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User Name: maltliquor87
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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Thursday, June 21, 2018 4:27:02 AM
Number of Posts: 70
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Topic: (So indignant I am) VS (Being so indignant that I am)
Posted: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 5:39:36 AM
Thank you for your comments.

I agree with Drag0nspeaker. What is grammatically correct does not always sound right. I'm interested in those constructions to better understand the English language. I think I will rarely, if ever, use them in my own speech.
Topic: (So indignant I am) VS (Being so indignant that I am)
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 3:09:27 PM
I see that the two sentences have different meanings. And I know that the "adj+as+(I am)" clause can mean "even though", as NKM pointed out. But here's an interesting thing. Consider the following sentence written by Canadian author J.Peterson

Quote:
It would be more romantic to suggest that we would have all jumped at the chance for something more productive, bored out of our skulls as we were


In this sentence the part in bold means "we were so bored that we would have jumped at the chance for something more productive". It does not mean "even though ...". I guess it might as well be rewritten thus:

Quote:
It would be more romantic to suggest that we would have all jumped at the chance for something more productive, so bored out of our skulls were we
Topic: (So indignant I am) VS (Being so indignant that I am)
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 5:11:20 AM
Thanks, Drag0nspeaker
Topic: (So indignant I am) VS (Being so indignant that I am)
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 3:29:50 AM
Hello dear forum members!

Could you, please, tell me whether the following short sentences are grammatically correct?

1)
Quote:
Frankly, I don't want to write about her so indignant I am.


Relying on my intuitive sense, I would rewrite it as such.

2)
Quote:
Frankly, I don't want to write about her, being so indignant that I am.


Or even (if we can sacrifice "frankly")

3)
Quote:
Being so indignant that I am, I don't want to write about her



Topic: "They weren't clearing me so much as they were..."
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 5:26:27 PM
LeonAzul, thanks again.

Yes, I noticed it.
Topic: "They weren't clearing me so much as they were..."
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 3:51:33 PM
Thanks! You are awesome guys
Topic: "They weren't clearing me so much as they were..."
Posted: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 1:19:35 PM
Thank you all for your responses.

I see FounDit's point, and I am thankful for that, but it does not completely address my question. Can "so much" and "as" be placed next to each other in the Shermer's sentence like in the following quote?

Quote:
It's not that scientists are trained to avoid these biases so much as it is that science itself is designed to force you to ferret out your errors and prejudices


And here's his original sentence just for comparison:

Quote:
It's not so much that scientists are trained to avoid these biases as it is that science itself is designed to force you to ferret out your errors and prejudices


I'm asking because leonAzul commented that "so much" and "as" are better placed together, as we saw with my previous sentences. I want to undersand if this suggestion applies to sentences across the board or it can disregarded for some other sentences like the one that Shermer wrote.
Topic: "They weren't clearing me so much as they were..."
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 8:27:52 AM
Today I came across a sentence written by Michael Shermer, who is a prolific writer and the creator of Skeptic Magazine. Here's his sentence verbatim:

Quote:
It's not so much that scientists are trained to avoid these biases as it is that science itself is designed to force you to ferret out your errors and prejudices


I noticed that "so much" and "as" were separated in Shermer's sentence. Shortly after, I managed to find those two sentences, which I had seen before, and in those sentences "so much" and "as" were closer together, as we just saw. The next question that springs to mind is whether in Shermer's sentence "so much" and "as" can be placed closer together.
Topic: "They weren't clearing me so much as they were..."
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 7:39:47 AM
Hello!

I'm wondering whether it is grammatically correct to change the position of "so much" in the first set of sentences so that this construction is placed as in the second set of sentences. I'd like to hear your opinions.

The sentences in the first set are taken from native speakers' writings. The second set contains just my own tweaks.

1)
Quote:
I wondered if my investigators weren't clearing me so much as they were shoring up that bylaw


Quote:
It hasn't watered anything down so much as muddied the waters


2)
Quote:
I wondered if my investigators weren't so much clearing me as they were shoring up that bylaw


Quote:
It hasn't so much watered anything down as muddied the waters


I'm looking forward to your responses.
Topic: (dehumanized VS dehumanizing) reality
Posted: Monday, June 4, 2018 11:30:45 AM
Thanks!

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