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Profile: FROSTY X RIME
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User Name: FROSTY X RIME
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Joined: Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 12:17:56 PM
Number of Posts: 1,008
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Ing
Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 10:39:29 AM
BobShilling wrote:
BobShilling wrote:
John drives far too fast. He's going to have an accident one day


FROSTY X RIME wrote:
"be going to" has some other function than "determination or intention". That is "prediction".

Fine, but the prediction is based on the present evidence we have that Bob drives too fast. That is why, in this case, the present progressive is not appropriate.

By the way, I see that the page you linked us to contains these words (my emphasis added):

Be going to is used when we want to emphasise our decision or the evidence in the present:

[An ‘A’ road is a main road. A ‘B’ road is a smaller road.]

We are now very late so we’re going to take the ‘B’ road
. (the speaker refers to the present and emphasises the decision)

I know the ‘B’ road will be quicker at this time of day. (the speaker states a fact)


In both the examples, the speaker's decision is based on evidence - the knowledge that the B road will be quicker.
[/quote]

Hello BobShilling,

Regarding the evidence thing you have been mentioning, of course there must be evidence for an assumption or prediction. It's a natural process of thinking to come to a prediction.

I think we are discussing the issue whether there is a difference between "be going to" and "present continuous". Whilst many others argue there is no difference between those two, some do think there is a difference. I do not know where your pointing-out the evidence things is heading for in connection with the difference between the two. What is your exact intention of bringing it up?

Having evidence to make a statement does not lead to anywhere. Why is that? According to some peole's belief there is a difference between the two, when you say, "we are going to have a party tomorrow", you are declaring that you have determined to have a party tomorrow or you are intending to . It does not necessary mean you have evident to support your decision. One day you just woke up and came up with an idea and said that and then after that, you would start preparing for a party-sending out invitations or going shopping to buy stuff you will need-, which was to be evidence to your later declaration, "I am having party tomorrow." If I have gotten it right, "We are going to have a party tomorrow," precedes "I am having party tomorrow."

In short, when you say, "we are going to have a party tomorrow," you do not have to have evidence to state it but you just need your determination/intention only whilst when you say "it's going to rain tomorrow" or "you are so clumsy. you are going to break the vase someday," or "John drives far too fast. He's going to have an accident one day," you have some sort of evidence to state them.

If those two "be going to" and "present continuous" are the exactly same things, they should be interchangeable but they are not.
For example, you would never hear anybody saying, "It's raining tomorrow," or "John drives far too fast. He's having an accident one day."






What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Ing
Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2018 6:30:43 AM
BobShilling wrote:
FROSTY X RIME wrote:
Be Logical. The cases of weather have been always dealt as exceptional cases, for example when you say "It's hot," the "it" in the sentence does not play the same role as the "it" in the sentence "It is a pen."


John drives far too fast. He's going to have an accident one day. This has nothing to do with weather, so we apparently have another type of exception.

My contention is that there is no need for exceptions if we consider 'BE going to' as used when there is some form of present evidence for a future situation.


Dear Bobshilling,

"be going to" has some other function than "determination or intention". That is "prediction".

The example you have given above simply states a prediction.

I hope it helps.

Check out the link below.

Prediction

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Ing
Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2018 5:37:29 AM
BobShilling wrote:
FROSTY X RIME wrote:
The difference between present continuous and be going to

It may help. It is very well written and explained.

It's not bad for a basic summary, but the writer believes that "Be going to [...] puts an extra emphasis on the idea of intention." As I pointed in an earlier post, Be going to does not emphasise, or even necessarily involve, intention:

There is no sense of intention or determination in such natural sentences as:

1. Look at those black clouds. It's going to rain soon.
2. John drives far too fast. He's going to have an accident one day
.



Hello BobShilling,

Let's say it is true There is no sense of intention or determination in such natural sentences as:

1. Look at those black clouds. It's going to rain soon.
2. John drives far too fast. He's going to have an accident one day
.[/color][/quote]

but it does not mean that the the rules are not applicable to other cases. Be Logical.

The cases of weather have been always dealt as exceptional cases, for example when you say "It's hot," the "it" in the sentence does not play the same role as the "it" in the sentence "It is a pen."

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Ing
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 11:06:37 AM
The difference between present continuous and be going to

It may help. It is very well written and explained.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: o that+ won´t
Posted: Sunday, July 22, 2018 5:06:08 PM
Yes, they are both correct.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Fabulous Troglodytes??
Posted: Sunday, July 22, 2018 6:08:23 AM
I think leon’s Supposition is absolutely correct.

Fabulous- of fable

Well-done, Leon

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: an idiom meaning help
Posted: Saturday, July 14, 2018 4:55:54 PM
No,"On one's back" means nagging constantly about one.

You may be looking for "have got your back" or "back you up" if you are looking for an idiom that contains "back" in it.

-have got someone's back: to be prepared or ready to support or vouch for someone;
-back up: to give moral or psychological support or aid or courage

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: FUNNIEST PHOTO Collection
Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2018 6:41:42 AM


What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: Do you know what's growing on your kitchen towel?
Posted: Monday, June 25, 2018 1:16:55 PM
Hahaha ⬆︎

Do you know what is growing in/on your tooth brush?

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Topic: looking for an idiom
Posted: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 8:17:59 AM
As srirr meantioned, I came up with "beat around the bush" as well.
I will support that.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-

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