BobShilling.
I’ll rephrase and add some context as follows.

Breakfast was provided every day. As breakfast drew near to an end or ended, the wife of the host said to me, "Leave out", in a calm manner. The tone of the phrase sounded as if saying "Don’t bother about the things after the breakfast, (i.e., clear the table, etc.)."
Topic: leave out
Posted: Saturday, July 28, 2018 12:23:56 AM
palapaguy wrote:
Context, please. I don't see how "leave out" relates to "table" or "end of the meal."


Thank you very much, palapaguy.

I ever made a shortstay at a private dwelling house in Oxford. Breakfast was provided every day and the wife of the host said to me "Leave out". I took it then as meaning to leave the things (the plates, spoons and food, etc.) as they were, though I couldn't understand the 'out'. I don’t think I misheard.
Topic: leave out
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 10:27:18 PM
Hello,

Is the phrase 'leave out' used at the table, particularly near or at the end of the meal?
What does it mean?
I looked up the dictionary, but couldn’t find the proper meaning.

Thank you
Topic: the meaning(s) of words, the life/lives of spies
Posted: Wednesday, July 25, 2018 5:56:19 AM
Hello,

Quote:
A. A dictionary explains the meaning of words.

B. This dictionary gives the meanings of words and also illustrates the constructions they can be used in.
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

Quote:
C. A Curtain Lifts on the Life of Spies
The Washington Post

D. The president’s apparent disclosure of classified and highly sensitive information to the Russian Foreign Minister and Ambassador is a serious act. An intelligence breach always puts the lives of spies at risk.
BROOKINGS


Q1
A and B have, roughly speaking, almost the same context. In A, the noun 'meaning' is in the singular while in B it is in the plural. Where does this difference come from?

Q2
In C, why is the phrase 'the life of spies' in the singular, but not 'the lives of spies' in the plural?
In D, can the phrase 'the lives of spies' be replaced with the phrase 'the life of spies'?

Thank you
Topic: a drink of water
Posted: Sunday, July 22, 2018 10:30:16 AM
Hello,

Quote:
A.
drink n
13. a swallow or draft of liquid: a drink of water.
(Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)

B.
drink n.
3. used as a countable noun
A drink is an amount of liquid that you drink.
I asked her for a drink of water.
(Collins COBUILD English Usage)

C.
drink noun
1. (an act of drinking) a liquid suitable for swallowing.
He had/took a drink of water;
(Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary)

drink


A and B define the noun 'drink' as a material, i.e., a swallow or draft of liquid, an amount of liquid, respectively.
C defines it as an act of drinking with parentheses.

The way A and B define it is different from that C does.

Please explain the difference with respect to their definitions.

Thank you
Topic: a transient trade
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 7:41:55 AM
Hello,

Quote:
transient adj. FLEETING; QUICKLY PASSING AWAY; STAYING FOR A SHORT TIME.
This hotel caters to a transient trade because it is near a busy highway.
(from BASIC WORD LIST, BARRON’S)


Q1
What does the phrase 'a transient trade' in the example sentence mean?
Does the 'trade' mean the following?

Quote:
trade
n.
3. The people working in or associated with a business or industry:
writers, editors, and other members of the publishing trade.
trade.


Q2
Do 'transient trade' and 'permanent profession' make a pair?
Transient trade or permanent profession.

Thank you
Topic: get started
Posted: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 10:43:43 AM
Hello,

Quote:
get started
to begin doing something
It's nearly ten o'clock. Let's get started.

get started


Is the 'started' in the phrase 'get started' transitive or intransitive?
I suppose it is intransitive.

Thank you

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