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Profile: onsen
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User Name: onsen
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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Thursday, November 21, 2019 7:38:11 AM
Number of Posts: 522
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Newton was / is buried at Westminster Abbey.
Posted: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 8:46:50 PM
Hello,

1.
A. Newton was buried at Westminster Abbey.…………………………a fact in the past

B. Newton is buried at Westminster Abbey.……………………………the corresponding fact at the present

2.
C. Mr Smith was accused.…………………………………………………………a fact in the past

D. Mr Smith is accused.……………………………………………………………the corresponding fact at the present
or Mr Smith is being accused.

3.
E. The cup was placed on the table.…………………………………………a fact in the past

F. The cup is placed on the table.……………………………………………the corresponding fact at the present
or The cup is being placed on the table.

(self-made sentence)

I suppose D and F are wrong.
Please correct them.


Thank you.

Topic: He did something wrong.
Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 4:12:17 AM
Hello,

He did something wrong.
(self-made sentence)

Can the 'wrong' in the sentence be interpreted in two ways?
That is, one is as an adjective modifying 'something', the other is as an adverb modifying 'did'.


Thank you.
Topic: education vs. an education
Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 10:56:10 PM
Hello,

Quote:

(question)
education vs an education
(A. An education B. Education) is necessary for you to get a good job.
Which one should I choose to complete the above sentence? Thank you a lot.

(answer)
Re: education vs an education
"An education is necessary..."
Best,
In Perfect English

https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/190404-education-vs-an-education
(question) and (answer) added.



Did the answerer mean by the 'An education' a particular type of education?
A particular type of education may mean one of all sorts of education at from high levels to low levels or in between.
What is the meaning of the answer by the answerer?


Thank you.
Topic: The Sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 9:24:18 AM
Hello,

Quote:

The Sun rises in the east and sets in the west.
(LONGMAN Exams Dictionary)


Is the sentence based on an optical illusion?


Thank you.
Topic: As I was walking my dog, ...
Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2019 2:07:20 AM
Hello,

As I was walking my dog, the leash (or lead) came off the dog’s neck accidentally.
The way the dog was collared might have been wrong.
(self-made sentence)

1. Please correct the sentences.

2. Does the sentence using 'came off' seem to convey the idea of the leash moving from its predetermined place to another place, i.e. from around the neck to the ground?
(This idea can be applied to the loose knob on an old door or a loose button on a shirt. One day they'll come apart. They are not like an apple falling from a tree.)

3. Will 'dropped from' work in place of 'came off'?


Thank you.
Topic: He did it to be spiteful.
Posted: Tuesday, November 12, 2019 8:36:13 AM
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
He did it BECAUSE he was spiteful.


Thank you very much, Wilmar (USA), for your reply.

Does the 'to be spiteful' mean 'because he was spiteful'?
Topic: He did it to be spiteful.
Posted: Tuesday, November 12, 2019 8:07:24 AM
Hello,

Quote:

malice n. unfriendly feelings;
He did it out of malice = He did it to be spiteful.
(Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)


What does the phrase 'to be spiteful' mean?

Is it one of the following?
1. He did it in order to be spiteful.
2. He did it for him to be spiteful.
3. He did it so as to be spiteful.


Thank you.
Topic: A football ground is a ground.
Posted: Sunday, November 10, 2019 4:01:56 AM
Hello,

A football ground is a ground.
(self-made sentence)

Is the above sentence correct?


Thank you.
Topic: , I suppose.
Posted: Saturday, November 9, 2019 6:57:39 AM
sureshot wrote:

The phrase"I suppose" can be used to convey a variety of senses. It is commonly used to say that you think that something is probably true, although you wish it was not and hope someone will tell you it is not. The speaker of the given sentence is reluctant to accept this probability as true since he/she does not really want to walk home.

I hope it helps in understanding the phrase.



Thank you very much, sureshot, for your reply.

I thought that the phrase "I suppose" meant or was related to 'indecisiveness' which is connected with the 'probable' in the definition. 'Indecisiveness' is apt to be connected with 'reluctance'.

Is my idea wrong?
Topic: , I suppose.
Posted: Saturday, November 9, 2019 4:12:28 AM
Hello,

Quote:

suppose v 1 to think, believe or assume that sth is true or probable:
We’ll have to walk home, I suppose (ie showing reluctance).
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)


The definition doesn’t say anything about 'reluctance'.
Where does the 'showing reluctance' come from in the example sentence?


Thank you.

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