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Profile: ibj_ldn
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User Name: ibj_ldn
Forum Rank: Member
Occupation: teacher
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Joined: Friday, January 29, 2016
Last Visit: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:02:20 AM
Number of Posts: 78
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Strength is just an accident arising from the weakness of others.
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:02:20 AM
Strength is just an accident arising from the weakness of others [Joseph Conrad (1857-1924)].

Meaning we don't have strength of our own...
Topic: It does make a difference what you call things.
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 8:27:14 AM
Maybe it should (also) be "It does make a difference HOW you call AND TELL things." but I'm not a native speaker, so...
Topic: But what we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.
Posted: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 12:28:29 PM
Five Fascinating Facts about George Eliot

Fun facts from the life of Victorian novelist George Eliot, author of Middlemarch

1. She received £20 for her first book – which was a translation of a work of biblical scholarship. Before she reinvented herself as ‘George Eliot’, Mary Anne Evans (it’s also been spelled Mary Ann and Marian) was a translator of German works of ‘Higher Criticism’. Although of course she never attended university – no woman could until later in the century – Evans was exceedingly well-educated and undertook the translation of David Strauss’ Das Leben Jesu, or ‘Life of Jesus’, when she was in her mid-twenties. The book was controversial because it claimed that although a historical Jesus had probably existed, he was not the son of God.

2. She is the first person to refer to modern tennis and to ‘pop’ music. The Oxford English Dictionary George Eliotcredits Eliot with the earliest known references to both lawn tennis (in 1878) and ‘pop’ in relation to music (in 1862).

3. At one time George Eliot was close to celebrated evolutionary biologist Herbert Spencer. But Spencer was supposedly put off by Eliot’s unconventional looks, which were often remarked upon. Henry James said she was ‘magnificently ugly, deliciously hideous’, a ‘great horse-faced bluestocking’, while William Michael Rossetti, brother of his two more famous siblings, Dante Gabriel and Christina, remarked that Eliot was ‘a woman with next to no feminine beauty or charm or of countenance or person’. Ouch. Female commentators often agreed with these descriptions, but none could deny Eliot’s prodigious intellect.

4. For her novel Romola she received the then-record payment for a novel of £10,000. By 1862, Eliot was the leading female novelist in Britain and the success of works such as Adam Bede and The Mill on the Floss had made her hot property. For her ambitious 1862-3 novel Romola – set in fifteenth-century Florence around the time of the infamous ‘Bonfire of the Vanities’ – she earned the biggest publisher’s advance that had yet been bestowed upon a novelist. Romola is, however, now among Eliot’s least-known works, along with Felix Holt, the Radical, about the First Reform Act of 1832 and the political upheaval attending it. Eliot was by this stage a literary superstar: when Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd was published anonymously in 1874, some people thought Eliot was the author. Eliot is now best-remembered for Middlemarch, her masterpiece (which we include in our pick of the best Victorian novels), though her novels Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner, and Daniel Deronda continue to find admiring readers.

5. On her gravestone in Highgate Cemetery, the name ‘George Eliot’ appears in quotation marks; her real name is given, but it isn’t Evans. Marian Evans/George Eliot lived for over twenty years as the common-law wife of Victorian critic and man of letters, G. H. Lewes. Between them, they helped to define the literary tastes of the era. However, Lewes was already in an open marriage and could not obtain a divorce from his wife, so he and Evans could never marry in the eyes of the law. They lived together, however, until Lewes’s death in 1878. A couple of years later, ‘George Eliot’ married a man named John Walter Cross. It’s one of the more curious facts about her life that, when she died a few months after the wedding, in 1880, she died as ‘Mary Ann Cross’, so that is the (official) name on her gravestone in Highgate Cemetery – the illustrious final resting place of many other noted figures, including Karl Marx and Douglas Adams.


https://interestingliterature.com/2015/09/24/five-fascinating-facts-about-george-eliot/
Topic: If you don't get what you want, it's a sign either that you did not seriously want it, or that you tried to bargain over the...
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 1:27:51 PM
RUDYARD KIPLING | 10 FACTS ON THE FAMOUS ENGLISH AUTHOR

#1 He was named after the Rudyard Lake in England;

#2 He described dreadful years of his childhood in his short story Baa Baa, Black Sheep;

#3 He captured his adolescent years in his novel Stalky & Co.;

#4 His first published collection of verse was Departmental Ditties;

#5 Kipling married Caroline Starr Balestier and had three children with her;

#6 Rudyard Kipling was the highest paid writer in the world;

#7 Two of his three children died at an early age due to sickness and war;

#8 Rudyard Kipling remains the youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature;

#9 Rudyard Kipling is considered a major innovator in short story writing;

#10 George Orwell called Kipling a prophet of British imperialism;



https://learnodo-newtonic.com/rudyard-kipling-facts
Topic: The July 20 Plot
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 1:17:45 PM
2008: Valkyrie, with Tom Cruise as Stauffenberg.

What a fine movie that is.
Topic: live and kicking
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 12:46:36 PM
"Alive and Kicking" is a song by the Scottish rock band Simple Minds, released in 1985, which reached the Top three on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and served as first single from the band's most successful album, Once Upon a Time.

Lyrics

You turn me on, you lift me up
And like the sweetest cup I'd share with you
You lift me up, don't you ever stop, I'm here with you

Now it's all or nothing
'Cause you say you'll follow through
You follow me, and I, I, I follow you

What you gonna do when things go wrong?
What you gonna do when it all cracks up?
What you gonna do when the Love burns down?
What you gonna do when the flames go up?
Who is gonna come and turn the tide?
What's it gonna take to make a dream survive?
Who's got the touch to calm the storm inside?
Who's gonna save you?
Alive and Kicking
Stay until your love is, Alive and Kicking
Stay until your love is, until your love is, Alive

Oh you lift me up to the crucial top, so I can see
Oh you lead me on, till the feelings come
And the lights that shine on
But if that don't mean nothing
Like if someday it should fall through
You'll take me home where the magic's from
And I'll be with you

What you gonna do when things go wrong?
What you gonna do when it all cracks up?
What you gonna do when the Love burns down?
What you gonna do when the flames go up?
Who is gonna come and turn the tide?
What's it gonna take to make a dream survive?
Who's got the touch to calm the storm inside?
Don't say goodbye
Don't say goodbye
In the final seconds who's gonna save you?

Oh, Alive and Kicking
Stay until your love is, love is, Alive and Kicking
Oh, Alive and Kicking
Stay until your love is, love is, Alive and Kicking

Written by Charles Burchill, James Kerr, Michael Joseph Macneil • Copyright © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management US, LLC
Topic: If you don't get what you want, it's a sign either that you did not seriously want it, or that you tried to bargain over the...
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 12:39:59 PM
If you can meet success and failure and treat them both as impostors, then you are a balanced man, my son.
- Rudyard Kipling
Topic: Zambia Gains Independence (1964)
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 12:29:48 PM
Zambia Gains Independence (1964)

The flag of Zambia is the national flag of Zambia. It was adopted upon independence on October 24, 1964. Before that, Zambia was the British protectorate of Northern Rhodesia and used a defaced Blue Ensign as its flag.

The current flag is used as both national flag and ensign. It is green with an orange-coloured African fish eagle in flight over a rectangular block of three vertical stripes, coloured, from left to right: red, black and orange. The placement of the eagle and block of stripes at the flag's fly is notable as most emblems and devices on flags are placed at centre or at the hoist. The colours used in the flag of Zambia are rich in symbolism. Green stands for the nation's lush flora, red for the nation's struggle for freedom, black for the Zambian people, and orange for the land's natural resources and mineral wealth. Additionally, the eagle flying above the coloured stripes is intended to represent the people's ability to rise above the nation's problems.

The Zambian flag was slightly modified in 1996. The shade of green used in the 1964 flag was replaced with a brighter and lighter green and the eagle was slightly altered so as to be more like the one used in the Zambian coat of arms.

(...)

The flag's colours and emblems are rich in symbolism. Each of the four colours represents an aspect of Zambia: green for the country's natural resources and vegetation; red for its struggle for freedom; black for its people and orange for its mineral wealth (primarily copper). The eagle is an African fish eagle, which also appears in the national coat of arms and represents the people's ability to rise above the nation's problems.

(...)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Zambia

Topic: Annie Edson Taylor (1838)
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 12:26:54 PM
Now I know where they get the ideia from to make that famous Woody Woodpecker cartoon episode...
Topic: Guilt has very quick ears to an accusation.
Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 1:49:13 PM
Guilt: the gift that keeps on giving.
- Erma Bombeck, American humorist (1927-1996)

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