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Profile: ashscot50
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User Name: ashscot50
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Joined: Wednesday, June 29, 2016
Last Visit: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:41:14 AM
Number of Posts: 63
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Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:40:59 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Thank you all for your help and comments. Angel

David.


De nada.
Topic: On to
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:55:12 AM
In this case, "into" would be correct in my opinion. "Into" is a preposition, which applies to place, time, direction etc.

However, I can see that "on to" might work, if the sentence was "We are finally moving on to the last week of the league stage of the 11th season of IPL and it must be said that it has been one of the most open seasons ever in the short history of the tournament."

Curiously, however, "in to" doesn't seem to work because "to" in this context is not part of an infinitive verb.
Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:39:57 AM
Yes.

Edit

Apologies, agreed, "came" should be "come"; but otherwise I see nothing wrong with the sentence, albeit, it's perhaps "Spanish English".

Equally, "get back to" is "American English".
Topic: need your help to translate
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:38:32 AM
Submarine

The use of the term "submarine" or "sub" (after the resemblance of the roll to the shape of a submarine) is widespread.[1] While some accounts source the name as originating in New London, Connecticut (site of the United States Navy's primary submarine base) during World War II, written advertisements from 1940 in Wilmington, Delaware indicate the term originated prior to the United States' entry into World War II.[9]

One theory says the submarine was brought to the U.S. by Dominic Conti (1874–1954), an Italian immigrant who came to New York in the early 1900s.[5] He is said to have named it after seeing the recovered 1901 submarine called Fenian Ram in the Paterson Museum of New Jersey in 1928. His granddaughter has stated the following: "My grandfather came to this country circa 1895 from Montella, Italy. Around 1910, he started his grocery store, called Dominic Conti's Grocery Store, on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey where he was selling the traditional Italian sandwiches. His sandwiches were made from a recipe he brought with him from Italy, which consisted of a long crust roll, filled with cold cuts, topped with lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, oil, vinegar, Italian herbs and spices, salt, and pepper. The sandwich started with a layer of cheese and ended with a layer of cheese (this was so the bread wouldn't get soggy)."[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_sandwich
Topic: need your help to translate
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:33:32 AM
"to triple bag the catch" means to put the fish (in this case) inside three (probably plastic) bags, one inside the other, so as to try to reduce the smell from the fish.

"Subway" in this case is Subway an American privately held fast food restaurant franchise that primarily sells submarine sandwiches that are called subways or subs.

Hope this helps.
Topic: follow the team
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:40:53 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Helenej wrote:
As I can see from your replies, ashscot and thar, 'follow a team' can have both literal and figurative sense, but the word 'everywhere' is key here implying that someone travels after the team to watch its matches live.

If I got ashscot right, there are fans and 'real fans', who in fact are supporters.

Thank you very much.


I guess I should change my screen name to Sarriessupporter then.Drool
I hold a season ticket and often travel to away matches as well.


I would concur Applause though as I say in my book a supporter certainly is fan d'oh!
Topic: follow the team
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:28:33 AM
Helenej wrote:
As I can see from your replies, ashscot and thar, 'follow a team' can have both literal and figurative sense, but the word 'everywhere' is key here implying that someone travels after the team to watch its matches live.

If I got ashscot right, there are fans and 'real fans', who in fact are supporters.

Thank you very much.


Yes I agree with your analyses of the replies.

A "real fan" IMHO is one who pays money to watch their team, as you say a "supporter" in a financial sense as well as a football sense.

I do use the expression, "I follow my team everywhere" (I can get a ticket); and I would put a stress on the word everywhere, which most people here would take to mean into Europe as well as Scotland.
Topic: follow the team
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 6:39:34 AM
Helenej wrote:
This is kind of a riddle in a texbook.

"I follow my team everywhere. They are the best. Who am I?" The answer is: a fan.

I wonder what "I follow my team everywhere" mean? Does it literally mean to move after the team wherever it goes or it can also mean to watch the team's matches on television and read about it in newspapers and the internet?


No it doesn't (mean to watch the team's matches on television and read about it in newspapers and the internet).

I am a (Glasgow) Rangers supporter; I follow my team all over Scotland and have followed them to 21 countries in Europe. "Following" your team means just that, going to see them play somewhere other than at their home ground, which in the case of Rangers, is Ibrox Stadium, Glasgow. I have a season ticket for home matches.

It does not include watching the team on the internet or television, though I may have to do that if I can't get a ticket for an away match.

I define "supporter" as someone who pays money to watch their team live or perhaps by subscription TV if living outside Scotland. I define "fan" as someone who "follows" a team in the sense that they have an allegiance to a certain team and "follow" in the sense that they look for their results, but may not go to see matches at least not on a regular basis; not in the sense of physically following i.e. travelling to watch them play. So in my book a fan is not necessarily a supporter but a supporter certainly is a fan.

I think this is where your confusion may have arisen.

I hope this helps you understand the distinction; but the fact that I've edited this answer about 6 times shows that it is quite difficult concept and subjective opinions will differ.

Incidentally your citizen, Oleksiy Oleksandrovych Mykhaylychenko more commonly known as Alexei Mikhailichenko played for Rangers from 1991 to 1996.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYlcxTlR_Z0
Topic: Bill / Note
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 6:23:46 AM
Priscilla86 wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I just thought, also.

I have never had a pizza delivered, but just checked the prices. I would often pay in coins, not notes.

On tipping, I tend to do what thar says (when I pay a taxi, for example) - If it's 6.20 or 6.40, I just give 7.00 in coins, if it's 6.60 to 7.00 or so, I give 7.50 or 8.00 (somewhere near 10%). Usually I just give them the money and don't wait for the change.


But wouldn't that be a lot of coins? Thought notes would be more practical. What's the biggest denomination that you have? Over here we only go up to $1 so that would mean I'd have to have 8 $1 coins with me.

ashcot50 wrote:
Personally I find it extremely odd not to say quite contemptuous, that a tourist in any country would attempt to pay with their own currency rather than the currency of the country they are visiting. I have seen this often in Mexico with American tourists offering $20/50 bills for ice cream and EXPECTING the shop owners to accept that without hesitation, which regrettably most will do.


Do Mexicans value USD more or they just acquiesce to this request out of fear of confrontation? I understand in Cambodia it's the former. Cambodians actually prefer USD from tourists due to their poor economy. And then there's also the matter of convenience. There's this Indonesian island called Bintan about 55mins south of Singapore. It's a resort island with no airport which is quite popular with Singaporeans and international tourists. Most tourists will come from Singapore (Indonesians seldom go there as it's too expensive) so they price and charge everything in SGD out of convenience (though rupiah is accepted).


The highest value UK coins are now £2 but are not all that common compared with £1 coins. The UK had £1 bank NOTES until 1988.

http://home.bt.com/news/world-news/november-12-1984-end-of-the-road-for-the-pound-note-11363943332232

Scottish banknotes

These are the recognised currency in Scotland, although they are not legal tender. They are always accepted by traders in Scotland, and are usually accepted in other parts of the United Kingdom. However, some outside Scotland are unfamiliar with the notes and they are sometimes refused. Institutions such as clearing banks, building societies and the Post Office will readily accept Scottish bank notes. Branches of the Scottish note-issuing banks situated in England dispense Bank of England notes and are not permitted to dispense their own notes from those branches. Modern Scottish banknotes are denominated in pounds sterling, and have exactly the same value as Bank of England notes; they should not be confused with the former Pound Scots, a separate currency which was abolished in 1707.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknotes_of_the_pound_sterling

The Scottish banks issue notes in denominations of £5, £10, £20, £50 and £100. The Scottish £1 note continued in use for some years after the English note was withdrawn but currently only the Royal Bank of Scotland continues to issue a small volume of £1 notes. (These are generally to celebrate an important anniversary such as centenary of the death of the famous Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson)

http://heritagearchives.rbs.com/our-banknotes/commemorative-notes.html.

I haven't tried to use one for years, I'm not sure it it would be accepted even in Scotland.

http://www.scotbanks.org.uk/banknote_denominations.php
http://www.scotbanks.org.uk/banknote_history.php

On the latter point I think it's because they want the business and value that above their own self esteem and that of their country. I doubt a Mexican or a Brit for that matter would get much joy offering pesos or pounds for ice cream most any place in the US.
Topic: Bill / Note
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 5:33:21 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi Priscilla!

I don't know what you usually say in your area.
As thar says, Americans use 'bills', so usually you hear of 'dollar bills' and 'pound notes' - never 'dollar notes' or 'pound bills'.

So - "With what note will you be paying?" is great for Britain (and would mean "which denomination?"), but wouldn't work well in the USA.

I have never lived anywhere where you could pay for a pizza with different currencies.
In Britain you pay with pounds or pounds! - though a few 'tourist' shops and hotels in the south and some big cities will take Euros.
In the USA when I was there, even some banks wouldn't take a deposit in pounds.

The questions I would ask are:
"Can you tell me what notes you'll be using, so I can have the change ready?" (meaning 'Which denomination?')

"Which currency will you be using?" or more likely "Are you paying in pounds or euros?"


Unlike the UK, the US banking system is parochial and non-integrated. Therefore you will have difficulty cashing a cheque from one bank in another institution as I found out many years ago when receiving money at Western Union and opting for payment by cheque (check, in US English), found it drawn on a Californian Bank which was completely unacceptable in North Carolina! Most regular US bank branches have no experience of dealing with foreign currency, let alone have the facility to accept or exchange it.

The main exception to this is in Hawai'i where I found that a Chinese tourist was able to pay for a polo shirt in Crazy Shirts with Chinese bank notes and get change in USD. The till has an auto conversion (no doubt at a poor exchange rate). This is because Hawai'i is geared up for Japanese and increasing numbers of Chinese tourists. I didn't need try it but I doubt they would have had the same facility for GBP or Euros but I may be wrong.

Personally I find it extremely odd not to say quite contemptuous, that a tourist in any country would attempt to pay with their own currency rather than the currency of the country they are visiting. I have seen this often in Mexico with American tourists offering $20/50 bills for ice cream and EXPECTING the shop owners to accept that without hesitation, which regrettably most will do.

On the other hand, tourist shops in Russia routinely accept and display prices in Rubles, USD, Euro and GBP. Equally in some Latin American countries e.g. Peru, high end tourist shops, such as those selling Alpaca scarves etc tend to display prices in USD rather than local currency for the simple reason that most Peruvians could not afford to buy these items. However, if you need to change some money, in cities such as Cusco you will find an abundance of money changers in high viz jackets on every street corner with wads of Nuevo Soles in one hand and a calculator in the other!

Of course credit and debit cards generally allow the choice of local or billing currency and perhaps that is a source of confusion for tourists but it does remind me of my first visit to the US 30 years ago when I was asked for sight of one of our DOLLAR BILLS. These days I think most if not all Americans would be aware that other countries have different names for their currency but since only 35% of Americans own a passport those outside the hospitality and retail industries in tourist areas may not have that experience.

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