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User Name: maltliquor87
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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Friday, November 22, 2019 2:47:29 AM
Number of Posts: 258
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Unlearning misconception
Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2019 3:35:16 PM
Thanks to all of you.

The meaning of "training something away" is completely unambiguous. The reason why it may grate on people's ears is that the wording is unfamiliar, although one can easily recall expressions that are similar in structure.

Quote:
Don't leave me here with these tears
Come and kiss this pain away

Toni Braxton - Un-Break My Heart


Quote:
"Pray the Gay Away?" is a 2011 episode of the American television series Our America with Lisa Ling. The episode, hosted by Ling, profiles several people as they seek to reconcile their homosexuality with their Christianity. It originally aired on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network on March 8, 2011.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pray_the_Gay_Away%3F


I'm not going to use this expression in the foreseeable future. For the time being, I can only hope that it starts to catch on among native speakers :)




Topic: Unlearning misconception
Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2019 3:29:26 AM
Hello!

While reading a blog post by a scientist from The Netherlands, I came across an interesting expression, which is 'train away misconceptions'. Below is the relevant excerpt.

Quote:
When I made my first MOOC three years ago I spent some time thinking about how to explain what a p-value is clearly (you can see my video here). Some years later I realized that if you want to prevent misunderstandings of p-values, you should also explicitly train people about what p-values are not. Now, I think that training away misconceptions is just as important as explaining the correct interpretation of a p-value.
http://daniellakens.blogspot.com/2019/09/improving-education-about-p-values.html?m=1


I liked this expression, but after googling it I found out that it is used very rarely according to Google results. Does it sound natural to you? Could you suggest other collocations with this word that mean 'unlearning misconceptions'?
Topic: know something from a hole in the ground
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 8:55:53 AM
Sorry. I didn't mean any harm. Had I known that my post would provoke strong reactions, I would have either sanitized it or not published it at all.

The language is crude but some people say it, especially in movies. I've heard utterances that are much worse. When I see such examples in dictionaries, I look at them dispassionately since it's not directed at a particular person.
Topic: know something from a hole in the ground
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 4:25:37 AM
This is a play on words.

The original expression is 'not know your ass from a hole in the ground'.

Quote:
not know one’s ass from a hole in the ground
tv. not to be knowledgeable; not to be alert and effective. (Usually objectionable.) That stupid son of a bitch doesn’t know his ass from a hole in the ground.
https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/not+know+your+ass+from+a+hole+in+the+ground
Topic: "How long does it take you to do/finish your homework"
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 2:24:15 AM
Thank you, Wilmar.
Topic: "How long does it take you to do/finish your homework"
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2019 2:52:09 PM
Thanks.
Topic: "How long does it take you to do/finish your homework"
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2019 12:59:31 PM
Hello everyone!

Could someone please tell me which sentences sound natural.

1a) How long did it take you to do your homework?
1b) How long did it take you to finish your homework?

2a) How long did it take you to read this book?
2b) How long did it take you to finish this book?

If all of them sound ok, then I will have a follow-up question. Do the sentences in the pairs mean the same when by 'finish' we mean finishing the action denoted by the corresponding verb in each given pair?
Topic: verbs & for X years
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2019 11:36:20 AM
Thanks, FounDit.
Topic: verbs & for X years
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2019 8:09:32 AM
Sorry for pitching in. One quick question.
Is it true that the sentence below sounds ok?
She's been writing a novel for two years (the action is ongoing).

I'm asking this question in order to juxtapose "She's been writing a novel for two years" and "She's written a novel for two years".

Topic: in the years after vs for several years since
Posted: Saturday, October 19, 2019 4:44:27 PM
Thanks, Wilmar.

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