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User Name: maltliquor87
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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Thursday, September 19, 2019 3:04:49 PM
Number of Posts: 229
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: "for something to do something" vs "to have something do something"
Posted: Monday, September 16, 2019 8:58:22 AM
Grand merci!
Topic: "for something to do something" vs "to have something do something"
Posted: Monday, September 16, 2019 8:29:09 AM
Thank you, Romany. I appreciate that.

What about my point that the patterns can be interchangeable in some contexts?
Topic: "for something to do something" vs "to have something do something"
Posted: Monday, September 16, 2019 7:53:10 AM
Hello everyone!

I'm wondering whether the patterns mentioned in the post's title can be interchangeable in certain contexts.

Below are a few examples I'd like a native speaker to take a look at. All the examples are mine.

Quote:
1 a) You need more than just some unsubstantiated claims for people to believe your story

1 b) You need more than just some unsubstantiated claims to have people believe your story

2 a) This politician just needs to say a few platitudes for his base to start praising his political savvy.

2 b) This politician just needs to say a few platitudes to have his base start praising his political savvy.

3 a) You'll need a team of competent employees for things to run smoothly in your firm.

3 b) You'll need a team of competent employees to have things run smoothly in your firm.


Could someone please point out which sentences sound ok?

Topic: Turning clauses with the future perfect into 'if' clauses
Posted: Saturday, September 14, 2019 12:33:42 AM
I'm a little bit surprised that the sentence marked as '6a' sounds ok. I've heard such phrases as 'have something done,finished,completed' in real conversations, but I've yet to come across 'have something mastered' even though it seems to follow the same pattern.

Thank you !
Topic: Turning clauses with the future perfect into 'if' clauses
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 5:00:26 PM
Hello everyone!

Here are a few sentences I'd like to expand to see what becomes of the future perfect.

Quote:
1) I will have finished this report by 4 o'clock.
2) I will have completed the task by 4 o'clock.
3) By the end of the course, you will have learned how to conduct new types of statistical analyses.


And below are the expanded sentences.

Quote:
4 a) If you don't have this report finished by 4 o'clock, the audit firm's work will be delayed as a result.
4 b) If you haven't finished this report by 4 o'clock, the audit firm's work will be delayed as a result.


Quote:
5 a) If you don't have the task completed by 4 o'clock, our team won't be able to proceed.
5 b) If you haven't completed the task by 4 o'clock, our team won't be able to proceed.


Quote:
6 a) If you don't have these new types of analyses mastered by the end of the course, you will have a hard time moving forward with your studies.
My guess is that this sentence sounds wrong.

Quote:
6 b) If you haven't mastered these new types of analyses by the end of the course, you will have a hard time moving forward with your studies.


Could someone please tell me whether the expanded sentences sound natural?
Topic: Skid in on the bubble
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 11:11:36 AM
Thanks Nancy, Thar and Wilmar for participating in this thread

This expression seems to be uncommon. One should not expect even Americans to know it as shown by Wilmar's reply.
Topic: Skid in on the bubble
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 11:03:30 AM
Thar, they were on the bubble in the process of getting in. That's the logic from what I can gather. Now that they've squeaked in, they are no longer. Just because an expression modifies a verb does not mean that the description behind this expression should also hold after the result has been accomplished.
Topic: Skid in on the bubble
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 4:42:45 AM
Thank you.

"On the bubble" seems to be an American expression. But I'm not sure the verb "skid" fits here.
While clicking around Twitter, I read the exact same sentence written by an American. It looked interesting, but I was not sure whether it would be universally understood among native speakers.
Topic: Skid in on the bubble
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:29:17 AM
Hello everyone!

Could someone please tell me whether the sentence "He skidded in on the bubble" sounds natural? It's supposed to mean "He barely made the cut" or "He was near the bottom of the list of people admitted".
Topic: 'without charges being filed'
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 1:07:37 PM
Thanks.

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