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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Friday, May 24, 2019 12:23:17 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: pass the cost along to someone/ pass the cost on to someone
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2019 12:21:39 PM
Thanks, FounDit!
Topic: pass the cost along to someone/ pass the cost on to someone
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2019 11:10:57 AM
pjharvey, thanks. I think, however, that dealing with such questions is best left to native speakers. So I hope this thread isn't over until a native speaker sings.

After some digging around I've found this:
Quote:
pass sth on/along to sb
COMMERCE if a company passes higher or lower costs on to its customers, it raises or reduces prices :

The car industry is too competitive to pass higher costs along to customers.
The lack of branches means financial companies are able to pass on significant cost savings to their customers.
It's from https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/pass-sth-on-along-to-sb
.

On the other hand, few, if any, other dictionaries make it explicit that "pass on to" can be synonymous with "pass along to".

Topic: pass the cost along to someone/ pass the cost on to someone
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2019 9:07:53 AM
Hello!

I'd like to replace the participle "on" with the participle "along" in the following sentence to see whether the meaning changes.

a)
Quote:
The retailer is forced to pass these extra costs on to the customer.
This sentence is from https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/pass-on


Would the sentence mean something different if we were to use the participle "along" instead?
Topic: What's the word here?
Posted: Sunday, May 5, 2019 4:03:36 PM
All I heard was "getchy". Interestingly enough, I immediately thought that "getchy" didn't make sense and it should have been "sketchy" instead. At least sketchy is an established word unlike "getchy", though they would sound somewhat similar. I decided to wait for native speakers to answer this question since they are better qualified to transcribe such ambiguous speech. I'm relieved that my interpretation was close to those of Thar and Drago.
Topic: "glad to have this issue settled"
Posted: Friday, April 19, 2019 4:00:32 AM
Quote:
They're not 'usual constructions' but there are correct sentences like some of these (and you DO hear them occasionally).


The fact that they're not usual constructions but are still used occasionally adds to their being a murky area to me. However, it's becoming ever clearer thanks to good explanations provided by you and other native speakers. Most textbooks only cover simple cases.

Thank you very much, Drago!
Topic: "glad to have this issue settled"
Posted: Friday, April 19, 2019 2:44:53 AM
Hello!

Could you, please, tell me whether the sentences below sound natural?

Quote:
1)I'm glad to have this issue settled.
2)I'm glad to have it confirmed that they're coming next week.
3)I'm glad to have this conflict resolved


What I find curious is that slight modifications of those sentences do not accept the simple form "have" if we remove the "I'm glad" part and add a minor tweak to the first and third sentences. For example,

Quote:
4) We've had this issue settled by a third party
NOT "We have this issue settled by a third party". It would denote a habitual action, which does not make sense here.
5) We've had it confirmed that they're coming next week
NOT "We have it confirmed that they're coming next week". Same logic.
6)We've had this conflict resolved by a third party
NOT "We have this conflict resolved by a third party". Same logic


On the other hand, no perfect infinitive "to have had" seems to be needed in the first set of sentences assuming those sentences sound natural.

I look forward to your thoughts on that.
Topic: "if I plead guilty or no contest at my arraignment, I’ll be waiving my constitutional rights"
Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 10:47:24 AM
Thanks, Foundit!

Quote:
My opinion is that the future continuous conveys a sense of immediacy and ensuing consequences in this type of sentence



Quote:
The difference here is that if you plead guilty, then at that moment you will be entering into the condition of waiving your rights.


The underlined parts are important.
Topic: "if I plead guilty or no contest at my arraignment, I’ll be waiving my constitutional rights"
Posted: Sunday, April 14, 2019 8:58:53 AM
Hello!

Below is a sentence from The Criminal Law Handbook by Paul Bergman and Sara J. Berman.

1)
Quote:
A lawyer told me that if I plead guilty or no contest at my arraignment, I’ll be waiving my constitutional rights.


I'm interested in whether substituting the future continuous with the future simple in it would work without affecting how natural it sounds. Could you, please, share your thoughts on that? The second quote is the changed sentence.

2)
Quote:
A lawyer told me that if I plead guilty or no contest at my arraignment, I’ll waive my constitutional rights.


My opinion is that the future continuous conveys a sense of immediacy and ensuing consequences in this type of sentence as shown in the following quote. I'm not sure the same can be done with just the future simple.

3)
Quote:
if I plead guilty or no contest at my arraignment, I’ll be waiving my constitutional rights ~ pleading guilty or no contest at my arraignment involves waving my constitutional rights with immediate effect


Not so long ago I heard a similarly structured sentence with the future continuous. It's provided below.

4)
Quote:
If you enter this area, you'll be breaking the law.


Look forward to your comments.

Topic: (risk someone doing soething) vs (risk having someone do something)
Posted: Wednesday, April 3, 2019 4:38:03 PM
Thank you for your detailed response, Dragon!
Topic: (risk someone doing soething) vs (risk having someone do something)
Posted: Wednesday, April 3, 2019 3:21:10 PM
Thanks, FounDit!

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