The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: sureshot
About
User Name: sureshot
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Examiner of English Language in Competitive Examin
Interests: Writing books on English Language and teaching English.
Gender: Male
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, December 9, 2019 6:22:02 AM
Number of Posts: 2,419
[0.25% of all post / 1.56 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The plane crashed into the ground and broke into pieces.
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2019 6:21:41 AM
Reiko07 wrote:
The plane crashed into the ground and broke into pieces.
[my sentence]

Question: Does the repetition of into sound weird to you?

_____________________


The use of a preposition twice in one sentence is not unusual or weird. The use of expressions "crashed into (something)" and "broke into (small) pieces" is correct.
Topic: Ed
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2019 6:06:50 AM
Atatürk wrote:
Hi
Why do we say absent-minded but dead-end and not dead-ended?


_____________________

Absent-minded is used as an adjective."Dead end" is used as a noun to talk about a road or passage that has no way out at one end. "Dead-end" is also used as an adjective in expressions like "a dead-end street".

It is incorrect to say that "dead-ended" does not exist. It is clarified that "dead-end" also functions as a verb.If a road or path dead-ends,it is closed at one end, and does not lead anywhere. Two example sentences using "dead-ended" are: "The road dead-ended halfway up the mountain" and "He had to turn his bike around at the end of the trail as it dead-ended at a parking lot." (Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/dead-end). TFD also mentions that "dead-ended" is a past participle(Source: https://www.thefreedictionary.com/dead-ended)

In brief, it would be correct to say that "dead-end", "dead-ends (singular verb in simple present) and "dead-ended (simple past and past participle)are all correct verb forms. I can only surmise that "dead-ended" is not used as an adjective akin to "absent-mined", as it is used as a past participle verb form. "Absent-minded" is not used as a verb.






Topic: a/the patron
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 10:27:58 PM
coag wrote:
Hello all,

Which of the following two sentences is correct with regard to the use of the articles?
1. Frederick the Great was a patron of many artists.
2. Frederick the Great was the patron of many artists.


____________

I would prefer to use "a". The use of "the" should not sway one's choice. "Frederick the Great" should be treated as one name. It is akin to saying one name. "A patron" implies that he was one amongst several other patrons. "The" is correct if both the reader/listener and the speaker can identify one definite noun (= patron). Since more than patron is likely, the use of indefinite article "a" is the preferred choice.
Topic: in or at
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 2:58:18 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
sureshot wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
My car broke down in /at King's Road.

Which is the correct preposition?

Thanks.

_____________________

Say: ... on King's Road.

Isn't "on" AE?

________________


"ON" is used in British English too.
Topic: What "garrulous hesitation" and "a suitable air of diffidence" mean?
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 12:02:25 AM
Afruzi wrote:
Hi there, I read the following sentence and couldn't find the meanings of "garrulous hesitation" and "a suitable air of diffidence". Would anyone help me please to know about the meanings of the expressions? Pray Pray

Quote:
If I have any suggestions, I shall put them with garrulous hesitation and a suitable air of diffidence.


Thanks!

_________________________

I partially agree with Joe Gallagher.

In my view, the writer/speaker wishes to imply:

- "with garrulous hesitation": The writer/speaker means "with reluctance to be verbose" (= without being verbose)

- "with a suitable air of diffidence": The writer/speaker means "modestly".

Topic: in or at
Posted: Sunday, December 1, 2019 11:47:06 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
My car broke down in /at King's Road.

Which is the correct preposition?

Thanks.

_____________________

Say: ... on King's Road.
Topic: Take care lest you catch cold!
Posted: Friday, November 29, 2019 12:55:08 AM
Reiko07 wrote:
Take care lest you catch cold!
[From a grammar book for Japanese high school students.]

Question: Does this sentence sound old-fashioned to you?


__________________________________

This sentence is in subjunctive mood. You will also come across:

- Take care lest you should catch cold!

Normally, you are likely to hear:

- Take care in case you catch cold!
Topic: deliver
Posted: Monday, November 25, 2019 7:34:41 AM
Tara2 wrote:
Thank you so much!
Is that this definition in a dictionary?

to achieve or produce something that has been promised:
The government has failed to deliver (what it promised).
mainly US The Republicans are relying on their agricultural policies to deliver the farmers' vote (= to persuade farmers to vote for them).

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/deliver


____________________

Cambridge Dictionary mentions the meaning as "to achieve or produce something that has been promised". It conveys a similar sense.
Topic: deliver
Posted: Monday, November 25, 2019 6:26:05 AM
Tara2 wrote:

What does " deliver" mean?

COBB: What do you want from us?
Saito: Inception.Is it possible?
COBB: If I were to do it. If I could do it... how do I know you can deliver?


Inception, movie


_____________

Here, "deliver" means "fulfil what is expected". The speaker has expects a certain outcome and is seeking a confirmation that promises making good the expectation.

I hope this helps.

Topic: We have two types of photo frame(s).
Posted: Saturday, November 23, 2019 11:15:05 PM
vipin viswanathan wrote:
We have two types of photo frames.
We have two types of photo frame.

Which is right? Thanks in advance.

__________________

The first sentence is correct. Ask yourself whether "photo frame" is a countable noun or not. In such a pattern, a countable noun is in plural form after the preposition "of".

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.