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Profile: EnglishFanatic92
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User Name: EnglishFanatic92
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Joined: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Last Visit: Saturday, February 9, 2019 12:54:11 PM
Number of Posts: 117
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: People already having a car won't be willing to travel by tram.
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 11:31:22 AM
What about this sentence?

- This isn't relevant for people without cars, it only concerns people having cars.

To me and my teacher, this one sounds fine.
Topic: People already having a car won't be willing to travel by tram.
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 3:17:19 AM
Hello all :)

I wrote an essay discussing how governments could protect environment. However, there is one sentence I am not sure about. My teacher told me that the it doesn't sound good to her and she would rewrite it as follows - People who have a car won't be willing to travel by tram. How does that sound to you?
I know, you don't use progressive tense with stative verbs. But, here it is a participle clause, not present continuous tense. With these clauses, it is possible to use "ing" form even with those stative verbs. So, what's wrong with this sentence? Is it just this sentence that accidentaly doesn't sound good? Looking forward to your answers. Thank you!


- People already having a car won't be willing to travel by tram.

Topic: I will do it while you are sleeping./...while you sleep.
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 4:12:47 PM
Hello :)


As far as I know these sentence are fine:




- Let's do it while I am working.

- I will do it while you are sleeping.


I think these may be too, but I would like you to check it for me, please:

- Let's do it while I work. ??

- I will do it while you sleep. ??

Would these be possible too? If so, what would be the difference compared to the first pair of sentences?

I think it is important to stress the fact that either the working or sleeping hasn't started yet. I am about to go to sleep or go to work.

I mention this (the fact that neither of the (future) events has started yet) since I know that if it was happening at the moment I'd have to use a progressive tense:

- You could cut the onions while the water is boiling. (right now- the water is already boiling - not in the future)while the water boils= incorrect.


Are my assumptions correct?


Thank you very much:)
Topic: as we speak/as you go along/as I say it
Posted: Monday, January 21, 2019 5:02:14 PM
I thank you so so much. Your feel for the language is amazing, Dragonspeaker. Thank you for all your help!

I know I've started an extra thread for this, but as this seems to be very similar to this topic too, I hope you don't my asking here again.


Isn't:

- In that video, he changes his facial expression while he says.....

the same "timeless fact" as the one here:

Quote:


"You can see how it changes as I dry it. It dries very...."

It is a fact - it is timeless. This is one of the uses of the simple form.
When she dried it in the past, it changed, became more opaque.
As you see her drying it in the video, it is changing, becoming more opaque.
In the future (if she does it again) when she dries it, it will change and become more opaque.
When she dries it, it changes and becomes more opaque.


?? In my opinion, it could be. It would be awesome :)

Whereas:

- In that video, he changes his facial expression while he is saying.....this is almost the same except the fact that this sentence
goes slightly more into detail and emphasizes the fact that he is in the process of saying something "when" (while he is saying that) he changes his facial expression (once).

Could be?
Topic: One day a furious storm blew up, but she refused to get out of the pool. Something made her carry on. Then she realized that, as
Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2019 5:30:24 PM
Hello!


1) One day a furious storm blew up, but she refused to get out of the pool. Something made her carry on. Then she realized that, as the water got colder and rougher, she actually got faster and warmer.

2) One day a furious storm blew up, but she refused to get out of the pool. Something made her carry on. Then she realized that, as the water got colder and rougher, she was actually getting faster and warmer.

This text (2)* comes from one Cambridge FCE preparatory book. So I expect the sentence to be correct. However, I don´t understand why the writer used past simple tenses (got colder and got faster). In my opinion there should be past continuous only. Why past simple is ok too?

As far as I know you use past simple+past continuous for situations like this:

- I was preparing dinner when my girlfriend came home.
- I was driving a car when she called me to tell me the news.
- I realized I wasn't doing the right homework.

In my original sentence, I perceive it as the same situation.

Something happened (she realized) while something else was happening (getting colder/getting faster). I was assured it was really something happening/going on when she realized that.




*(1) a native speaker who sometimes teaches me suggested this as an option too. Even more options would be possible, but he wasn't able to tell me why past simple is correct in these sentences.


Thank you!
Topic: as we speak/as you go along/as I say it
Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 3:23:15 PM

Hello :)

Once again, I need help from you, native speakers :-)

1)

Idioms like "as we speak" or "go along" are used in present simple tense:

A new building is being built as we speak. NOT: as we are speaking

The same would apply to a sentence with "go along" - this idiom is used in present simple even though it is happening right now (etc. at the moment we are now speaking to one another) O ne would guess present continuous would be the first choice. But no, you use present simple. I guess it is simply idiomatic to say it that way.

However, I once heard someone say "as we are going along" - present continuous tense! How come? Why is it so? Was it incorrect? Does it depend on the meaning of "go along" ?

2)

Also here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lte8CQrZllc TIME 2:02

- Here, I was surprised that the native speaker said "as I dry it". The whole sentence or two are in present simple and not continuous tense which I would prefer here as it is something that is happening at the moment! Why did she use present simple and not continuous?


Thank you for your help!
Topic: species of shark/species of sharks
Posted: Saturday, January 12, 2019 4:38:44 PM
Hello!



Which one is correct? Species of shark or species of sharks? Is there a difference in meaning? Maybe, one of them is slightly more idiomatic? Please, tell me :)
Thank you!


- And I've actually just finished filming various species of shark(s?).
Topic: tenses after AS - time conjunction
Posted: Thursday, December 20, 2018 5:27:23 PM
You were right to say as/while is quite confusing/complicated. There are easier things in English to master :(

However, I have just noticed I didn´t get one thing right - probably!


I thought that the present simple tense (in case the other part of the sentence is in the continuous tense) can be used after "while/as" only- not in the second part of the sentence. I thought it worked as in this example:


Quote:

I am working hard to make a comeback while he goes for his second title.



But, in one of your examples (see below) you did not use present simple after "while", but you did so in the other part of the sentence! It does not matter in which part of the sentence the present simple tense is?

Quote:
"While I'm working hard, he just fools around!" is shorter and sharper, more emotional, maybe angry.


If it didn´t matter I guess it would be ok to say:


Quote:

I work hard to make a comeback while he is going for his second title.






Topic: In that video, he changes his facial expression while he describes....
Posted: Monday, December 17, 2018 6:58:47 AM
Thank you RuthP and FounDit for your help. I am going to show this to me teacher and "discuss" it with her furthermore. I think it may surprise her. I am very grateful for all your advice provided here.

However, I have one more question before I do that.


FounDit wrote:
EnglishFanatic92 wrote:
Really? No difference? That surprised me quite a lot!
Well, yes, there could be a difference depending on what follows those words.

For example:
- In that video, he changes his facial expression while he is describing (this). In this case, his facial expression might change slowly.

- In that video, he changes his facial expression while he is saying (the word, grotesque). In this case, his facial expression might change very quickly.


Would there be a difference depending on what tense I choose after "while"? That´s what I was after. That´s why NKM surprised me when he said "I doubt that anyone hearing it would notice the difference."


- In that video, he changes his facial expression while he is describing/while he describes.... while he describes = present simple after "while" while he is describing = present continuous after "while"

The same applies for "says/is saying" after while:

- In that video, he changes his facial expression while he is saying/while he says....
So, even the change of the tense after "while" does not make any difference here at all?



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Topic: In that video, he changes his facial expression while he describes....
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 3:41:37 PM
Really? No difference? That surprised me quite a lot!

The difference wouldn´t be in these sentences below either?

1) Please, phone me when I do my homework.
2) Please, phone me when I am doing my homework.

In my opinion, (1) could mean two things:

I. I want the person to call me when I am done with my homework.
II. I want the person to call me when I am working on it.

Therefore, if I wanted to avoid any misunderstanding, it would be better to use (2) if my intention was to express (II.) ?! I guess this difference isn´t noticeable in my original sentences with "while he says/describes - while he is saying/is describing ?

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