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Profile: Lasse Carlsson
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User Name: Lasse Carlsson
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Joined: Wednesday, August 31, 2016
Last Visit: Sunday, September 2, 2018 6:41:54 PM
Number of Posts: 13
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Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:13:18 PM
Orson Burleigh wrote:
Though this is not likely to usefully illuminate the subject, the old Norman sobriquet Curthose (meaning short breeches) might be considered.

As a nickname, Curthose is most associated with Robert Curthose, the oldest son of William I (William the Conqueror).
Think It seems unlikely that any particular preference for short breeches was responsible for Robert's being passed over for succession to the English crown (Robert Curthose's two younger brothers William II aka William Rufus, then Henry I aka Henry Beauclerc followed William I).


That's an interesting word. Never heard of that expression for knee-pants, neither did I hear about the man. So I looked him up in wikipedia only to lern that his German name is Robert Kurzhose. You figure out what that translates to, don't you?
Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Thursday, February 15, 2018 4:35:28 PM
mactoria wrote:
Knickers (or in this case, leather knickers) comes to mind. And though men may not wear knickers much if at all, knickers are an on again-off again style for women, at least in the US. Usually end at or just below the knee, worn with boots mostly, though they can be worn with bare legs or long stockings. I realize in some countries 'knickers' is the name used for underwear, but it's a pretty uncommon word for underwear in the US where it does refer usually to short knee pants.


It seems to me that the term leather knickers would be quite acceptable for an US audience, but not for the British speaking world.

To avoid that maybe leather knickerbockers would suite a worldwide audience. Or even knickerbocker lederhosen?

Or do knickerbockers mean underwear in BE as well?
Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 4:17:58 PM
I have to admit that maybe I want to be a little too meticulous.

Well, I heard that German translations of an English text often tend to be double in length. Some Germans tend to be very exact but lengthy ...

Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 4:04:11 PM
Romany wrote:

Hi Lasse -

I was just going to add that yes, lederhosen has embedded itself into the English language along with many other German words. But I think this is a bit of a trend:- kimono, kilt, pyjamas, etc. Though none of these are regarded as National dress, they are associated indelibly with their country of origin. (And, as Thar said, who else wears 'knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen' today?).

Hope - yep. That's where 'hose' came from: it was 'hosen' (plural) in English too, until around the 16th century. (We'd already pinched it way back when!)


THX, Romany.

So... what would leder hose for an Englishman mean?

A (garden-) hose made of leather instead of rubber?
Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 3:55:06 PM
thar wrote:
Breeches don't have to flair out (except in comedy sketches).

To me it implies a straight leg. How tight depends on the use it is intended for.



Thanks for that. My bad, you proved me wrong.
Topic: Is there a better word to replace "messy"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 3:07:06 PM
robjen wrote:
One of my best friends has told me something about his family. He says that he has a "messy" family. His father has a relationship with a few women outside. They all have children with him. Similarly, his mother has a few love relationships outside. His older brother is a gangster. There are a few more bad things about his family.

Is there a better word to replace "messy" for describing his family? Thanks a lot.



May I suggest broken family
Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 2:42:52 PM
thar wrote:
I would call them britches or knee britches.

The reason for the lack of a modern word is probably because they are not a standard item of modern clothing.

Knickerbockers are a bit more voluminous.


You might be just right, thar. These trousers are certainly not quite en vogue anymore.

As for the difference between kneebritches and knickerbockers let me show what I would say:

These are britches or breeches >>>



... made of leather >>>



Unfortunately they are too easily associated with these worn by SS soldiers




So I wouldn't want to call them that, especially as they don't resemble the lederhosen I meant.

>>>




... which are not as wide above midthigh, even though they as well are fastened at the knee by a leather buckle. They are much straighter and don't bulge as the riding breeches/britches.

>>>




Now for the term knickerbockers.

These trousers - in my humble opinion - are called knickerbockers. Here we have them worn by kids, which used to be quite commonly worn by younger boys in the US until they advanced to longs. That fashion was quite common until the 1930s I believe.





... or for grown-ups:




The knickerbocker trousers are as well gathered below the knee, but are much wider and fall over the knee-gathering.

Sooo ... both types of trousers don't quite resemble the type of lederhosen I meant. At most I would say:

Knickerbocker style lederhosen or breeches-style lederhosen, but I'm not content with that at all for the differences in type of trousers and for breeches for the above mentioned reason about the connection between lederhosen and WW II (SS-uniform).



I guess, I'm not quite sure yet which term could be appropriate.



Again thanks for all your contributions.







Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 2:00:56 PM
Thank you all and Danke schoen for your contributions.
Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 4:20:37 AM
Kiitos Jyrkää.

Problem is that probably no one in the US or UK would understand Bundhosen or Kniebundhosen while the word lederhosen may already have entered the English language like angst or hinterland.

Of course these terms are the correct German word for these kind. Every German speaking person understands Lederkniebundhosen or Kniebundlederhosen.

Yet I doubt any Englishman or American would.
Topic: A short English word for German "knee-length/knickerbocker-style lederhosen"?
Posted: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 4:00:46 AM
Does anyone know a short English word for these kind of lederhosen?




How would you call them? I guess you can't just say lederhosen.

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