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Profile: nightdream
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User Name: nightdream
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Languages, swimming, painting
Gender: Female
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Joined: Thursday, August 20, 2015
Last Visit: Saturday, April 15, 2017 8:39:31 PM
Number of Posts: 122
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: in the distance
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 10:22:44 PM
Thank you very much, thar and Allana.

I disagree with Ashwin - poplars grow as a single trees in our area. They grow in rows when they are planted on purpose.

What is the difference between "cultivate" and "plant"? Trees and flowers are cultivated, but vegatavles and fruit are planted, aren't they? Or does "cultivate" mean "to plant on purpose"? Or are the words British and American variants?
Topic: in the distance
Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 5:20:45 PM
Is the use of the phrase right?

- Can you see the poplar in the distance? (in the meaning "that is far from us")
Topic: Is the phrase right?
Posted: Saturday, May 28, 2016 9:43:16 AM
I am still interested very much in what is DraOnspeaker's "having" - gerund or participle one?
Topic: Do I use the phrase in a right way?
Posted: Saturday, May 28, 2016 9:39:22 AM
Thank you very much, DragOnspeaker!
Topic: Do I use the phrase in a right way?
Posted: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 5:25:20 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello again nightdream.

In a single sentence - the most simple way to say it is "He took the flag to the top of the mountain."

You could say something a bit longer (if you want to tell a story):

"He struggled through the snow, until he reached the top of the mountain, where he planted his flag."

You don't have to say that he picked up the flag (he took it from the shelf) or that he carried it up (he took it to the top).

English sentences do not always say everything you mean. It is the same in every other language, too.
In my first sentence, the reader would assume that he picked up the flag before climbing, and that he planted the flag at the top.
In my second sentence, the reader would assume that he picked it up from the shelf and carried it to the top.

You could say "He took the flag, and took it to the top of the mountain." - but that sounds 'odd' as it says more than is needed, and repeats a word unnecessarily.


Is it acceptable to say about a wild animal that "It picked up" something?

In the case when somebody finds a kitten or a puppy on his way, what should one say about him: "He found it and took/brought it home"? - "took" or "brought"?
Topic: Is the phrase right?
Posted: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 5:12:41 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Now you have a really difficult question! Dancing

My teacher used to say something like "The only rule is 'Omit "that" where possible, except where it's useful', but there is no rule to say where it's possible and it is your opinion about when it's useful."

Personally, I would omit it. - but that's just me.

*********
The "having it" is unnecessary in your sentence.
The verb/phrase "to live on" includes the idea of eating/drinking.
Vampyres live on blood.
Dogs live on meat but cows live on grass.


************
In a sentence like the one you gave, the "-ing" word seems to me to be the present participle.
Sometimes, it's only a matter of how it's used in a particular sentence.

The dog stole the sausage, eating it. (it seems more like a verb here)
Eating sausages was the dog's delight. (It's definitely a noun/gerund here)


I meant what is "having" - gerund or Participle one in your sentences - they were:

It should be "They lived by taking milk from the king and having it."
or
"They lived by taking milk from the king, having it"

Is it a gerund in the first case and a participe one in the second case or gerunds in both of the cases?
Topic: use of some phrases
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 8:54:22 AM
A rumen * is a ruminant’s tripe, the first division of a ruminant’s stomach.

1) Which of the suggested variants is more acceptable?


a) they found a rumen with food in it on a road (under "food" implies its content because it is food for wild animals).

b) they found a rumen with its content (in it) on a road.



2) An extract from a legend: "They were friends-animals" - is the use acceptable?



Topic: Is the phrase right?
Posted: Sunday, May 22, 2016 5:53:31 PM
Hope 123 and DragOnspeaker, I like the variants suggested by both of you. Thank you very much.

Can I use such a mixed variant as:

"They were poor and lived on milk that they got from the king, having it"?

1/ Is it better not to miss "that" or not?

2/ And what is DragOnspeaker's "having" - gerund or Participle one?

(And as to the DragOnspeaker's questions - yes, it is charity).
Topic: Do I use the phrase in a right way?
Posted: Sunday, May 22, 2016 5:31:25 PM
thar wrote:
What is it you are trying to say?
Are you being literal, or using it as in idiom?

There are lots of idioms with mountains in, but this is not close to any I can think of.

If it is literal, then grammatically, you can bring something to the top of the mountain.

But 'to bring' means 'to me'

That implies that I am already on the top of the mountain. Have I just climbed it, or do I live there?

If everybody else is down below then you take it to the top of the mountain.

eg, climbers in the Himalayas often take prayer flags to the top of the mountain with them.

If I am stuck on the summit of a mountain and there is a snow storm that traps me for days, then I want someone to bring some oxygen to the top of the mountain for me.
Good luck with that! Whistle


thar, thank you for the comments. I think you mean that "bring" implies "bring to some living one". Am I right?
Topic: Do I use the phrase in a right way?
Posted: Sunday, May 22, 2016 5:27:54 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello again nightdream.

In a single sentence - the most simple way to say it is "He took the flag to the top of the mountain."

You could say something a bit longer (if you want to tell a story):

"He struggled through the snow, until he reached the top of the mountain, where he planted his flag."

You don't have to say that he picked up the flag (he took it from the shelf) or that he carried it up (he took it to the top).

English sentences do not always say everything you mean. It is the same in every other language, too.
In my first sentence, the reader would assume that he picked up the flag before climbing, and that he planted the flag at the top.
In my second sentence, the reader would assume that he picked it up from the shelf and carried it to the top.

You could say "He took the flag, and took it to the top of the mountain." - but that sounds 'odd' as it says more than is needed, and repeats a word unnecessarily.


Thanks a lot for your explanations.

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