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Profile: onsen
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User Name: onsen
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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Saturday, November 17, 2018 5:02:34 PM
Number of Posts: 238
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The enemy in its revenge ...
Posted: Saturday, November 17, 2018 4:52:20 AM
Hello,

Quote:
The enemy in its revenge tried to annihilate the entire population.
(Basic Word List, Barron’s)


What does the 'in' in the sentence mean?
Does it mean 7 or 9?

Quote:
in
prep.
7. With the aim or purpose of: followed in pursuit.

in
prep
9. used to indicate goal or purpose: in honour of the president.

in.


Thank you.
Topic: I wouldn't doubt someone
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 8:08:18 AM
Hello,

Quote:
I wouldn't doubt someone Irish I would expect nothing else from someone
doubt, Collins English Dictionary.



Please explain why the sentence in bold means 'I would expect nothing else from someone'. And why it uses the word 'someone', but not 'anyone'.

Thank you.
Topic: If I understand the implications of ...
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 6:09:59 PM
Hello,

Quote:
If I understand the implications of your remark, you do not trust our captain.
(Basic Word List, Barron’s)


If you are to add some phrase between 'remark' and 'you', what phrase will be adequate?
What I think of is 'I will assume'.


Thank you.

Topic: 2 interrogative sentences
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 7:46:25 AM
Hello,

Quote:
A. The 1970s saw the beginnings of a new technological revolution, based on microelectronics.
(Longman Language Activator)

B. I saw them playing baseball with classmates of another school.
(self-made sentence)


How does one make interrogative sentences so that the answers the questioner expects are the 'microelectronics' and 'classmates of another school' in the given sentences, respectively?

My try.
For A:
Based on what did the 1970s see the beginnings of a new technological revolution?
For B:
Who did you see them playing baseball with?

Thank you.


Topic: speak and talk
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 9:20:58 PM
Romany wrote:
However, they seem to be happy and don't bother anyone, so the rest of us just ignore her/his posts.


Definitely!Applause Applause

Topic: speak and talk
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 8:28:10 PM
renee talley wrote:
Aa person who has a speech impaired speech wasn't born this case and 1 dr. left the medication
too long speak too fast sounds like greek to someone but when a person's mouth is moist and talks slow
most of the time can be understood. To have only one ear to hear from and even a hearing aid can be spoken and talked to
is very lucky even if their perception from what direction the person finally locates the direction the person
voice is coming from in this case to be spoken to thoroughly doesn't feel left out of the conversationApplause Applause Applause Applause


Would you please rewrite all the thing so that people can understand what you mean?
Topic: speak and talk
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 6:24:16 PM
Hello,

Quote:
People who cannot speak can talk by using signs.
(Longman Dictionary of American English)


I pay attention to the combination of the words 'speak' and 'talk' in the sentence.
Other combinations are possible, though in theory.
They are as follows, including the original one.
A. speak……talk
B. speak……speak
C. talk………speak
D. talk………talk
Why did the writer choose the combination A from among A, B, C and D?

Thank you.
Topic: feel confidence / feel hunger
Posted: Saturday, November 3, 2018 11:04:12 PM
Hello,

Quote:
A. I feel confident.
B. I feel confidence.

C. I feel hungry.
D. I feel hunger.


I come across sentences which have the phrase 'feel confident' or the phrase 'feel hungry'.
But I haven’t come across sentences which have the phrase 'feel confidence' or the phrase 'feel hunger'.
Are they problematic in terms of collocation?


Thank you
Topic: an extrovert who likes ... / an extrovert, who likes ...
Posted: Friday, November 2, 2018 9:26:12 AM
Hello,

Quote:
extrovert N. person interested mostly in external objects and actions.
A good salesman is usually an extrovert who likes to mingle with people.
(Basic Word List, 1997 edition)

extrovert N. person interested mostly in external objects and actions.
A good salesman is usually an extrovert, who likes to mingle with people.
(Basic Word List, 2012 edition)


Why is a comma (in red) added after the word 'extrovert' in the 2012 edition?

In what respects is the 1997 edition wrong?


Thank you
Topic: a crash of thunder / the crash of breaking glass
Posted: Wednesday, October 31, 2018 8:24:25 PM
Hello,

Quote:
crash n 2 a sudden loud noise as made by a violent fall, break, etc.:
a crash of thunder / the crash of breaking glass.
(Longman Dictionary of American English)


a crash of thunder: with an indefinite article
the crash of breaking glass: with a definite article

What is the reason why the phrase 'the crash of breaking glass', but not the phrase 'a crash of breaking glass' is used in the dictionary, when the latter phrase is possible?

Thank you

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