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Profile: maltliquor87
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User Name: maltliquor87
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 12:52:16 AM
Number of Posts: 218
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: "you're never going to have tried a similar product at this price"
Posted: Monday, July 1, 2019 5:14:46 AM
Thanks guys!

I guess the phrase is not an example of good English to be emulated in similar contexts.
Topic: "you're never going to have tried a similar product at this price"
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2019 12:18:16 PM
Hello!

Today I caught a glimpse of a youtube commercial in which the presenter with American accent made a pitch along the following lines:

'Have you ever tried something similar? Maybe. But you're never going to have tried a similar product at this price'.

The part in bold is written verbatim. As far as I understand, it can be rephrased as "it's very unlikely that you've ever tried" without any significant loss of meaning. But the original turn of phrase still seems interesting.

Could you please comment on whether this "you're never going to have tried" sounds like natural English to you?

Topic: "I'll get that cleaned up lickety-split"
Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2019 11:17:57 PM
Spasibo, NKM.
Topic: "I'll get that cleaned up lickety-split"
Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2019 4:25:24 PM
Thank you, Drago!
Topic: "I'll get that cleaned up lickety-split"
Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2019 1:47:19 PM
Thanks, thar!
Topic: "I'll get that cleaned up lickety-split"
Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2019 11:44:59 AM
Hello!

While googling the expression "lickety-split" I came across the following short clip from a movie titled Joe Dirt: link to the clip. The clip is only two seconds long.

Here's what the clip captures in case you don't want to click on the link. A man holding what looks like a mop tells a pretty woman that he'll get it cleaned up lickety-split.

I have no additional context, unfortunately.

I'd like to know what this "to get that cleaned up" could mean. One straightforward explanation is that he could be implying that he'll have someone else do it. I'm not sure about that because he himself is holding what seems to be a mop. Is it also possible that this construction is being used to emphasize the completion of the action, like "he'll get it over with lickety-split"?


I'd be glad to read your comments on that.
Topic: "The kids are all fight"
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2019 2:59:56 AM
Spasibo, thar
Topic: "The kids are all fight"
Posted: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 1:14:50 PM
Interesting. Thanks, Sarrriesfan.
Topic: "The kids are all fight"
Posted: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 1:00:33 PM
Thanks, palapaguy!
Topic: "The kids are all fight"
Posted: Wednesday, June 19, 2019 12:43:02 PM
Hello!

One of the Simpsons episodes is titled "The kids are all fight". Recently I heard a native speaker use this phrase, so it seems to have caught on among some people. I've been wondering what is with the grammar of this sentence. I'd expect it to be constructed this way: 'All the kids fight'. Is the sentence in question deliberately ungrammatical? Or is it a grammatically correct sentence similar to "they are all bark (and no bite)"?

Could you share your thoughts on that, please?

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