The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: EnglishFanatic92
About
User Name: EnglishFanatic92
Forum Rank: Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Last Visit: Saturday, September 02, 2017 6:23:30 PM
Number of Posts: 64
[0.01% of all post / 0.14 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Consider ( to be) + words working the same way
Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 6:23:29 PM
Hello all.

Hello all:)

As far as I know it is possible to omit (to be) with words like: consider, seems, appears. However , I would like to know whether it is possible to do the same with another words? Also, would it be possible to omit "to be" here:

He is thought (to be) .... ?

Thanks a lot.
Topic: is/has been/are?
Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 6:21:12 AM
sureshot wrote:
EnglishFanatic92 wrote:
[quote=Drag0nspeaker]Hello.

Would it be possible to write it as follows? If so, in which meaning?

- Twenty-five years has been as long as it has taken me to discover what the meaning of life might be for me.

______________________________

"Twenty-five years" can be followed by a singular or plural verb. If you are considering twenty-five years as one period, the use of singular verb is justified. I would not use singular verb in your sentence. I would prefer to rewrite the sentence as:

- It has taken me as many as twenty-five years to discover what the meaning of life might be for me.

A better and short sentence is:

- It has taken me twenty-five years to discover the meaning of life.


Ok, thanks. Why don´t you like this structure? Just unidiomatic, too complicated or is it because present perfect doesn not suit there?

- Twenty-five years has been/have been as long as it has taken me to discover what the meaning of life might be for me.
Topic: is/has been/are?
Posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 4:15:35 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello.

It is an awkward sentence - neither 'is' nor 'are' sounds right.

Your teacher is right. Because you have the plural determiner "those", you cannot use the most common phrasing, "is".
Usually, one would consider "twenty-five years" to be one unit of time - a singular item - "one period". It would take no determiner or a singular "that". In this sentence 'that' does not work well - it's better to use a no-determiner.

Twenty-five years is as long as it has taken me to discover what the meaning of life might be for me.


Can I ask you one additional question?

Would it be possible to write it as follows? If so, in which meaning?

- Twenty-five years has been as long as it has taken me to discover what the meaning of life might be for me.
Topic: of/from
Posted: Saturday, August 19, 2017 4:26:43 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Not 'correct' or anything, but:

Both make total sense. They communicate exactly what you want to say.

This is a story originating in your childhood - a story of your childhood (not the story of your childhood, just one of the stories).

of prep.
1. Derived or coming from; originating at or from:

American Heritage

It's a story associated with childhood, and originating in childhood.

of - prep
used to indicate possession, origin, or association:

Collins
Like "A Tale of Two Cities".

It is the worst of those.

It is the worst story of your childhood.


I am sorry but could I ask you one more thing? Did you really mean that that it is possible to say - The worst story of my childhood. ?
What would you imagine if someone said that? In which context would you use it? Could you tell me please? After I let my teacher read your last post she wasn´t sure how you meant it - neither was I. Would help a lot. Thank you!
Topic: of/from
Posted: Friday, August 18, 2017 3:55:35 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Not 'correct' or anything, but:

Both make total sense. They communicate exactly what you want to say.

This is a story originating in your childhood - a story of your childhood (not the story of your childhood, just one of the stories).

of prep.
1. Derived or coming from; originating at or from:

American Heritage

It's a story associated with childhood, and originating in childhood.

of - prep
used to indicate possession, origin, or association:

Collins
Like "A Tale of Two Cities".

It is the worst of those.

It is the worst story of your childhood.



Thanks.

Happy to see that "of" can be correct in my original sentence.
Topic: of/from
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 6:36:27 AM
Hello all :)


If I wanted to write an essay about the worst health issue I experienced when I was a child, could the headline be as follows?

- The worst story of my childhood.

...meaning that there wasn´t any worse one during my childhood. Would "of" be ok? My teachers tells me all the time I should use "from" instead of "of" in this example. However, I don´t know why. She doesn´t know how to explain it to me. To me, both seem fine.

Thank you.
Topic: is/has been/are?
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 6:20:48 AM
Thank you very much. It helps a lot!
Topic: is/has been/are?
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 5:54:45 AM
Hi all.

From my essay:

Describing twenty-five years of life in ten to fifteen sentences is not easy. It doesn´t allow me to write many ideas. Those twenty-five years is (has been/are)as long as it has taken me to discover what the meaning of life might be for me.

My teacher told me "is" wasn´t correct here. Is she right? Would "are" be correct? Also, I would like to know if present perfect would be possible as well. If so, what would be the difference please? Which tense are you likely to use here ?

Thank you.
Topic: Use of HOWEVER in sentences
Posted: Thursday, August 10, 2017 8:55:24 AM


Hello all :)

As far as I know I could use the word "However" this way:

1) I liked the film. My mother, however, didn´t like it at all.

But I wonder if I could use it this way too:

2) We agreed, however, when we came back to our room, nothing had changed.

Thanks a lot.
Topic: those /these in this ontext
Posted: Monday, August 07, 2017 5:52:15 PM



Hi all.

I wrote an essay, trying to describe my life in ten to fifteen sentences.

From an enthusiastic player of computer games and a bored student I have become a “retired” player and an enthusiastic student. I stopped seeing priorities in material things and learned to see them in things no one can ever buy. A simple hello, helping mothers get onto the bus with their baby carriages, holding open doors, a little smile to a girl over there. (All) those are things which can make my or someone else´s day brighter.

My teacher suggests that I use "THESE" but she is not sure if "those" is possible as well. Could you, please, help me with this little issue? Thank you.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.