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Profile: ashscot50
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User Name: ashscot50
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Joined: Wednesday, June 29, 2016
Last Visit: Tuesday, July 31, 2018 12:57:02 PM
Number of Posts: 66
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Topic: instal/install
Posted: Tuesday, July 31, 2018 11:32:20 AM
But strangely perhaps "instalment" is most definitely British English and "installment" is only used in the US, so far as I know.
Topic: Once the appeal was filed in the City Hall
Posted: Monday, July 30, 2018 10:14:22 AM
The question presupposes that a decision had been made to demolish the theatre, so I don't have an issue with "appeal".

Neither do I have an issue with "city hall" as shorthand for the name of the appellate body, if one such exists. I say that not knowing the actual procedure, because in my experience of American legislation, once a decision has been made it is often the case that the only route to challenge the authorities is through the court system.
Topic: Once the appeal was filed in the City Hall
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 10:44:58 AM
I would suggest dividing the one sentence into two:

Once the appeal had been filed in City Hall*, the controlling group of the old theater was informed that the demolition process would stop until the investigation time was finished (or perhaps better ".....was completed" rather than "time was finished").

"which would certainly affect the personal interests of the group leader and his right hand, since they knew that the faster this matter was carried out, the better it would be to avoid awakening the public interest in this dark matter."

I'm not sure that this makes complete sense, so I have drafted an alternative suggestion for your consideration:

This certainly would affect the personal interests of the group leader and his right hand man/woman/person, since they realise that the quicker the investigation is completed, the less likely it would be that public interest in this matter would be aroused.

*Note that "City Hall" is an American expression, the sentence works just as well without it: "Once the appeal had been filed, the controlling group....." OR "Once the appeal had been filed with the authorities, the controlling group......"

Also "theater" is an American spelling, which I have not corrected, in the Queen's English it would be spelled "theatre".

I omitted "dark" for the same reasons as others have mentioned, perhaps "difficult" would avoid a libel action.



Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:40:59 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Thank you all for your help and comments. Angel

David.


De nada.
Topic: On to
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:55:12 AM
In this case, "into" would be correct in my opinion. "Into" is a preposition, which applies to place, time, direction etc.

However, I can see that "on to" might work, if the sentence was "We are finally moving on to the last week of the league stage of the 11th season of IPL and it must be said that it has been one of the most open seasons ever in the short history of the tournament."

Curiously, however, "in to" doesn't seem to work because "to" in this context is not part of an infinitive verb.
Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:39:57 AM
Yes.

Edit

Apologies, agreed, "came" should be "come"; but otherwise I see nothing wrong with the sentence, albeit, it's perhaps "Spanish English".

Equally, "get back to" is "American English".
Topic: need your help to translate
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:38:32 AM
Submarine

The use of the term "submarine" or "sub" (after the resemblance of the roll to the shape of a submarine) is widespread.[1] While some accounts source the name as originating in New London, Connecticut (site of the United States Navy's primary submarine base) during World War II, written advertisements from 1940 in Wilmington, Delaware indicate the term originated prior to the United States' entry into World War II.[9]

One theory says the submarine was brought to the U.S. by Dominic Conti (1874–1954), an Italian immigrant who came to New York in the early 1900s.[5] He is said to have named it after seeing the recovered 1901 submarine called Fenian Ram in the Paterson Museum of New Jersey in 1928. His granddaughter has stated the following: "My grandfather came to this country circa 1895 from Montella, Italy. Around 1910, he started his grocery store, called Dominic Conti's Grocery Store, on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey where he was selling the traditional Italian sandwiches. His sandwiches were made from a recipe he brought with him from Italy, which consisted of a long crust roll, filled with cold cuts, topped with lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, oil, vinegar, Italian herbs and spices, salt, and pepper. The sandwich started with a layer of cheese and ended with a layer of cheese (this was so the bread wouldn't get soggy)."[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_sandwich
Topic: need your help to translate
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:33:32 AM
"to triple bag the catch" means to put the fish (in this case) inside three (probably plastic) bags, one inside the other, so as to try to reduce the smell from the fish.

"Subway" in this case is Subway an American privately held fast food restaurant franchise that primarily sells submarine sandwiches that are called subways or subs.

Hope this helps.
Topic: follow the team
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:40:53 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Helenej wrote:
As I can see from your replies, ashscot and thar, 'follow a team' can have both literal and figurative sense, but the word 'everywhere' is key here implying that someone travels after the team to watch its matches live.

If I got ashscot right, there are fans and 'real fans', who in fact are supporters.

Thank you very much.


I guess I should change my screen name to Sarriessupporter then.Drool
I hold a season ticket and often travel to away matches as well.


I would concur Applause though as I say in my book a supporter certainly is fan d'oh!
Topic: follow the team
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:28:33 AM
Helenej wrote:
As I can see from your replies, ashscot and thar, 'follow a team' can have both literal and figurative sense, but the word 'everywhere' is key here implying that someone travels after the team to watch its matches live.

If I got ashscot right, there are fans and 'real fans', who in fact are supporters.

Thank you very much.


Yes I agree with your analyses of the replies.

A "real fan" IMHO is one who pays money to watch their team, as you say a "supporter" in a financial sense as well as a football sense.

I do use the expression, "I follow my team everywhere" (I can get a ticket); and I would put a stress on the word everywhere, which most people here would take to mean into Europe as well as Scotland.

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