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User Name: snafu22q
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Joined: Thursday, July 07, 2016
Last Visit: Monday, September 18, 2017 10:57:16 AM
Number of Posts: 134
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: is or are
Posted: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 4:36:16 PM
'Are' is correct, Elaine

While 'is' is used when speaking of singular objects, this sentence is speaking to the group - despite the term "each".

I'm sure Dragon can (and will) provide a clearer, grammatical description of the true reasons ...

We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: organic panel surfaces
Posted: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 4:23:11 PM
I took it to mean that the surfaces would be (probably) wood, and be of the type of wood indigenous to the area (note the comment about how the exterior and interior style complement each other).

fwiw

We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: Abeyance
Posted: Wednesday, March 08, 2017 10:56:22 AM
it means suspend ... delay ...

to "hold proceedings in abeyance for 60 days" means delaying court proceedings for 60 days


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: I would appreciate it if you could/would help me do my homework.
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 2:16:39 PM
Just a comment in addition to Drag0's response...

The peripheral phrases he mentions are *probably* of a polite nature, as he says. However, one should realize when you ask "would", you are asking if they are willing to help - but when you ask "could" ... while it could be in relation to time limitations they have ("do you have the time to help"), it could also be they are asking if you are capable to help.

If someone writing a thesis on fusion theory asks if I can help - it would depend on whether they wanted help in formatting, wordsmithing, typing (all of which I could help with), or if they needed help with the content of their paper. I could not help them in that respect.

It may be obvious to English speakers, but I thought it might be useful to point out another way it could be interpreted. :)

ciao

We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: I want to drink milk.
Posted: Thursday, February 09, 2017 5:16:46 PM
bihunsedap wrote:
He hasn't take solid food and drinks milk when he is hungry.

At nursery school. He told his teacher,
"I want to drink."
"I want to drink milk."


What is the natural way used in America if he is asking to drink milk? (in bottle.)


First, neither of your example sentences are grammatically incorrect.

1st sentence: A more natural way of saying this would be, "I want a drink." or "I would like a drink." (even more common would to replace "I would" with "I'd".)

2nd sentence: Others have given good alternative examples..."I'd like a glass of milk." or "I want a glass of milk." However, I must disagree with you know who i am - he writes, "I want to have some milk, since when asking for food or drinks, you usually use: have - What would you like to have? Will you have any drinks?". English speakers (at least those in the US) would say (for each of his 3 examples) ...

I want to have some milk. -> I'd like to have some milk. .... OR ... I want some milk.

What would you like to have? -> What would you like?
(His version is fine, really - I think it would depend on if the people conversing knew *what* they were talking about. If it was the first thing said by the waiter, it wouldn't be out of place at all. Hhowever, if the food orders have already been placed, and now the waiter is asking each person what they would like to drink ... I think my version would be used; 'drinks' would be understood.)

And finally, Will you have any drinks? -> Would you like something to drink? OR Would you like some drinks with your order?

And please don't take any offense, you know who i am - I can state with absolute assurance that your English is exponentially better than my Portuguese. Whistle

And as always with my suggestions - fwiw.


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: And Then the Breitbart Lynch Mob Came for Me - by Rosa Brooks
Posted: Wednesday, February 08, 2017 5:19:51 PM
progpen wrote:
The 'what ifs' are legitimate concerns. They don't have to use legal means to get any and all information they want from these forums. Forums are inherently not secure and gaining information from them would not be considered a high hurdle.


Indeed they are legitimate concerns.

I and my VOLVOs (thanks progpen) have moved to Whatsapp for texting of all comments, stories, and revelations regarding the current scurrilous fascists and dictators now in DC.

With a ball-less Congress now willing to ignore any Constitutional desecration by the cretin-in-charge in order to solidify the march back to the dark ages, an administration given direction by an alt-right racist tearing down everything that is good about this country, and a BOTUS with the attention span and maturity of a 5 year old that is more concerned about the ratings of a damn television show than he is about the intricacies of international diplomacy - I have no doubt the powers that be would trample any protection afforded by law to track down those not willing to drink the koolaid.


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: Tips and Links for English Learners
Posted: Wednesday, February 08, 2017 12:40:43 PM
mactoria wrote:
snafu22q wrote:
Hey Hope,

I'm wondering if we should include idioms that are a little more ... uh ... regional.

Having been raised in the South, one I've heard since I was a kid is "That dog don't hunt (no more)". Sometimes the 'no more' is used, sometimes not. Though when it is, it seems required that you insert the double negative. :D Crazy.

I'm not certain, but I would guess this is strictly Southern (and in all honesty, probably not nearly as common as it once was)- so there may be many younger Americans who've never heard this. :)


Snafu: According to the Stack Exchange idiom forum, "that dog don't hunt" or "that dog won't hunt" is from "the South" or the Ozarks, and supposedly modeled off the 17th-18th century saying about "that cock won't fight" regarding cockfighting....all supposed to mean something like 'that plan won't work." Hope mentions hearing it first from Dr Phil, but as a West Coaster I think my first exposure to it was Gov Ann Richards' keynote speech at the 1988 Dem Convention, a remark having to do with George H. W. Bush (who Richards didn't really consider a 'real' Texan because he'd moved there in his 20s and then left for politics in his late 30s). It's a great saying, but as you stated, not one that gets used much anymore.

Thanks mactoria - I had no idea where it originated. From what you quoted, it appears I grew up very close to the source - in Arkansas. And it does, indeed, mean that the plan to deal with a situation won't work. I think that it *usually* meant that what once worked, won't now - hence the 'no more' that was frequently added.

The turnip quote - I still hear it, though it's not quite the same as the quote on the image. It's "I didn't just fall off a turnip truck." Or my favorite variant (which I found necessary since I WAS raised in the South), "I may have fallen off a turnip truck, but it wasn't yesterday." And no difference in the meaning - it's still 'I'm not gullible'. Even if I am from the South.

FLASHBACK!!
I just had a memory slap me upside the head.
Thinking about the kind of person (that is, the stereotype) that would be considered to be the hick arriving in the big city from the country ... anybody besides me old enough to remember Klem Kadiddlehopper? Red Skelton. OMG that was funny - he'd dress up in a very loud, plaid or checkered suit that was way too small, a tiny hat that simply sat atop his head, and the stupid look he was known for...

Geez, I'm old. Sorry for digressing.


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: Tips and Links for English Learners
Posted: Tuesday, February 07, 2017 2:09:54 PM
Hey Hope,

I'm wondering if we should include idioms that are a little more ... uh ... regional.

Having been raised in the South, one I've heard since I was a kid is "That dog don't hunt (no more)". Sometimes the 'no more' is used, sometimes not. Though when it is, it seems required that you insert the double negative. :D Crazy.

I'm not certain, but I would guess this is strictly Southern (and in all honesty, probably not nearly as common as it once was)- so there may be many younger Americans who've never heard this. :)

We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: "Which variety of English should I learn?"
Posted: Tuesday, February 07, 2017 10:52:33 AM
Good morning all,

First, the typo - not important for the native English speakers, but since this thread is targeted toward non-English speakers ... #3 of Parser's list ... I'm sure he means "There is no reason, in my opinion, that there should be an "u" in that word." (colour)

As far as Brit vs American (or Aussie, Kiwi, ... etc) - it's all English. Maybe not to the purists out there, but in practical terms, it's all the same.

Are there differences? Of course - many. But I would argue that the differences are no more than the number of arcane, rarely used words that one learns while progressing through life. You pick them up and learn them as you need them. And while I may not receive exactly what I think I will if I order cookies or biscuits, I *will* learn from it.

I know very little about educational systems around the world, but I know that when a student begins English classes in Denmark (now starting in 3rd grade, I believe - bravo for getting your students started so early in learning another language, Denmark :) ), they are taught Oxford English - almost militantly, from what I understand. Using American English, especially that gleaned from American TV & movies, is the quickest way to doing poorly in class.

But Danes are excellent English speakers overall. It's all English - they'll adapt.

I have a question for those who have learned the Queen's English - specifically regarding the word "revert".

Many times I have been the recipient of an email that ends with, in essence, "...if you have any questions or if you are interested in this project, revert back to me."

Is it common for native (Oxford) English speakers to use 'revert' in this context? I have *never* seen it used in this way in AE.

The senders of these emails are obviously saying to get in touch with them, or reply to them. And in looking at the Collins dictionary, the 4th definition is indeed, "to reply to someone". And without exception, every one of of the senders that used 'revert' in this manner were not native English speakers (yes, I'm profiling - all had Indian or Pakistani sounding names; not that that matters, it's simply that I would have expected them to learn Oxford English due to the history between the Britain and this region).

So while this use is obviously grammatically correct, my question, again to native BE speakers - is this use of the word *common* in BE? Or would you have acted as I did..."Revert?? That means go back to a previous state."

Just curious - and when I get the answer, there will be one more AE/BE link I understand. :D


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson
Topic: I have eaten many foods here and they are not good.
Posted: Friday, February 03, 2017 12:49:53 PM
Ashwin Joshi wrote:
I am not arguing edy hmmm

Isn't food the uncountable noun, by itself, a plural?

I 've never come across any such word as 'foods'.

I am subject to correction.


Ashwin,
Indeed, 'food' is also a plural term. And if you were comparing all dishes within a restaurant, I don't believe you would say that you had tried all foods in the restaurant... much more common would be 'dish', 'dishes', or even 'menu items'.

While I think Hedy is correct in her discussion of the word "here", I don't care for her example, "I have eaten a variety of foods in LA, but did not like any (or some).". It does make sense, but is cumbersome. However, her use of 'foods' in this context *does* make sense - I would take it to mean a variety of TYPES of food ... Spanish, Oriental, Southern ... rather than a specific dish or specific item (apple, beef, crowder peas).

My suggestion for the resulting sentences would be something along the lines of, "I have eaten many entrees, appetizers, and desserts from the local eating establishments, and have determined that none are palatable".

Yeah - maybe a little excessive on my 'creative license'. :)

Oh, and Elaine - remember that 'many' refers to countable items (as Ashwin alluded to), but 'much' refers to an "amount*.


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. - Hunter S. Thompson

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