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Profile: EnglishFanatic92
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User Name: EnglishFanatic92
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Joined: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Last Visit: Sunday, February 18, 2018 6:43:55 AM
Number of Posts: 86
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: language existing/existing language
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 6:11:41 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello English Fanatic.

Your "basic rule" is probably best stated by one of the people on StackExchange - where they have answered earlier.
I've highlighted one bit:
[quote=Sven Largs]
But otherwise (that is, if the modifier you're dealing with retains the same meaning regardless of whether it appears before or after the noun it modifies), though the "noun before modifier" form may sound less natural to some hearers than the "modifier before noun" form does, the two forms mean essentially the same thing.

Tiffany wrote:
Option 2 is the better sentence.

Option 1 sounds like a foreigner is speaking it.


The MEANING of the two sentences may be the same (the sentences are not 'incorrect' - they don't communicate different ideas - but one is 'natural' and the other 'sounds foreign' or 'doesn't sound natural'. - even "Completing the exercises suggested would take X." doesn´t sound as naturally as "Completing the suggested exercises would take X." to you?

In asking about sentences, it is best to specify what you want to know.

"Is this sentence correct?" to me (and to Tiffany on StackExchange) means "Does it make sense and is it the natural way for a British person to say it?"

Other people only look at grammar rules. There is a grammar rule which says that in some circumstances an adjective can come after the noun - so both sentences are "correct".

It is possible to use both structures. - Do I understand you correctly that even "The website focuses on all languages existing, including the most popular one, English. " is correct in the end? Or at least "correct"....


It is most common and sounds most natural to use the adjective first. Yes, but even in books for learners and articles written by native speakers I´ve met with the less common "version" where an adjective didn´t go first. So I felt like there must be a sort of rule which might be possible to apply for at least most examples. Here it seems to me it is really tough to find something a non-native speaker could rely on.
In some circumstances some unusual modifiers have a different meaning when placed after the noun.


Topic: language existing/existing language
Posted: Tuesday, February 06, 2018 6:22:40 AM
This is the source which says "All rivers navigable are being patrolled." is correct.


Click here

Thanks for your help but honestly, I am getting lost in that a bit. I thought I knew how this works and now......it has been "ruined" :(
Topic: language existing/existing language
Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 4:36:51 PM
Hi all.

Is it possible to use both structures? (see the 1,2 sentences below)

As far as I know I could say both:

- All rivers navigable are being patrolled.
- All navigable rivers are being patrolled.

- Completing the exercises suggested would take X.
- Completing the suggested exercises would take X.

All four examples are correct even according to native speakers. Therefore, I don´t understand why my teacher told me that the sentence number 1 (below) is INCORRECT! What´s your opinion?



1) The website focuses on all languages existing, including the most popular one, English.

2) The website focuses on all existing languages, including the most popular one, English.

Thank you!
Topic: rule to follow+ the same/which
Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 4:18:11 PM
Hello all :)

Here, I´d like to ask you two things:

1) Do you think that in the context of the sentence "rule to follow" is ok to use? My teacher suggests that I use "restriction".

2) My teacher thinks there is something wrong with using "which" following "the same" earlier in the sentence. So I´d like to ask you if the sentence is correct or not.

Here is the sentence: (talking about English forums similar to this one)

- The only rule to follow is to avoid asking the same or a very similar question which has already been answered on the forum.

Thank you!
Topic: can´t have been/couldn´t have been
Posted: Monday, February 05, 2018 2:08:32 PM
Thank you very much! I am sure this will help. I am going to discuss it with my teacher and I hope I will soon understand how it works properly.
Topic: can´t have been/couldn´t have been
Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 4:31:35 PM
Hello all :)

I was doing an exercise in my textbook but when I checked the results I was quite surprised at what the key showed.

I really thought that in these two contexts I could use “can’t have been”/“couldn’t have been” interchangeably. What do you think? Could I? The key has already been wrong a few times.


What I thought was correct:

Surely Sally couldn’t have been serious when she said she was going to sell all her possessions and go and live on a desert island?

The hotel couldn’t have received our booking as they had no reservation under the name “Wright”.

What the key says is correct:

Surely Sally can’t have been serious when she said she was going to sell all her possessions and go and live on a desert island?

The hotel can’t have received our booking as they had no reservation under the name “Wright”.  

P.S. I have already posted this on a different forum but have got just one reply. Therefore, I´d like to ask you too so that I can be 100% sure. Hope you don´t mind it, thank you very much!
Topic: happen to - are these sentences correct?
Posted: Saturday, December 16, 2017 4:18:46 PM

Hi all.

Are these sentences with "happen to" correct? Thank you.

- I happened to talk to Jane when her boyfriend showed up.

- I happened to work on something important when my girlfriend called me to pick her up at the airport.
Topic: Last but not least would be...
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 4:31:00 AM
palapaguy wrote:
IMHO "option" is the noun, not "last but not least."


Ok, is it possible to use both sentences?
Topic: Last but not least would be...
Posted: Monday, December 04, 2017 3:38:36 PM
Hello :)


1) Last but not least would be the option to prepay a membership for a much lower price.

2) Last but not least, there would be the option to prepay a membership for a much lower price.


I just wonder if "last but not least" can be used as a noun - see the first sentence. Or only the second one is correct?
Topic: With more people (being) informed......
Posted: Sunday, December 03, 2017 6:33:49 PM

Hello native speakers :)

Please tell me, which of these two versions is 100% grammatically correct? Thanks a lot!

1) With more people informed about the advantages of taking exercise, the information will be spread among other people faster.

2) With more people being informed about the advantages of taking exercise, the information will be spread among other people faster.

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