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Joined: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Last Visit: Thursday, April 18, 2019 8:52:07 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: infinitives/gerunds as subjects
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 6:25:47 PM
Hi all.

Very often it is ok to use either infinitive or gerund as a subject of a sentence. It seems to me that sometimes there is a difference which is hard to describe. However, in the sentence below, there may be a difference according to which one can prefer one version before another.

To push through turnstiles of a Taylor swift concert is to enter, as the saying goes, a women's space. Swift has the power to turn a hockey arena into a room of one's own.

Pushing through turnstiles of a Taylor swift concert is entering, as the saying goes, a women's space. Swift has the power to turn a hockey arena into a room of one's own.

What's the difference in my opinion? I would say that the infinitive as a subject in the first sentence suggests "one-time" action compared to the gerund.
From my point of view, the gerund in the latter sentence acts more like an action - therefore it is not possible to use it in this context, right? It just doesn't sound right to my ear. If it is so (and I believe so even though my phrasing is probably imperfect), it is a mystery for me as not every sentence has this difference. What do you think?


Thanks!
Topic: with...being
Posted: Tuesday, April 9, 2019 4:54:38 AM
Thank you very much!


I didn't ask this originally, but is it really true that in these two sentences it doesn't matter whether I use "being or not"? In my opinion, adding "being" wouldn't change anything, would it?

- Twenty different drugs including alcohol, were ranked, ending with alcohol being ranked as the worst overall - above heroin- meth, tobacco and more.

- Twenty different drugs including alcohol, were ranked, ending with alcohol ranked as the worst overall - above heroin- meth, tobacco and more.

- Drugs such as alcohol which have a major effect will rank more highly in the ISCD analysis, with tobacco being ranked lower because its harms are mainly personal.

- Drugs such as alcohol which have a major effect will rank more highly in the ISCD analysis, with tobacco ranked lower because its harms are mainly personal. -
Topic: with...being
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 5:11:13 PM
Hello all!

- With more people informed... = refers to people who were previously informed earlier (and still are).
- With more people being informed..... refers to people presently being informed.....which means "being" emphasizes something - the continuous aspect I guess!

However, in the two sentences below I was told the sentences would mean the same with or without being. Being doesn't emphasize anything extra and it would probably be a stylistic difference only.

- Twenty different drugs including alcohol, were ranked, ending with alcohol being ranked as the worst overall - above heroin- meth, tobacco and more.

-Drugs such as alcohol which have a major effect will rank more highly in the ISCD analysis, with tobacco being ranked lower because its harms are mainly personal. - Originally, this sentence didn't include "being".


How would it be in the following "sentence"?

....with socal media and access and people's opinion being heard. For the first time,... ( HERE- 4:10 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm-Dc9Vkv-s)

Here it seems to me that the sentence doesn't sound good without "being". However, I don't think "being" adds anything extra here - definitely not the same it does in the first two sentences "with people (being) informed".

So sometimes I have to use "being" in similar sentences with "with" to emphasize a continuous aspect and sometimes just for a stylistic purpose? + sometimes it will be pefectly fine not to use it at all - especially when I don't need/want to emphasize the continuous aspect?


Thank you :)













Topic: non-df part. rel. clause/ adverbial part. clause
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 5:51:36 PM
Thank you for your, as always, perfect help.

My teacher corrected herself that she meant non-defining reduced relative clauses (not just non-df rel. cluases), but according to your explanation.....it doesn't change anything anyway.

Thanks!
Topic: non-df part. rel. clause/ adverbial part. clause
Posted: Friday, March 29, 2019 7:14:30 AM
Ok, thank you. Well, my teacher thought they were.... :(

So, even the last three sentences are all adverbial I guess?
Topic: non-df part. rel. clause/ adverbial part. clause
Posted: Thursday, March 28, 2019 11:33:35 AM


Thank you. Well, what about these three below? These aren't non-defining rel. clauses either? I would say they are.



1) People, having invented cars, airplanes and nuclear bombs, are cute little animals.

2) The trees, having been blown down by the storm, ended up as musical instruments.

3) People, having cars, airplanes and mobiles, are really cute and smart animals.






If none of these is non-defining...may I ask you to provide me with at least one example of a non-defining sentence please? Thank you!
Topic: non-df part. rel. clause/ adverbial part. clause
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 5:21:07 PM
Hello all.

Are my asumptions correct here? Thank you!


1) The woman, having met an interesting lady, continued her journey. Is this Non-Defining participial relative clause?

2) The woman, having met an interesting lady, felt uplifted and continued her journey. Is this Adverbial participial clause?
Topic: "HAVING + -ed" in reduced relative clauses?
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 4:52:13 PM
Thanks, may I ask you about the following?

- Despite the fact that I tried to stay positive I remembered all the people having died (of cancer).....

This sentence is incorrect.

However, I've been told that a very similar sentence is correct:

- The apocalypse of 2054 was a consequence of people having had cars which needed fosile fuel.

So I guess if the sentence was as follows:

- My mind was troubled with people having died of cancer.

......it would be correct, wouldn't it? What's the difference?
Topic: Our audience could be provided with a presentation (being) given by one of our best historians
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2019 5:13:48 PM
Hello all.

I wonder why it isn't possible (at least that's what I was told) to use "being" in the following sentence. Why is it so? Could you, please, tell me? Thank you!



- Our audience could be provided with a presentation being given by one of our best historians.
Topic: "HAVING + -ed" in reduced relative clauses?
Posted: Monday, February 25, 2019 5:38:15 PM
Hello all!

Is it really like that, you don't use "HAVING + -ed" in reduced relative clauses? I mean these types of sentences:

- He squeezed through the crowd having just poured out of the railway station.

- Despite the fact that I tried to stay positive I remembered all the people having died (of cancer).....

Thanks a lot!

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