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Profile: FROSTY X RIME
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User Name: FROSTY X RIME
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Last Visit: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 8:45:25 AM
Number of Posts: 942
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: My EXPRESSION of the day
Posted: Thursday, June 15, 2017 9:35:55 AM
TheParser wrote:
No. 9

I learned this expression just yesterday. Perhaps some of you advanced learners may like to know it, too.

*****

At school, at work, on the Web, etc., we often meet dangerous individuals.

This saying tells us that we should keep our distance from dangerous individuals. We should not let them influence us (give us bad ideas).

"If you dine with the Devil, you must bring a long spoon."


a. "dine with the Devil" = have a meal with the Devil. ( = If you mix with bad people.)

b. If you have a long spoon, you can reach the food but not have to sit too close to the Devil. ( = keep far away from bad people.)


It's a droll. I had a hearty laugh. Thanks, parser.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Pub/Bar Name Association
Posted: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 11:09:07 AM


Snake Pass Inn, Lake district-Actually I have stayed a night and drunk their beer there.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: My EXPRESSION of the day
Posted: Thursday, June 08, 2017 4:55:41 PM
I gave up smoking cold turkey.

Another useful expression to learn. Thanks, Parser.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Pub/Bar Name Association
Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 11:42:29 AM


John the unicorn, Peckham, England

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: The problem of prepositions
Posted: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 10:02:24 AM
tunaafi wrote:
TheParser wrote:

Formal, elegant English:

"May I ask a question of you?"

I think most native speakers of British English would consider that over-formal and outdated. I suggest that learners stick to the more natural "May I ask (you) a question?"


It may be antiquated and over-formal but in some cases, the formation is very useful as follows:

"Do you like an apple?" asked Adam of Eve.

It would be less precise or a little confusing or sounds awkward or perhaps even wrong to say the following instead:

"Do you like an apple?" asked Adam Eve.

You can argue that you can say thus instead:

Adam asked Eve, "Do you like an apple?"

But, we sometimes want to say things differently rather than have only one way to say things.

I strongly believe things should not be binned or treated disrespectfully or disdained because of their old age only. Old things can be brought back into use if necessary.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Very British Problem
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 11:24:54 AM
I am surprised to learn British take the word "regards" that way and can't help laughing at my own stupidity adopting it.
One of my classmates, who is British-born and bred, always finished his email with "best regards" so I imitated it without thinking much.
I just assumed it was a modern fancy way in writing an email against your sincerely or yours faithfully in a letter.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: what is the meaning of this sentence?
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 11:15:28 AM
"but" in the context means "only". And I think "kind" means "agreeable" there.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Had he lived, he would have turned 100
Posted: Thursday, May 25, 2017 6:36:55 AM
This is my guess.
"Would turn" is used because May 29 is yet to come.
If the date May 29 had passed, "would have turned" would have been appropriate.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Show Me
Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 3:41:39 PM
Lovely shop indeed, Anton. Thanks for the photo.



Show me where you go for a walk.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: take up
Posted: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 3:36:44 PM
Don't British or Americans use "stand up for"?

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-

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