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User Name: maltliquor87
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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 4:24:51 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: An example with the verb 'proclaim'
Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 5:36:26 AM
Helenej and Lotje1000, thanks for further sparking my interest in this particular use of 'proclaim'. It also helps me better rememeber all this information.
Topic: An example with the verb 'proclaim'
Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 5:32:22 AM
It initially escaped my attention, but I've just found that oxfordlearnersdictionariesdoes list the pattern "proclaim someone to have something".

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/proclaim

Quote:
2. to show something clearly; to be a sign of something
proclaim something This building, more than any other, proclaims the character of the town.
proclaim somebody/something + noun His accent proclaimed him a Scot.
proclaim somebody/something to be/have something His accent proclaimed him to be a Scot.
Topic: An example with the verb 'proclaim'
Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 4:02:39 AM
Thanks, pjharvey.
Topic: An example with the verb 'proclaim'
Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 2:11:20 AM
Hi, dear forum members.

I'd like to know whether the following sentence sounds natural to you. It's written by a non-native speaker whose English is nevertheless good.

Quote:
She was completely, indeed sinisterly, devoid of all those qualities which her face and body externally proclaimed her to have – pensiveness, grace, warmth, agility, beauty.


Shouldn't the part in bold be rewritten as "proclaimed (that) she had"?
Topic: bear fruit
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 12:45:19 PM
Thanks, Thar!
Everything is crystal-clear. I assume that one would be hard-pressed to hear the phrase "he/she will bear fruit" used by native speakers in any context. I'll steer clear of it. Not that I ever wanted to use it. I just heard a Russian guy say it when he almost certainly meant to say "their effort will bear fruit", meaning "their result will be satisfying for them".



Topic: bear fruit
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 12:33:51 PM
So if a person works hard to achieve their goals, we could say "your effort will bear fruit" in order to encourage him or her. But the phrase "you'll bear fruit" would sound odd.
Topic: bear fruit
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 12:28:25 PM
Thanks, Drago!
Topic: bear fruit
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 12:07:02 PM
Hello, dear forum members.

Is it correct to say that the sentence "he/she will bear fruit" does not mean that the person will be rewarded for their effort? In other words, the sentence
"he/she will bear fruit" does not convey the idea of the sentence "his/her effort (or plans, actions, etc) will bear fruit". The original sentence sounds to me as if the person will be used for someone's gain instead of being rewarded.

Could you comment on that, please?
Topic: the definite article in a sentence
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 6:39:28 AM
That's clear. Thanks!
Topic: the definite article in a sentence
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 6:20:00 AM
Thar, thanks a lot.

But in the original sentence the author wrote "the rape gangs he didn't organize". He's implying that the nominee Brett Kavanaugh is mistakenly accused of organizing rape gangs.

Does the "didn't" part change anything?

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