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Profile: Born Villain
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User Name: Born Villain
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Joined: Thursday, December 3, 2015
Last Visit: Sunday, August 18, 2019 12:18:42 PM
Number of Posts: 46
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: On the couch - meaning
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 9:56:36 AM
It's from an Amy Winehouse interview.

Hot date - what do you wear?
Sexy underwear on the couch.

What does "on the couch" mean in this case?
Topic: Is this sentence OK?
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 3:47:43 AM
BobShilling, but that's the intended meaning: they will destroy everything that they had between them AND all the hope for ever meeting again.
Topic: Is this sentence OK?
Posted: Saturday, August 10, 2019 1:59:09 PM
Thank you for your comments.
I've rephrased it. Does it makes sense now?

I will destroy everything that we had between us, along with the hope - a chimerical one but still hope - that maybe someday we'll meet again.

"Glossary", so to speak
everything that we had between us — their romance;
a chimerical one but still hope — specifies the kind of hope that's slim and weak; the meaning of the phrase is that even though this hope is slim, it's still a hope.
Topic: Does this sound OK?
Posted: Saturday, August 10, 2019 1:24:28 PM
"What happened?" she said. So I told her what did.

Should I leave out "did" or the sentence won't work this way any way.
Topic: Is this sentence OK?
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 3:28:09 PM
Hello. I just wanted to know if the bold part of the sentence is grammatically correct and sounds okay.

I will destroy everything that we had along with, even though chimerical, but hope that maybe someday we'll meet again.

Thanks in advance!
Topic: Yelling a name in written speech
Posted: Monday, August 5, 2019 4:22:52 AM
Thank you, guys!
Special thanks to sportsherald! I liked your suggestion the most.
Topic: Yelling a name in written speech
Posted: Sunday, August 4, 2019 1:27:36 PM
How to properly write the name Martha to express that it's being yelled out?
I don't want to just write "Martha!," he yelled.
I want to use something like "Mar-thaaaaa" or "Maaaarrrthhhhaaaa" or "Maaaarthaaaaa" or the like.
Topic: He said without a stutter
Posted: Saturday, August 3, 2019 7:01:14 AM
Thank you, Wilmar!
Topic: He said without a stutter
Posted: Friday, August 2, 2019 1:33:16 PM
Thank you for your reply, Drag0nspeaker! I'd been thinking about using the "bat an eye" idiom but decided not to because the entry on it here on TFD read: "Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response".
But since it was your first option you've written and, I presume, come up with, I will go with this one after all)) Thanks again!

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!
I think it's OK - It doesn't imply that Max usually stutters.

However, I think the idiom you're looking for is concerned with a different bit of the face.

"Exactly," Max said without batting an eye.
"Exactly," Max said without blinking an eye.
"Exactly," Max said without even a blink.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/without+batting+an+eye
Topic: He said without a stutter
Posted: Friday, August 2, 2019 12:50:48 PM
"Exactly," Max said without even a stutter.
Would this necessarily imply that Max has a speech impediment? The meaning of the sentence should be that Max didn't get flustered/shocked/surprised by what he just heard.
What are you suggestions, given the context?

Thank you in advance!

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