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Profile: Paulo Rogério 7
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User Name: Paulo Rogério 7
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Tuesday, May 31, 2016
Last Visit: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 8:47:37 AM
Number of Posts: 31
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Why do people use profanity?
Posted: Monday, January 14, 2019 7:19:34 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
My mother had a stroke (many years ago) and lost the power of speech.

She kept trying and trying (even from the first moments of coming around after the stroke itself).
A few weeks later, she was given an injection, and said her first word - "Bugger!"

Indeed, the very first shocking words from childhood are the first to come back after an extense brain injury. Even though inappropriate sometimes, or used in a wrong context. I went through the suggested article and was impressed with this quote:
"The traits of narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism are collectively known as the “dark triad” of personality, and are associated with greater dishonesty" (and cursing as a whole, I learnt).
Topic: kowtow
Posted: Monday, January 14, 2019 6:42:19 PM
Do chinês ketou, ao pé da letra “bater a cabeça”, faz referência ao antigo costume chinês de ajoelhar-se diante de alguém e tocar o chão com a testa para mostrar respeito, reverência e submissão.

From Chinese ketou, literally "hit the head", it refers to the ancient Chinese tradition of kneeling before someone and touch the ground with the forehead as a sign of respect. And I was thinking about cows!
Topic: tongue-in-cheek
Posted: Friday, January 11, 2019 7:45:44 AM
That calls for a meme, but I was unable to insert images. Can someone please teach me how to do it?
Topic: Mogul in India
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 3:08:51 PM
I was doing a research about mogul, mughal, initially as a ski fan, and I ended up in ancient India and mongolian governors. Then I learnt that nabob or nawab has the same origin, so I wondered if calling someone a "mogul" in India is pejorative or a compliment? I wish somebody could "complement" it, always stuck with these pronunciations!
Topic: Interesting (and dangerous) idioms
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 2:47:40 PM
As I said, quite a good way to start a new year! Very enlightening comments and I was particularly comforted to see native people also struggling with some words. Thank you all you guys that take some time to share your expertise in here. In fact, English words are so slippery that I'm always afraid making shit.
Topic: are to support
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 12:58:14 PM
"These guidelines are for", it is implicit here "the destination, the utility, the reason" . It makes perfect sense in Latin languages.
Topic: Interesting (and dangerous) idioms
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 6:19:07 PM
Two interesting idioms to discuss:
"call in a chit", as in "Are you asking me as a friend, or are you calling in a chit?" Are you asking me a favour or collecting a debt? I was wondering if someone wouldn't call in a shit by mistake.
"call in the chips", as when you sell something you own in order to get money from that. As an analogy to poker, I suppose.
Think what a way to start a new year!
Topic: Interesting (and dangerous) idioms
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 6:17:45 PM
Two interesting idioms to discuss:
"call in a chit", as in "Are you asking me as a friend, or are you calling in a chit?" Are you asking me a favour or collecting a debt? I was wondering if someone wouldn't call in a shit by mistake.
"call in the chips", as when you sell something you own in order to get money from that. As an analogy to poker, I suppose.
Think what a way to start a new year!
Topic: Let alone
Posted: Thursday, December 27, 2018 2:55:09 PM
I'll quote Owlman 5 for a similar question at Harry Potter:
"Hi. "Being" sounds really strange after "to" in that sentence. I definitely expect the infinitive: Get ready to not be able to smell at all. If the sentence used "for" instead of "to", I'd have no problem with "being": Get ready for not being able to smell at all. With this small correction, both sentences mean the same thing to me."

I would be good with the same here.
Topic: Academy: A modern school where football is taught.
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 7:11:27 PM
Most famous here is GFPA Academy. World Champion, twice vice-champion

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