The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: EnglishFanatic92
About
User Name: EnglishFanatic92
Forum Rank: Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Last Visit: Monday, November 20, 2017 2:49:30 AM
Number of Posts: 75
[0.01% of all post / 0.14 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Look into papers./Look at papers.
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 4:57:25 PM
Dear native speakers of this beautiful language :)

Could you tell if it is possible to say both:

1) Look into papers.
2) Look at papers.

Is there a difference in the meaning?

Thank you very much.
Topic: Would "INCOMPREHENSIBLE" make sense too?
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 4:48:16 PM
Hello all :)


Could I use the word "incomprehensible" instead of "unreasonable" here? Of course, the meaning would slightly change but anyway....

Thank you!


- What you are asking me to do is totally unreasonable! It wouldn´t be fair to expect anyone to do something as difficult as this.
Topic: Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct (the) neighbour´s mistakes.
Posted: Monday, November 06, 2017 2:52:47 AM
palapaguy wrote:
Romany wrote:

It depends completely on what has come before. If "neighbours" have been mentioned before the reason for "the" is clear.


"Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct the neighbour´s mistakes."

Regardless of what went before, I can't imagine any grammatical justification for removing "the" from the sentence. Where am I going wrong?


I thought it would be possible to omit that as there is no need to use "the" before "notebooks" either
Topic: Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct (the) neighbour´s mistakes.
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 6:53:40 PM
Romany wrote:

It depends completely on what has come before. If "neighbours" have been mentioned before the reason for "the" is clear.


No, they weren´t.
Topic: Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct (the) neighbour´s mistakes.
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 6:52:42 PM
palapaguy wrote:
EnglishFanatic92 wrote:
Hello :)

Is it possible to omit "THE" in this sentence? I would leave it without an article. I would omit "the" as there is no "the" in between "exchange notebooks" either. Thank you very much!

- Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct the neighbour´s mistakes.


Responding to your specific grammar-related question:

You can't omit "the" if you leave "neighbor's" in singular possessive form.


Thanks. Could I omit "the" if the sentence went as follows:

- Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct (the) neighbour mistakes.

??

Topic: She insisted on me letting her drive. / She insisted on being allowed to drive.
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 3:40:03 PM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Unless there was a reason not to allow her to drive, such as being drunk or too tired.

I have sleep apnoea I am not allowed to drive as there is a danger that I could fall asleep at the wheel and veer off the road causing an accident, the government agency in the UK responsible for such things the DVLA has revoked my driving license.

Policeman at the scene of an accident " Why did you allow the victim to drive despite just arriving at the airport from a long flight".

Passenger in the car at the scene " She may have been jet jagged but she insisted on being allowed to drive".


This is exactly what I meant and I am very sorry I didn´t mention the whole context. Thank you! Could I use: She insisted on me letting her drive. (Even though she was too tired) ?
Topic: Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct (the) neighbour´s mistakes.
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 6:46:20 PM
Hello :)

Is it possible to omit "THE" in this sentence? I would leave it without an article. I would omit "the" as there is no "the" in between "exchange notebooks" either. Thank you very much!


- Later, we were to exchange notebooks and correct the neighbour´s mistakes.
Topic: She insisted on me letting her drive. / She insisted on being allowed to drive.
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 6:03:02 PM
Hello :)

Is one of these two sentences slightly better? Which one would you prefer to use in speech and which one in a formal writing? Thank you.

1) She insisted on me letting her drive.

2) She insisted on being allowed to drive.

Topic: way to appearing etc.
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 4:11:12 AM
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
First of all you need to use to and infinitive, not a gerund.

to appear
to be
to remain
to stay


Thank you!

BUT:

I thought "way" could work they same way as "steps" does:

- There are only three simple steps to making money online.

If I changed "steps" to "ways", couldn´t I really use "to making" ?
Topic: Bachelor studies or Bachelor´s studies?
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 3:21:44 PM
Hi there!

Which one is correct?

1) Bachelor studies

or

2) Bachelor´s studies

?

Thank you very much for your help.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.