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Profile: EnglishFanatic92
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User Name: EnglishFanatic92
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Joined: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Last Visit: Sunday, May 13, 2018 1:00:49 PM
Number of Posts: 96
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: use of a few words (out of our control/substitute)
Posted: Sunday, May 13, 2018 12:37:50 PM
FounDit wrote:
EnglishFanatic92 wrote:
Generally, something new replaces something old, and something new is a substitute for something old. In the case of a soldier, I think replacement fits better. You would be putting a new person in place of the original person. In the military, new soldiers sent to an area are referred to as "replacements".


Looking forward to your replies :-)

Thank you!



I can imagine "substitute" being used in football or even for a substituting teacher at school etc. So it is better use "replacement" only because it is the way they say it in the military?

Topic: use of a few words (out of our control/substitute)
Posted: Sunday, May 13, 2018 9:14:24 AM
Hello all!


- There may be situations that are out of our control, yet we can often influence the outcome. - Here a teacher (a native speaker- US) suggested that "BEYOND our countrol" is better. Is it really that? Is it possible to explain the difference, if there is any?

- The soldier´s injury is a trivial one. Yet, a short-term substitute will be necessary. Is it OK to use "substitute" in this context? I was told that "replacement" is way better.


Looking forward to your replies :-)

Thank you!
Topic: far from it/far away/far from home
Posted: Saturday, May 12, 2018 5:15:46 PM
Hello all!


"It was just about highlighting the pros and cons of staying and studying at home vs leaving home and studying far from it."


By "it" I meant "home" - is that ok to use it here? Or either "far away" or "far from home would be the only correct ways of expressing the idea? In my opinion "it" is ok!

Thanks a lot!
Topic: comparative as a synonym to corresponding?
Posted: Tuesday, March 6, 2018 5:01:57 PM
Thank you!

So comparable is an option too? That´s what I originally used.

Maybe it wouldn´t be so confusing if they used correspond instead of corresponding if they wanted me to "match it" with compare.
Topic: comparative as a synonym to corresponding?
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 5:12:27 PM
Hello all!


According to this exercise:


http://img24.cz/images/54506906670636590328.jpg

.....it says that the correct answer is (well, there is more but I am after this one) c1 = comparative


So, the key says that comparative is the synonym to corresponding. However, no dictionary shows that and even the meaning does not seem to be either "the same" or similar in any context. What do you think? Do you agree? I don´t think that the book is correct here.

Thank you very much!
Topic: back to back /in a row
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 5:06:12 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It is fairly common here (I'm in Scotland, so it may be a Scottish and American idiom, but not a common English one).

It means slightly different things, depending on context, but basically "back to back" means "without the opposite occurring in between".

For example Andy Murray was beaten twice by that one opponent - without his having beaten that opponent in between. Something happened in between (maybe a lot of other games), but he did not beat that opponent.
So it does mean the same as "in a row" in that case.

Another example I hear often is concerning holiday apartments. If there is a guest renting a room Monday to Friday (leaving about 11am Saturday) and another guest renting the room for the weekend (arriving noon Saturday) - with no day in between when no-one is renting it - it is called "back-to-back scheduling" or "back-to-back bookings".
The 'break' is so short that cleaning the room and changing the bed have to be done immediately.
If there is a guest Monday the first of February to Saturday the thirteenth, it is booked for two weeks in a row.
In this case, "back to back" and "in a row" are not the same.

What Romany calls a 'double period', I would take as being one class which goes on for two hours (a period was one hour, when I was at school).

1 - 2pm English
2 - 3pm Geography
3 - 4pm History.
These would be 'back to back lessons' - one teacher would leave and the next one would arrive with no break.

1 - 2pm Physics
2 - 3pm Physics
3 - 4pm History
These would be "a double period of Physics, back-to-back with a period of History". We usually had double periods for Physics, Chemistry, Sports and Art - lessons which needed equipment set up. It saved time (the equipment only had to be set up once for two lessons).

12:30 - 1:30pm English
1:45 - 2:45pm Geography
3 - 4pm History.
This would be three lessons in a row, they would not be 'back to back' as there is a break between them.


I understand the red text. However, it seems to me it contradicts what I highlighted in blue. The blue text says 2 weeks in a row - but there is no break! In your example (the first one in red) you say "These would be 'back to back lessons' - one teacher would leave and the next one would arrive with no break."

The same applies for the second text I highlighted in red - it contradicts what you said here " If there is a guest renting a room Monday to Friday (leaving about 11am Saturday) and another guest renting the room for the weekend (arriving noon Saturday) - with no day in between when no-one is renting it - it is called "back-to-back scheduling" or "back-to-back bookings. The 'break' is so short that cleaning the room and changing the bed have to be done immediately." Why? There is a break as well as it is in the second text I highlighted in red - however it is not possible to use back to back there!


I know this is how it works but would it be possible to make it more clear? I know it is hard and I may be looking for a rule which does not exist. Nevertheless, these examples you have provided me with are excellent if it wasn´t for those contradictions.
Topic: language existing/existing language
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 5:38:08 PM
I just would like to thank you for all your help here. It helped me a lot. I am really happy I now understand how it works. Great explanation. Thanks again :)
Topic: back to back /in a row
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 2:10:10 PM
Romany wrote:

Yes, that does sound confusing, I know.

The first time I ever heard it I simply couldn't work it out, because the concept of pairing 'classes' with 'back-to-back' simply escaped me.

But yes, it does mean one class following straight after the other, with no break period in between. The only people I've heard use it were North American. It's known as a "double period" elsewhere.



I don´t get the thing with the break either. I´ve seen "back to back" used in terms of the Olympics (2014-2018) Here it is obvious that something must have happened in between....


Also, I don´t understand the "scheduled thing" because of what I have heard. Andy Murray, a tennis player, used it when talking about being beaten by one opponent twice in a row - he said "back to back". In this case it was meant the way that the player had beaten him in their last two meetings (two different tournaments) . Between these two meetings there were some matches/torunaments but with different opponents. But most importantly, the tournaments were scheduled, not the two losses.....thit is what I don´t get :(
Topic: back to back /in a row
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 10:57:01 AM
Hi all :)



Are these two words (back to back and in a row) interchangeable?

I am not sure if I could use these two in the combinations below. If not, what makes them different?

My teacher told me that back to back is usually 2 things, schedule thing and the break is not possible to use for anything else :( However, the fact that it may be a "scheduled thing" makes it little confusing for me. What is your opinion? Please, tell me :) Thank you very much!


- 3 questions in a row/back to back.
- 2 lessons in a row/back to back.
Topic: language existing/existing language
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 12:46:19 PM
Thank you. I think I am starting to understand how it works.

However, there is one sentence I´ve found and it doesn´t seem to fit any of the "rules" mentioned.



Read this newspaper extract about a demonstration, then replace the words in brackets (this is what I have already done) with adjectives.


Yesterday´s mass demonstration was unforgettable for many reasons. The large turnout was not surprising and the atmosphere could be described as agreeable at the start of the day, with the level of policing acceptable. Unfortunately, for some....


Here "acceptable" is an adjective so I would expect it to go before the noun. Why is it ok to use it after the noun here even though it is an adjective?

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