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Profile: onsen
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User Name: onsen
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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Saturday, July 13, 2019 9:29:52 PM
Number of Posts: 420
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: He was the first of four sons who survived infancy.
Posted: Friday, July 12, 2019 6:56:53 AM
Hello,

Quote:

John Calvin was born as Jehan Cauvin on 10 July 1509, in the town of Noyon in the Picardy region of France. He was the first of four sons who survived infancy.
John Calvin


Q1.
Does the latter sentence imply that Calvin’s family had more than four sons in all, including those who didn’t survive infancy.

Q2.
What does the sentence mean if a comma is added like the following?

He was the first of four sons, who survived infancy.


Thank you.
Topic: a well-used ballpoint pen
Posted: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 10:05:50 AM
towan52 wrote:
It's goin' 'ome, innit!


Yes, let's call it a day.
Topic: a well-used ballpoint pen
Posted: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 9:33:36 AM
Thank you very much, pjharvey, thar and NancyUK, for your replies.

The word 'work' is a hard worker.
Topic: a well-used ballpoint pen
Posted: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 6:07:40 AM
Hello,

Any ballpoint pen will be useless sooner or later.

Q1.
How does one express the situation of the pen the moment when it has used up the last drop?
That is, the transition from the state of the pen being able to write to that not being able to.

My try (just to make the matter clear):
The ballpoint pen has become not able to write (or work).

Q2.
Seeing someone about to touch the same pen as above and try to use it, what is the usual expression used to convey the idea that the pen is already useless?

My try (just to make the matter clear):
That ballpoint pen doesn’t (or won’t) write (or work) anymore.


Thank you.
Topic: not ... so much as
Posted: Monday, July 8, 2019 11:00:45 AM
Thank you very much, Drag0nspeaker and NKM, for your replies.

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello Onsen.

Yes - it makes sense.

The patient used to eat three large meals a day - and five snacks.

"I don’t eat so much as I used to" means only two large meals, two small ones and three snacks!

I believe there is a convention that in positive sentences one uses "as much as" and in negative ones, one uses "so much as".
I don't think I ever learned that at school, as a RULE, but it sounds good.

I eat as much as I used to.
I don't eat so much as I used to.




NKM wrote:

I think that, at least in American English, "as much as" is the general rule for both positive and negative constructions. We tend to reserve "so much" for use when the comparison is implied, figurative or idiomatic.

 "I don't eat as much as I used to."
 "I don't eat so much anymore."
 "He left without so much as a nod or a word of thanks."



Quote:

not/without so much as something used when you are surprised or annoyed that someone did not do something:
They left without so much as saying goodbye.
He’d received not so much as a thank you from Tiffany.

not/without so much as something, Longman



I noticed the following.

"He left without so much as a nod or a word of thanks."
is similar to an example sentence from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.
The sentence is:
They left without so much as saying goodbye.

LDOCE explains 'not/without so much as something' as (as underlined above) 'used when you are surprised or annoyed that someone did not do something:'.

My thread this time is based on this underlined explanation.

My question:
Does the sentence 'I don’t eat so much as I used to.' have anything to do with the explanation?






Topic: not ... so much as
Posted: Monday, July 8, 2019 4:34:31 AM
Hello,

Doctor: Your blood sugar level is fairly high. Do you eat much?
Patient: No, I don’t eat so (or as) much as I used to.
D: OK.
(self-made conversation)

Does what Patient said make sense?


Thank you.
Topic: Catches of Scottish salmon have declined significantly.
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2019 4:51:34 AM
Thank you very much, jacobusmaximus and thar, for your replies.

I revised sentence C.

Scottish salmon have been caught in significantly declining (or decreasing) numbers.

Is it correct?
Topic: Catches of Scottish salmon have declined significantly.
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2019 3:07:35 AM
Hello,

Quote:
A. Catches of Scottish salmon have declined significantly.
catch


I’d like to start sentences with 'Scottish salmon' as the subject.

My tries:
B. Scottish salmon have declined significantly in catches.
C. Scottish salmon have not been caught significantly.
D. Scottish salmon have not been caught as abundantly as former times significantly.

1. Please correct B, C and D.
2. Please show an example sentence using the word 'much'.


Thank you.
Topic: families on a low income / families on low incomes
Posted: Saturday, July 6, 2019 9:04:00 AM
Hello,

Quote:
Many families on a low income are dependent on state support.
income

Families on low incomes are eligible for state benefits.
income



How does one use the phrases 'families on a low income' and 'families on low incomes' properly?


Thank you.
Topic: conjunctions and adverbs
Posted: Friday, July 5, 2019 8:18:12 AM
Peacewise wrote:
Your formal example is adequate, though it could be more formalized:
"As Mt. X is steep, it is thus dangerous to climb. Therefore be careful not to be involved in a slip accident."

Reformatting the conjoiners doesn't strictly determine formality, (nor are there predominately popular usage structures,) while cadence and affectation are more significant in this regard. You could have as colloquial usage:

Dad: "Mt. X is steep and it is dangerous to climb. So be careful not to be involved in a slip accident."

However other parts of the sentence structuring here still feel too stiff and particular to be colloquial. Better usage would be:

Dad: "You know that Mt. X is steep, which makes it dangerous to climb. Be careful not to slip and have an accident."

As you can see, here part C has its conjoiner eschewed entirely, along with the vernacularly awkward use of the adjective "involved." Generally the shorter and fewer you use conjunctions or adverbs, the more colloquial or vernacular the resulting sentence will sound.


Thank you very much, Peacewise, for your detailed explanation.

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