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Profile: luckyguy
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User Name: luckyguy
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Joined: Friday, December 25, 2015
Last Visit: Saturday, March 25, 2017 11:19:02 AM
Number of Posts: 194
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: next month vs in the next month vs over the next month
Posted: Saturday, March 25, 2017 11:19:02 AM
I am going to make up three sentences with additional words in each one.

(1) Next month, we will gather people's opinions about how to improve the current social services in the local community.

(2) In the next month, we will gather people's opinions about how to improve the current social services in the local community.

(3) Over the next month, we will gather people's opinions about how to improve the current social services in the local community.


Could someone please explain how "in the" and "over the" change the meaning of the sentences? Thank you for your help.

Topic: Which preposition fits best in my example?
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 10:58:01 AM
I am going to make up an example below.

(ex) I am very sleepy today because I did not have enough sleep "for" or "during" or "over" the last four nights.

Which preposition fits best in my example? Thanks.
Topic: Do you have to repeat "will go to"?
Posted: Friday, February 24, 2017 3:48:57 AM
I am not sure if I have to repeat "will go to" in my first sentence.

(1) Next year, Mary will go to grade 1, Jill will go to grade 2, John will go to grade 3, Jack will go to grade 4 and Doug will go to grade 5.

Can I drop most of the "will go to's" in the sentence as written below?

(2) Next year, Mary will go to grade 1, Jill grade 2, John grade 3, Jack grade 4 and Doug grade 5.

Thanks a lot.
Topic: Which one sounds more natural?
Posted: Friday, February 24, 2017 3:42:48 AM
Suppose that you are looking at two specific cars in a car show. Car A is made in the UK and Car B is made in France.

(1) The UK-made and the French-made cars both cost under $5000.

(2) The UK-made and French-made cars both cost under $5000.

Which sentence sounds more natural? Thanks.



Topic: experience arises from teaching ....
Posted: Friday, February 24, 2017 3:28:48 AM
I am not sure if I can use the word "arise".

my original word choice: comes

(1) Most of John's work experience comes from teaching young children.

my new word choice: arises

(2) Most of John's work experience arises from teaching young children.

Does "arises" work in (2)? Thanks a lot.
Topic: confusing grammar
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 11:33:14 AM
I am very confused about the grammar of my two sentences.

(1) The black, the white and the red ruler(s) on the desk are mine.

Please note that in my next example, assume that there are several marbles in each color.
(2) A black, a white and a red marble is or are to be removed from the box.


In (1), do I need to pluralize the word "ruler"?

In (2), which verb works better "is" or "are"? I think it could be either one. The reason is that "marble" being singular requires "is" to be used. On the other hand, it could be "are" because there are three marbles.

Please give me your feedback. Thank you for your help.
Topic: using three different methods
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 11:14:10 AM
I am a little confused about the phrase "using three different methods".

(ex) You can solve this difficult physics problem using three different methods.


It can mean "using a combination of the three methods" or "using any one of the three methods".

Does it really have two different meanings? Thanks for your help.
Topic: dreams in the presen tense?
Posted: Thursday, February 09, 2017 12:00:51 AM
Not long ago, I posted a topic about whether or not you could talk about the content of videos and novels in the present tense.

If you had a dream two weeks ago, could you talk about its content in the present tense?

Could you answer my question? Thanks.
Topic: which tense works better in my sentence with "before"
Posted: Friday, February 03, 2017 5:03:46 PM
I am going to make up an example with "before".

(ex) Before my cousin moved to England, I held/had held a farewell party for him. A week after he bought/had bought a home there, he emailed me a few photos of himself and his family.

Most of my friends and I think the past participle works better because the events mentioned above came before the others. However, a few of my other friends think the past simple also works because they sound natural in the sentences.

Do you think both tenses fit the sentences? Thanks for your help.
Topic: buy/sell something at or for a price
Posted: Friday, February 03, 2017 4:39:25 PM
I am going to make up two sentences below.

(1) John bought a used car for/at a high price.

(2) Mary sold her house for/at a low price.

Which preposition is grammatically correct? Thanks.

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