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Profile: Wilmar (USA)
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User Name: Wilmar (USA)
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Thursday, June 4, 2015
Last Visit: Thursday, August 22, 2019 7:25:58 PM
Number of Posts: 2,841
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: a question of tense
Posted: Thursday, August 22, 2019 2:54:13 PM
I would say, "I wonder of that restaurant is still there."
Topic: Can you use "one" only once?
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 7:23:45 PM
You will most often hear the version with "one" used twice. It helps separting the two groups that you are identifying in the sentence.
As in...
(1) You need to define the ages specifically: one for being youngest with least experience and one for being the oldest with most experience.
Topic: As
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 5:42:11 PM
"while"
Topic: Should it be "lifespan" instead?
Posted: Monday, August 19, 2019 11:47:46 AM
It's fine the way it is.
Topic: Ours
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 4:17:42 PM
This smelly, good-for-nothing cat is ours. And I wouldn't trade her for all gold in China!

Tears... Our 21-year-old cat passed on to her reward July 1. Miss her so terribly much. She was all mine!
Topic: fix a time
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 4:16:39 PM
Most commonly, you hear "let's set a time for our meeting."
You will hear, sometimes, "let's make the time for our meeting" when it is recognized that calendars need to be cleared in order to have the meeting. So this indicates extra effort -- setting a time for the meeting which will include "shuffling" your calendar to make the meeting possible. Of course, the time must be agreed upon before taking the next step.
It's not very common to hear "fix a time..." but everyone will understand exactly what you mean.
Topic: Coastal
Posted: Saturday, August 17, 2019 4:13:34 PM
I think the meaning is that the box jellyfish live in the sea near the coast.
Topic: succrssfully recovered
Posted: Saturday, August 17, 2019 4:12:03 PM
It's a commonly used expression.
Topic: wordhub
Posted: Saturday, August 17, 2019 4:10:56 PM
rape 2 (rāp)
n.
Either of two European plants (Brassica napus or B. rapa) of the mustard family, cultivated as fodder and for their seeds, which yield a valuable oil. Certain varieties of these plants yield canola oil. Also called colza, oilseed rape.
[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rāpa, pl. of rāpum, turnip.]
rape 3 (rāp)
n.
The refuse of grapes left after the extraction of the juice in winemaking.
Topic: wordhub
Posted: Saturday, August 17, 2019 4:09:50 PM
Beth, They refuse to recognize this ordinary word, yet they allow hateful language on all the comment sections. Your complaint has been made many times, and for some reason, they think they are saving the world by ignoring this ordinary word.

rape 2 (rāp)
n.
Either of two European plants (Brassica napus or B. rapa) of the mustard family, cultivated as fodder and for their seeds, which yield a valuable oil. Certain varieties of these plants yield canola oil. Also called colza, oilseed rape.
[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rāpa, pl. of rāpum, turnip.]
rape 3 (rāp)
n.
The refuse of grapes left after the extraction of the juice in winemaking.

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