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Profile: Kirill Vorobyov
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User Name: Kirill Vorobyov
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Gender: Male
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Joined: Tuesday, October 04, 2016
Last Visit: Friday, April 21, 2017 7:36:01 AM
Number of Posts: 138
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 7:26:41 AM
DavidLearn wrote:

Yeah! He's awesome! But you have done that too, I believe!

David.


So is she he after all??
Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 7:17:15 AM
Romany wrote:

Umm...Tuna is a native English speaker and has taught the subject for many years.


Opps, sorry. Since her (hmm, Tuna is a female name, I guess?) location is Czech Republic, I thought she was Czech who just spoke English very well.
Do you guys know each other in the real life, by the way? I seem to be a blind stranger in a company of friends. Dancing
Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 6:51:22 AM
I am not a grammarian, so it's hard for me to speak in those terms, but I have made up two passages below to illustrate my point.

1. Tomorrow is Chris' first day in office. He wants to go to the city by train. If he misses the train, he will drive.

2. Usually Chris goes to the city by train, that's his preferred way, he doesn't like driving. But he hates beeing late, too. If he misses the train, he will drive.

The underlined sentences look similar, but convey diffirent meanings. From what I've learnt from your thread, I understand in passage (1) it is 1st Conditional, while in passage (2) it is Zero Conditional. The rule you are proposing would only hold for passage #1.

We have not heard from native speakers yet, though.Angel
Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 6:34:10 AM
I agree, but the reader has no way to know whether you mean a 1st Conditional, or a similarly looking Zero Conditional. So a rule like that would only hold within one particular chapter of the grammar book where they know they study 1st Conditionals.
Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 5:59:16 AM
I don't think we can safely make such a distinction.

The verb to create is obviously an action.

Say, a school's policy: If a pupil creates problems, he will be expelled.

Or a modernized gender-neutral version:
If a pupil creates problems, they will be expelled.


This is a general policy, it refers both to past and future. If they create problems, they are out.
Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 5:41:55 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Thanks for you reply and interest, but here I'm talking about the Open or Real Future Conditional (1st Conditional).

The dependent if-clasuse = Simple Present + The independent clause = will + simple form.

David.


Wow, sorry, I never realized it was so narrowly defined.Pray I wonder how many those types they have then.

Topic: In a performance
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 5:25:26 AM
Yeah, I guess it's a matter of introducing a new subject...

A boy of only 10, my brother looks an angel. But in fact the boy is a pretty spoiled one.

Topic: Are the following explanations true?
Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 5:20:02 AM
I am not a native speaker, so I strongly encourage you wait for a response from one before coming to the final conclusion, but I think whether the if-clause refers to future or not depends on the tense in the other clause.

If I miss the train, I drive to my workplace.

I think this is a legitimate sentence. It means whenever or every time I miss the train I drive. A general statement referring to both past and future.
Topic: What is "three dimes shy"?
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 9:57:12 AM
Thank you very much, Sarrriesfan!
Topic: What is "three dimes shy"?
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 7:21:06 AM
What does "I'll see the nickel" mean?

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