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Profile: Small Stan
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User Name: Small Stan
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Joined: Sunday, August 7, 2016
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:00:09 AM
Number of Posts: 25
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Thinkworthy, thoughtworthy or what?
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 9:50:16 AM
It helps a lot!
But!
The example with the sunset I gave just to show how I saw the word thought-provoking.
Exactly how I saw it: something happens and then appear some thoughts. They appear because something happened. No something, no thoughts. How or why they appeared - it's not important. The thing is that something happened and after that some thoughts appeared.
Like those thoughts need to have something to make them move. Some action took place here.

While, not-anymore-in-use "thoughtworthy" seemed to be just a passive thing.
Something happened. You just thought "it might be thoughtworthy". You found that something "thoughtworthy", but you still didn't think about it. "It's thoughtworthy, I'll think about it tomorrow, or when I have some free time".

Let's forget it. Don't know about you, but I lose too much energy thinking about this.







Topic: Thinkworthy, thoughtworthy or what?
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 9:04:30 AM
This is what I probably meant, just couldn't write it right.
His words were thought-provoking.
They just provoked some thoughts. I used my brain, stretched my mind. I heard the words, something turned in my head, and I started to think. Maybe about his words, maybe about something else.
But thoughtworthy seems to mean that I think about the words and nothing else.
His words were thoughtworthy.
Means that I should really think about what he said.

That's the way it looks to me.
Topic: Thinkworthy, thoughtworthy or what?
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 3:12:37 PM
But thought-provoking seems to be just provoking some thoughts. It doesn't mean that it worth thinking about it.
"I saw this red thought-provoking sunset." I used to look at sunsets like that with my girlfriend, then we broke up, time passed, now I see this sunset, and it just provokes thoughts.
Topic: Thinkworthy, thoughtworthy or what?
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 5:12:52 PM
Hello, english speakers!
Tell me, please, do you use those words in the topic's subject?
Like "in my journey I saw some thoughtworthy things" or "he said much thinkworthy stuff back there".
Thank you all big time!
Topic: I always vs. I've always
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 1:24:15 PM
Pretty clear. Thank you.
Topic: I always vs. I've always
Posted: Monday, September 18, 2017 2:10:01 PM
Hey, everybody!
"I've done my homework" means that I'm no longer doing it, right?
So, if I say "I've always wanted to come to Spain" does it mean that I wanted to come to Spain, but don't want it anymore?
What should I say: I've always wanted or I always wanted?
Thank you :)
Topic: Cleaning the yard.
Posted: Wednesday, September 6, 2017 11:50:32 AM
Thank you, guys, it is a helpful information.
Still, I used the word "yard" just for example. What if I say "I cleaned the riverbank" for another example? I came, I picked up some cups, spoons etc. left from somebody's picnic, I went away. I cleaned the riverbank from the trash? Or what?
Topic: Cleaning the yard.
Posted: Wednesday, September 6, 2017 10:29:29 AM
Hello, people!
Please, teach me.
I need to say that I cleaned my yard from/of/other word the trash. What is the proper word here?
Thanks to everyone :)
Topic: Interior doors question.
Posted: Sunday, August 27, 2017 12:33:48 PM
Wow! Thanks everyone, really!
Topic: Interior doors question.
Posted: Sunday, August 27, 2017 11:17:09 AM
Hi, people!

I used to work as an interior door(s) installer (is this job called so?) and I need to list that in my CV, so the question is simple: is it "doors installer" or "door installer"?
Thanks a lot! :)

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