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Profile: onsen
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User Name: onsen
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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Saturday, May 26, 2018 2:00:50 AM
Number of Posts: 180
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: the hierarchy in companies
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 5:42:59 AM
Hello, thar, srirr and Jyrkkä Jätkä.

I get your drift.
Topic: I think the Earth orbits the Sun ...
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 7:46:45 PM
Hello,

A. I think the Earth orbits the Sun because of the gravitational force.
(self-made sentence)
My question:
How does one compose an interrogative sentence so that the phrase 'because of the gravitational force' is the answer?

My try:
B. Why do you think the Earth orbits the Sun?
This sentence could be answered in such a way as:
Because I learned that way at school.
Is there any way of asking so as to avoid such an answer?

Thank you
Topic: the hierarchy in companies
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 5:18:17 PM
Thank you very much, thar.

thar wrote:
Who do you value in the company - the ones who sit behind desks and make decision? Or the ones who deal with customers who make the company its money?

I value all of those who work in the company.


thar wrote:
CKC is pointing out the social meaning of the word, when you apply it to people - would you like to be labelled an unimportant person - that you have no value? No, nobody likes that!

Does 'less important' mean 'unimportant', or 'no value'?
Doesn’t 'less important' fall into the category of 'important'?
The 'less' merely shows the degree of the adjective 'important'.
The second definition exactly applies.


thar wrote:
Companies that consider their workers as unimportant people will be companies where the workers hate their bosses. Whistle

Again, 'less important' doesn’t mean 'unimportant'.
Topic: the hierarchy in companies
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 8:59:22 AM
ChrisKC wrote:
These days, we have "political correctness" and whether rank and file can be considered "less important" is open to question


Thank you very much, ChrisKC.

According to the dictionary, I don’t think there’s any question about my use of the phrase 'less important'.

Quote:
important adjective
1. having a great effect on people or things; of great value
2. (of a person) having great influence or authority
Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries.

Topic: the hierarchy in companies
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 5:08:27 AM
Hello,

About the hierarchy in companies:

Quote:
Those important………………………………………Those less important

the leaders………………………………………………the rank and file
the officers
the leadership
from TFD

a director……………………………………………………a worker
a chief executive………………………………………an employee
a manager…………………………………………………a member of staff/staff member
a boss
from Longman Language Activator


Q1:
As far as I looked up in TFD, I found three words which describe those important. Are there any other words which correspond to the three, concerning those less important other than 'the rank and file'?

Q2:
Are there any adjectives or nouns which describe those important or those less important each as a whole?

Thank you
Topic: what money, what little time
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 9:35:18 AM
Romany wrote:
Onsen - when it's a countable noun we tend to use "what few": "What few coins she had in her purse she handed to the homeless person."

The use of "little" is to underline the fact that
a) what was given was not very much
b) though it may not have been much, it was generous considering how little there was to give.

Working parents, for example, may only have a few hours for leisure, but instead of spending them on the golf course, or going out with their own friends, those precious free hours are mainly spent doing things as a family.


Thank you very much, Romany, for your detailed explanation, Working parents,... in particular.
Topic: what money, what little time
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 9:07:14 AM
Hello,

Quote:
A. She gave him what money she had (=all the money she had, although she did not have much).
Longman

B. I spent what little time I had with my family.
Oxford Learner's Dictionaries


Q1:
Is this construction (what + uncountable nouns (e.g. money, time)) applied to countable nouns?

Q2:
In Sentence B, can the 'little' be omitted?

Thank you
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 1:16:20 AM
pageant
Topic: seeking advice
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 11:46:18 PM
Hello,

Daughter:
A. I think I’m going to go out with him, now and from now on.
Mother:
B. I agree with you as long as you and he like each other.
(self-made sentence)

Sentence A doesn’t seek advice explicitly. How does one reword or rephrase the sentence so that her idea of seeking some advice can be conveyed to her mother?

PS
The way of saying i.e., tone, may play an important role in this case.

Thank you
Topic: What he says is trustworthy.
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 5:27:09 PM
I hit on the sentence which I was seeking.

What he says is not entirely trusted.

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